Benzodiazepine overdose deaths soared in recent years, study finds

The number of prescriptions for Xanax, Valium and similar drugs increased in recent years.

Story highlights

  • Prescriptions of sedative drugs known as benzodiazepines has increased about 30% since 1996
  • Benzodiazepines are the second-leading cause of prescription drug overdose deaths after opioids
  • Overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines quadrupled between 1999 and 2010

(CNN)The use of benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and Valium, is on the rise, and the number of overdose deaths related to them soared in recent years, new research says.

Benzodiazepines are a class of medication with sedative properties that are prescribed for anxiety, insomnia and other conditions. The potential danger of benzodiazepines is no secret: They were involved in about 30% of prescription drug overdose deaths in 2013, second only to opioids, which were involved in 70% of overdose deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Researchers were hopeful that the last few years might see a decrease in benzodiazepine prescriptions.
    "Going into this study, we thought that prescribing would be steady or decline in the late 2000s [because] people became more aware of opioids so there might be more attention" to benzodiazepines, said Dr. Marcus A. Bachhuber, assistant professor of medicine at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Bachhuber led the study, which was published in the American Journal of Public Health.
    But any hope that benzodiazepine prescriptions slowed was dashed as Bachhuber and his colleagues looked at national surveys of U.S. households taken between 1996 and 2013.
    The survey data revealed that the percentage of adults in the United States who filled a benzodiazepine prescription per year increased by about 30%, from 4.1% in 1996, to 5.6% in 2013. In addition, the amount of benzodiazepine medicine -- whether Xanax, Valium, Ativan, Klonopin or other drugs in this class -- in a prescription doubled over this time period.
    This trend is "very concerning," Bachhuber said. It is not clear what's driving the continued increase in benzodiazepine prescribing, whether more anxiety and insomnia are being diagnosed, or benzodiazepines are becoming more common go-to treatments for these conditions, he said. The study found that anxiety was the most frequent reason these medications were given, accounting for 56% of prescriptions.

    Benzodiazepine 'shadow epidemic'

    The study found that the overdose death rate related to benzodiazepines more than quadrupled between 1999 and 2010, from 0.58 per 100,000 adults to 3.07 per 100,000 adults. The largest increase was among adults 18 to 64 years of age.
    Between 2010 and 2013, the rate of overdose deaths leveled off as they only plateaued among white adults, who make up the largest group of benzodiazepine users. Overdose deaths continued to rise among black and Hispanic people.
    The fact that the overall rise in benzodiazepine overdose deaths between 1999 and 2010 was greater than the rise in benzodiazepine prescribing during this same period suggests that "people used benzodiazepines in more risky ways as time went on," Bachhuber said.
    It could be that p