How 'Sesame Street' can help children cope with traumatic experiences

"These big feelings are OK," shop owner Alan tells Big Bird in a "Sesame Street" video.

Story highlights

  • A new "Sesame Street" initiative was designed to help children cope with traumatic experiences
  • It also provides resources for parents and caregivers

(CNN)Big Bird is upset. Angry, sad, confused, anxious. "I've got all these feelings, you know ... and they're all mixed together," he tells Alan the shop owner in a new "Sesame Street" video. "And I -- I don't know what to do."

Alan tells him that big feelings are OK, especially "after hard things happen," and talks to him about a "safe place" where he can feel peaceful. Together, they take a deep breath, and the big yellow bird realizes that being in his nest with his teddy bear, thinking about his Granny Bird, is where he feels safest.
    It's one part of a new initiative from Sesame Street in Communities to help educate families faced with traumatic situations. The program, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other partners, is aimed at children, parents, caregivers and others in the community.
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