An Egyptian protester waves his national flag as thousands celebrate on July 1, 2013 in Cairo's landmark Tahrir square after Egypt's armed forces gave President Mohamed Morsi 48 hours to meet the demands of the people or it would intervene with a roadmap. The statement comes a day after millions took to the street demanding that Morsi resigns. An official from Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood said the powerful movement was "studying" the army's statement. Egypt is deeply divided between Morsi's Islamist supporters and a broad-based opposition. AFP PHOTO/GIANLUIGI GUERCIAGIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AFP/Getty Images
Egypt's military gives Morsy ultimatum
04:48 - Source: CNN

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Story highlights

NEW: Foreign minister resigns, president's office says Egypt won't "go backwards"

"Everyone is talking as if Morsy is officially out of power," one protester says

An Egyptian military spokesman says there's no coup

"Incompetent" Morsy is "his own worst enemy," analyst says

Cairo CNN  — 

Just don’t call it a coup.

Appearing to throw its weight behind an opposition that swarmed Cairo’s Tahrir Square, the Egyptian military told the country’s civilian government it has until Wednesday evening to “meet the demands of the people” or it will step in to restore order. In a statement carried nationwide on radio and television, the military called the 48-hour ultimatum “a final chance to shoulder the burden of a historic moment in our country.”

But a military spokesman said late Monday that the culture of the armed forces – which dominated the country for decades – “doesn’t allow it to adopt the policy of military coups.” The statement was meant to push all factions toward quick solutions and a national consensus, and the armed forces aren’t looking to be part of the political or ruling circles, the spokesman, Col. Ahmed Ali, said in written statement.

While insisting they want no direct role in national politics, the generals appeared instead to be pressuring Mohamed Morsy, Egypt’s first freely elected president, to restructure his government. The steps could include reducing the influence of the Muslim Brotherhood in his cabinet and calling early presidential and parliamentary elections, a source close to highly placed members of Egypt’s leadership told CNN.

The protesters in Tahrir Square, who listened to the military statement on radios and cell phones, cheered as it was read. They roared as military helicopters passed overhead at dusk, trailing Egyptian flags and the banners of the armed services. After nightfall, they waved flags, honked horns and set off fireworks.

“Everyone is talking as if Morsy is officially out of power and the Brotherhood is officially out of power, and everyone is celebrating,” Bassem Sabry, an Egyptian writer who took part in Monday’s protests, told CNN’s Connect the World.

But Morsy’s office said early Tuesday that the military statement “has not yet been reviewed” by the president, adding “Egypt, by all its power, will not allow the country to go backwards under any circumstances.”

In the face of the protests, which began over the weekend, five government ministers announced their resignations Monday. The latest was Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr, Egypt’s official MENA news agency reported.

Morsy, a U.S.-educated Islamist, was elected Egypt’s president in June 2012, but critics say he has become increasingly authoritarian during his year in power.

And he has failed to revive Egypt’s economy, which crashed when the 2011 uprising that toppled Mubarak drove tourists away.

“That some of the revolutionaries are calling on the army to return to politics is a testament to how polarized Egypt is a year after the election of Morsy,” Gerges said. “Think of the millions of people who cheered Morsy after his election. Think of the millions of Egyptians who pinned their hopes on Morsy.

Gerges questioned Morsy’s ability to continue to lead but said he doubted the military would depose him. Such a move “would plunge Egypt into a greater legal, political and institutional crisis,” he said.

Shortly after the military’s announcement, Morsy met with Prime Minister Hisham Qandil and Egypt’s minister of defense and head of the country’s military, Gen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi, according to the president’s Facebook page. It was not immediately known what they discussed, and a late-night news conference planned by the president’s office was canceled.

The military will want to see the influence of the Muslim Brotherhood reduced in government and in the constitution, Gerges said.

Mubarak had long repressed the Islamic political movement, but it is now the nation’s most powerful political force.

The opposition Tamarod (“rebel”) Campaign called for nationwide protests, civil disobedience and a march on the presidential palace if Morsy doesn’t leave office by Tuesday. Demonstrators say they have collected 17 million signatures – roughly 4 million more than the number of votes that won Morsy the presidency – calling for Morsy to go.

The opposition comprises various groups and loose coalitions, some of which are loyal to the ousted Mubarak government, while others want the army to intervene.

That’s brought criticism from observers like Mohamad Elmasry, a journalism professor at the American University in Cairo, who says much of the movement is anti-democratic and elitist.

“The Muslim Brotherhood has made plenty of mistakes,” Elmasry told CNN. “But in medicine, they talk about triaging. If someone goes into the emergency room with a gunshot wound to the chest and a broken arm, the doctors treat the gunshot wound to the chest, not the broken arm.”

“The Brotherhood might be a broken arm with their mistakes,” he said, but “this anti-democratic tendency within these circles that is the gunshot wound to the democratic chest, if you will, of Egypt.”

AbdulMawgoud Dardery, a former member of parliament and a Muslim Brotherhood representative, told CNN’s “Amanpour” that the military could be an “honest broker” in a national dialogue. He said Morsy has reached out to opposition leaders many times, but the opposition “is afraid of democracy.”

“It failed in the previous five elections we had in Egypt since the revolution, and they don’t want to fail a sixth time,” he said. “That’s why they’re going to street politics.”

On Monday, protesters stormed the main headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood, the party that Morsy led before his election