Europe

The controversial loan of an Elgin Marble

Published 1410 GMT (2210 HKT) December 5, 2014
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The marble statue of the river god Ilissos, from the west pediment of the Parthenon in Greece, was designed by Pheidias in Athens during 438BC - 432BC. The British Museum is lending this statue, one of the Elgin Marbles, to the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Trustees of the British Museum
The Ilissos sculpture "is one of the finest of those to survive from the Parthenon," the British Museum said. The Trustees of the British Museum
A detail of the Ilissos torso. This is the first time any of the statues have been lent to a foreign museum. The Trustees of the British Museum
The Elgin Marbles are a set of Parthenon sculptures in a frieze that once adorned the upper sections of the temple in the Greek capital of Athens. The Trustees of the British Museum
Marble portrait bust of renowned leader of Athens, Pericles. This is a Roman copy of an original portrait which was perhaps created in Pericles' own day, or shortly after his death. The Trustees of the British Museum
The Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg. Greece has for decades been demanding the return of the sculptures, which were "acquired" by Lord Elgin between 1801 and 1805, bought from him by the British Parliament in 1816, and later presented to the British Museum. The Trustees of the British Museum