Blame the U.S. for Mexico obesity?

Some experts say fried versions of traditional foods are to blame for Mexico's widening waistlines.

Story highlights

  • U.N. report says Mexico is now more obese than the United States
  • John Sutter: Maybe we should blame Mexico's northern neighbor
  • He says U.S. trends like fast food and sugary soda have drifted south
  • Sutter: "The least the U.S. could do is be a better neighbor"
Experts are putting forward all sorts of reasons Mexico recently became more obese than the United States -- and one of the most overweight countries in the world.
Poverty, tacos, urbanization, soda. Those are the widely discussed culprits. And they, along with the choices people in Mexico make, are no doubt part of the story.
But there's an uberfactor here: Mexico's neighbor to the north. Could one reason for Mexico's growing, deadly obesity problem be that the country is unfortunate enough to share a border with the United States -- land of the Coke, home of diabetes?
I started thinking about that issue after seeing news bounce all over the Internet that nearly a third of Mexicans now are obese, compared with 31.8% of Americans, according to a recent report from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.