After 15 years in vegetative state, man responds to nerve stimulation

EEG images show an increase of information sharing across the brain, as evidenced by the yellow and orange colors, following vagus nerve stimulation.

Story highlights

  • Vagus nerve stimulation is a technique used for epilepsy and depression
  • After a month of stimulation, the man's attention, movements and brain activity improved

(CNN)A car accident at 20 years old left a French man in a vegetative state for 15 years. But after neurosurgeons implanted a vagus nerve stimulator in his chest, the man, now 35, is showing signs of consciousness, according to a study published Monday in the journal Current Biology.

Vagus nerve stimulation is already used to help people with epilepsy and depression. This cranial nerve runs from the brain to other parts of the body, including the heart, lungs and gut; vagus means "wandering" in Latin.
    The study results challenge ideas that consciousness disorders lasting longer than 12 months are irreversible, the researchers believe.

    A demonstration of what's possible

    Vagus nerve activity is "important for arousal, alertness and the fight-or-flight response," wrote Dr. Angela Sirigu in an email. She is an author of the study and neuroscientist at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod in Lyon, France.
    Sirigu and her colleagues decided to test the ability of vagus nerve stimulation to restore consciousness in a patient in a vegetative state. Patients in a vegetative state show no evidence of consciousness, mental function or motor function. Unlike a coma, a vegetative state includes intermittent periods of eye opening; this seemingly hopeful sign, though, is not a normal waking, just a random physiological occurrence.
    Vagus nerve stimulation begins with a surgeon implanting a device in the chest and threading a wire under the skin. This wire joins the vagus nerve and the device, which sends electrical signals along the nerve to the brain stem (where the spinal cord and brain