Football

Eva Carneiro: Chelsea doctor whose actions sparked row

Updated 1707 GMT (0107 HKT) June 7, 2016
Share
Eva CarneiroEva Carneiro
1 of 10
Chelsea doctor Eva Carneiro and physio Jon Fearn had angered Jose Mourinho by entering the field of play to treat Eden Hazard during the 2-2 draw against Swansea City. IAN KINGTON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
In the aftermath of the incident, Mourinho failed to issue a public apology to Carneiro. Shaun Botterill/Getty Images
Mourinho lost his temper when first-team doctor Carneiro and physio Fearn entered the field to treat attacker Hazard against Swansea City. Football rules mean a player must leave the pitch for a short period of time once they have received medical attention. Julian Finney/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Mourinho, who publicly criticized his medical team after the match, vents his anger on the touchline. Mike Hewitt/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Carneiro was backed by FIFA, with the governing body's chief medical officer Jiri Dvorak telling Sky Sports News that club doctors have an "ethical duty to look after the players' health." "Everyone involved has to respect the fact the doctor is in charge," he added. JAVIER SORIANO/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
"It is a problem inside the club that if you are not united it is more difficult," Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger, who has clashed with Mourinho on numerous occasions in the past, said of the incident. "It is the trust and unity that makes the strength." Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty
Mourinho looks on from the bench prior to the Premier League match between West Bromwich Albion and Chelsea at The Hawthorns on May 18, 2015. Carneiro is pictured to Mourinho's right. Shaun Botterill/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Caneiro, seen here on the Chelsea bench alongside team captain John Terry, joined the club in 2009 and had been first team doctor since 2011. Ben Hoskins/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Carneiro had claimed had claimed constructive dismissal by the Premier League club and sexual discrimination by Mourinho. Michael Regan/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Guidelines issued by the GMC -- the body to which all practicing medical doctors in Britain must be registered -- say a doctor must "take prompt action" if they believe a patient's "safety, dignity or comfort are being compromised." Paul Gilham/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images