Asia

Celebrating Yadnya Kasada Festival

Published 1546 GMT (2346 HKT) July 25, 2013
Share
Yadnya Kasada (5)Yadnya Kasada (5)
1 of 13
A Tenggerese shaman, celebrating the Yadnya Kasada Festival, sits at a temple near the crater of Mount Bromo on July 24, 2013 in Probolinggo, East Java, Indonesia. Yadnya Kasada is the main festival of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The Tenggerese people, a 600,000-strong isolated community, live in eastern central Java. Most identify themselves as Hindu, although they incorporate elements of Buddhism and Animist elements into their religion. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
On the fourteenth day of the festival, Tenggerese Hindus journey to Mount Bromo to make offerings of rice, fruits, vegetables, flowers and livestock to the mountain gods by throwing them into the volcano's caldera. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
A Tenggerese shaman says blessings during the Yadnya Kasada Festival. Traditionally, shamans are spiritual leaders of the nomadic community. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The origin of the festival dates back to the 15th century. According to legend, a childless couple climbed the volcano to pray for help conceiving a baby. The story says the Gods granted them 24 children -- on the condition that their 25th child be thrown into the volcano as a sacrifice. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The 25th child, a boy called Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after his parents initially refused to throw him into the volcano; the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The 25th child, a boy called Kesuma, was finally sacrificed in this way after his parents initially refused to throw him into the volcano; the tradition of throwing sacrifices into the caldera to appease the mountain Gods continues today. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
A worshipper throws an offering of vegetables into the caldera. Hundreds of people travel to the volcano to pray on the 14th day of the festival. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
While the worshippers throw their offerings into the volcano, local villagers gather under the edge of the crater, trying to catch some of the food in nets. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
A man tries to catch a chicken thrown into the crater by Hindu worshippers. People use nets and sarongs to catch the offerings. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The festival is the main spiritual event of the Tenggerese people and lasts about a month. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
Here, two villagers carry sacks full of offerings they managed to catch in their nets -- vegetables and even a live goat. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images
The Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, with Mount Bromo in the background, is the location of the Tenggerese villages where the Yadnya Kasada Festival is held. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images