Tennis

Tennis parents: 'The good, the bad and the ugly'

Updated 1017 GMT (1817 HKT) June 15, 2016
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Bjorn Borg wife Patricia OstfeldtBjorn Borg wife Patricia Ostfeldt
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Former Swedish tennis player Bjorn Borg and his wife Patricia Ostfeldt watch the action at the French Open at Roland Garros. Eleven-time grand slam winner Borg has been taken aback by the parental pressure he's seen on the junior tennis circuit in Sweden. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
Known for being her sons' biggest fan, Judy Murray was the driving force behind Andy Murray's singles and Jamie Murray's doubles career. She coached them til they were 12 and continues to promote the sport by running tennis events for kids. "My mum's the one person who gets me," Murray has said. Jan Kruger/Getty Images for RBS-Set4Sport
"Uri Sharapova was one of the most professional parents I've ever worked with," tennis coach Peter McCraw told CNN. "He was undoubtedly committed to Maria's tennis but it was equally important how she conducted herself, saying thank you to the tournament director, being polite. That's what's more important long term." Clive Brunskill/Getty Images/File
The father of WTA powerhouses Venus and Serena Williams has sparked controversy, both for his outspoken critique of the tennis establishment and his influence on his daughters' careers. However Richard's masterplan that included moving to Compton, L.A. to instill "toughness" in his girls, has been instrumental in forming two of the world's top players. Paul Harris/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
The coach and father of American former world no. 1 Jennifer Capriati introduced Jennifer to the professional circuit at the age of 13. After staggering early success, she quit tennis reportedly telling her dad, "Leave me alone, you're screwing up my life." Soon after she was arrested for marijuana and shoplifting. At 24, a dramatic comeback saw her win one French and two Australian Opens, with dad Stefano as her coach. Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images /WireImage
In 2013 the fiery father of Australia's former No. 1 Bernard Tomic was handed an eight month suspended sentence after head-butting his son's training partner outside a Madrid hotel. Thomas Drouet of Monaco was left with a bandaged nose and neck brace, while John was banned from the tour for a year. Michael Dodge/Getty Images
Damir Dokic, father to Australian teenage tennis sensation Jelena, smashed a journalist's mobile phone at Wimbledon 2000, was evicted from the US Open for raging over the price of salmon and in 2001, alleged the Australian Open draw was rigged. After Jelena accused him of years of physical abuse as a child, Yugoslav war veteran Dokic reportedly threatened to blow up the Australian ambassador to Serbia with a hand grenade and was sentenced to 15 months in jail. AFP/Getty Images
Jim Pierce, the father of French-American champion Mary Pierce reportedly yelled "Mary, kill the b***h!" during his 12-year-old daughter's junior match. In 1993, Mary took out a restraining order on him, though she later told CNN that if it wasn't for his tough work ethic, "I wouldn't be where I am today." The Women's Tennis Association also introduced a regulation -- known as the "Jim Pierce Rule" -- which prohibited a player's friends, family and coaches from abusive conduct. Ken Levine/ALLSPORT/file
Peter Graf was such a vigorous coach and mentor of his 22 grand slam winning daughter Steffi that the German press nicknamed him "Papa Merciless." In 1997 the second-hand car salesman was convicted of evading $7.4m of tax on his daughter's earnings and was sentenced to three years and nine months in prison. Getty Images
Croatian player Mirjana Lucic, pictured here a year before she won the Australian Open women's doubles title at just 15, and her mother fled to America while she was a teenager to escape her physically abusive father and coach, Marinko. "There have been more beatings than anyone can imagine, sometimes because I lost a game, sometimes because I lost a set," Lucic reportedly said at the time. Clive Brunskill/Getty Images