ad info

 
CNN.com Allpoliticsallpolitics.comwith TIME
CNN.com EUROPE:
 
 
 

Search


Search tips
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Bush unveiling religious-based charity plan

Bush and family attend largely black church

Bush appears to make encouraging first impression

Bush Cabinet will meet over California power crisis

Former first lady says Reagans repaid Bel Air home with interest

Lockhart defends Clintons as GOP criticizes gifts, pardons, pranks

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Indian PM witnesses quake devastation

EU considers tighter BSE controls

Alpine tunnel tops summit agenda

Bill Gates to address Davos

(MORE)

 MARKETS    1613 GMT, 12/28
5217.4
-25.00
5160.1
+42.97
4624.58
+33.42

 
SPORTS

(MORE)

 All Scoreboards
WEATHER
European Forecast

 Or choose another Region:
EUROPE

WORLD

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

  IN OTHER NEWS

U.S.

HEALTH

TRAVEL



(MORE HEADLINES)
EDITIONS:
CNN.com U.S.:
*

LOCAL LANGUAGES:


MULTIMEDIA:

CNN WEB SITES:

CNN NETWORKS:
CNN International

TIME INC. SITES:

SITE INFO:

WEB SERVICES:

Brooks Jackson: A presidential debate fact check

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Democrat Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush used facts as weapons during their first presidential debate Tuesday night in Boston, often leaving viewers to wonder just who was telling the truth.

They argued over whether one Wisconsin couple making $25,000 a year would be covered under Bush's prescription drug plan for Medicare beneficiaries.

Gore and Bush
Throughout their first head-to-head debate, Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush often used facts and figures more to confuse than to inform  

"Under my plan half of their costs would be paid right away," Gore said. "Under governor Bush's plan, they would not get one penny for four to five years."

"I cannot let this go by -- the old-style Washington politics, 'We're going to scare you in the voting booth,'" Bush responded. "Under my plan the man will get immediate help with prescription drugs. It's called Immediate Helping Hand," he said of his proposal.

"Can I make another point?" Gore insisted over Bush's objections. "They get $25,000 a year income. That makes them ineligible."

The fact is, Bush's plan would subsidize premiums for prescription drug premiums only for low-income persons in the first years, just as Gore said. It would phase out completely for couples at about $20,000 a year.

Bush's plan does call for immediate catastrophic coverage for seniors at all income levels, paying all prescription expenses over $6,000 per year. So Gore's $25,000 couple would be covered -- sort of.

Throughout the evening, Bush accused Gore of fudging the numbers: "I'm beginning to think that not only did he invent the Internet, but he invented the calculator. It's fuzzy math."

Gore, meanwhile, continued to hammer at Bush's tax plan: "Almost half of all the tax cut benefits as I've said under Governor Bush's tax cut plan go to the wealthiest one percent. I think we have to make the right, responsible choices."

"Well, the man is practicing fuzzy math again," Bush offered by way of rebuttal. "The facts are, after my plan the wealthiest Americans pay more taxes than the percentage of the whole than they do today."

Is that a fact? Well, the bipartisan Joint Tax Committee of Congress analyzed Bush's tax plan and said that after it was mostly phased in, in 2005, persons making over $200,000 a year would be paying 27.4 percent of federal income taxes, exactly the same share as under current law.

By that measure, Bush is wrong.

The same bipartisan analysis showed persons making over $100,000 a year would get 51 percent of the money under Bush's tax cut plan.

Throughout the 90-minute debate, both candidates often used facts and figures more to confuse than to inform. As always, voters would do well to check the facts.

 
EUROPE'S VIEW
Where do Bush and Gore stand on issues of importance to Europe? Launch our Interactive Guide.

POLLS
View the latest tracking poll or dig into our poll archives.

WHAT'S AT STAKE

VIDEO
Watch selected policy speeches and campaign commercials from the major presidential candidates.

WHERE THEY STAND
See where George W. Bush and Al Gore stand on the major issues.

THE STATES
Who are your elected officials? What is the past presidential vote and number of electoral votes in your state? What are the presidential primary results and exit polls? Find out with these state political and election facts.

ELECTION GUIDE
Get Election 2000 zip code searchable candidate biographies and other material for races for governor, Senate and House in our Election Guide.

FOLLOW THE MONEY
How much money have the candidates raised? Here are their quarterly reports to the Federal Election Commission.

RACES
If you need to know who's up in 2000 and what seats are open, launch this quick guide.

WEB WHITE AND BLUE
Allpolitics.com is a partner in the Web White and Blue rolling cyber-debate, a daily online exchange among the major presidential candidates. Look for twice-daily updates Sunday through Friday until election day.


MORE STORIES:

Wednesday, October 4, 2000


 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.