Hugh Jackman thought he peaked at 28
Hugh Jackman thought he peaked at 28


    Hugh Jackman thought he peaked at 28


Hugh Jackman thought he peaked at 28 03:45

Hugh Jackman's weepy movie memories are highly relatable

Updated 1856 GMT (0256 HKT) February 22, 2018

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"The best movies are able to transport you to worlds that you couldn't imagine yourself, that make you feel things that you may not feel in an everyday level, and that challenge your life, that change your life."

The first time Hugh Jackman saw his father cry, it was because of a gentle little alien named E.T.
They were watching the Steven Spielberg classic together when he looked up and saw tears rolling down his dad's face.
"I will never forget that," he said.
    When Jackman was 12 years old, he was at his friend Ian Drew's birthday party when they decided to watch "Gallipoli," a 1981 Australian war drama directed by Peter Weir.
    It left the room of pre-teens weeping.
    "Wizard of Oz" was the first movie he ever saw and, coincidentally, the one that made him want to become a storyteller.
    "Raiders of the Lost Ark" left him so excited and transported that he felt like his head was buzzing.
    Jackman said he has "a hundred" similar movie memories.
      Something you quickly learn about this great showman when sitting down with him is that he's also a big fan of great film, from his feel-good movie, "Midnight Run," to "The Deer Hunter," which changed his life when he saw it at 16 years old because it's when he realized that acting was a craft that would "take a lifetime to perfect."
      Jackman has made the most of his chance to master performing. Few actors can claim a filmography as admirably schizophrenic, best exemplified by his two 2017 releases, "Logan," his final turn as Wolverine, and "The Greatest Showman," where he plays circus founder P.T. Barnum.
      Jackman leans into the curves and bends he's encountered during his career -- "beautiful, amazing" surprises, he calls them. He's motivated by the belief that movies "can change people's lives."
        "When you are in a shared experience with an audience, all willingly going on this adventure together, it's so powerful," he said. "And it can last a lifetime."