CNN
Now playing
03:47
Deaths in PR still attributed to Maria
SAN ISIDRO, PUERTO RICO - OCTOBER 15:  Uncollected debris stand near damaged homes in an area without electricity on October 15, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is suffering shortages of food and water in many areas and only 15 percent of grid electricity has been restored. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, swept through.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images South America/Getty Images
SAN ISIDRO, PUERTO RICO - OCTOBER 15: Uncollected debris stand near damaged homes in an area without electricity on October 15, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is suffering shortages of food and water in many areas and only 15 percent of grid electricity has been restored. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, swept through. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:46
Puerto Rico governor.: We're treated like second-class citizens
Now playing
03:53
This is Puerto Rico's 'Maria Generation'
CNN
Now playing
01:04
The drive that shows how badly Puerto Rico was hit
hurricane maria damage sg orig_00002516.jpg
hurricane maria damage sg orig_00002516.jpg
Now playing
01:28
Hurricane Maria leaves trail of devastation
MOROVIS, PUERTO RICO - DECEMBER 20:  A resident, whose home remains without electricity, watches as debris is removed on December 20, 2017 in Morovis, Puerto Rico. Barely three months after Hurricane Maria made landfall, approximately one-third of the devastated island is still without electricity and 14 percent lack running water. While the official death toll from the massive storm remains at 64, The New York Times recently reported the actual toll for the storm and its aftermath likely stands at more than 1,000. Puerto Rico's governor has ordered a review and recount as the holiday season approaches.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images/File
MOROVIS, PUERTO RICO - DECEMBER 20: A resident, whose home remains without electricity, watches as debris is removed on December 20, 2017 in Morovis, Puerto Rico. Barely three months after Hurricane Maria made landfall, approximately one-third of the devastated island is still without electricity and 14 percent lack running water. While the official death toll from the massive storm remains at 64, The New York Times recently reported the actual toll for the storm and its aftermath likely stands at more than 1,000. Puerto Rico's governor has ordered a review and recount as the holiday season approaches. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:08
Study: Hurricane Maria killed nearly 3,000
Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images
Now playing
02:29
Trump's false claim on Puerto Rico deaths
Jose Andres
CNN
Jose Andres
Now playing
00:57
Jose Andres: Trump should be ashamed
trump fema 09112018
POOL
trump fema 09112018
Now playing
02:29
Trump: The best job we did was Puerto Rico
cooper 9.11
CNN
cooper 9.11
Now playing
04:44
Cooper slams Trump's 'tone-deaf' remarks
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 30:  San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz speaks to the media as she arrives at the temporary government center setup at the Roberto Clemente stadium in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 30, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images South America/Getty Images
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 30: San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz speaks to the media as she arrives at the temporary government center setup at the Roberto Clemente stadium in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 30, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:22
Mayor: If Trump doesn't learn, God bless us all
Stacks upon stacks of bottled water sit near a runway in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, on September 12, 2018.
Julian Quiñones/CNN
Stacks upon stacks of bottled water sit near a runway in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, on September 12, 2018.
Now playing
02:42
See untouched water bottles in Puerto Rico
CNN
Now playing
01:58
CNN anchor presses PR governor on death count
puerto rico governor rossello new day
CNN
puerto rico governor rossello new day
Now playing
00:42
Puerto Rico Gov.: There will be mass exodus
Now playing
01:03
Trees, fences fall as Maria hits Puerto Rico
Residents of San Juan, Puerto Rico, deal with damages to their homes on September 20, 2017, as Hurricane Maria batters the island. 
Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday, cutting power on most of the US territory as terrified residents hunkered down in the face of the island's worst storm in living memory. After leaving a deadly trail of destruction on a string of smaller Caribbean islands, Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico's southeast coast around daybreak, packing winds of around 150mph (240kph).
 / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR RETAMAL        (Photo credit should read HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)
HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images
Residents of San Juan, Puerto Rico, deal with damages to their homes on September 20, 2017, as Hurricane Maria batters the island. Maria slammed into Puerto Rico on Wednesday, cutting power on most of the US territory as terrified residents hunkered down in the face of the island's worst storm in living memory. After leaving a deadly trail of destruction on a string of smaller Caribbean islands, Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico's southeast coast around daybreak, packing winds of around 150mph (240kph). / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR RETAMAL (Photo credit should read HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:44
Hurricane Maria pummels Puerto Rico
(CNN) —  

Puerto Rico is closing 283 schools this summer following a sharp drop in enrollment in the past year, officials said.

Since May, schools have lost 38,762 students as the US territory works to rebuild following a devastating hurricane last year, the education department said in a statement.

“Half of the existing schools are at 60% of their capacity,” it said. The department said only 828 schools will reopen in August.

Education Secretary Julia Keleher said planning to close so many schools was a tough call.

“We know it’s a difficult and painful process. For this reason, we’ve done it in the most sensible way taking in consideration all the elements that could impact the daily lives of some families and the school communities in general,” Keleher said.

The new school year budget includes some repairs to schools.

“Our boys and girls deserve the best education that we are capable of giving them taking into account the fiscal reality of Puerto Rico,” Keleher said.

Before Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20, there already was an unprecedented migration from the Caribbean island to the mainland United States – at least in part because of the US commonwealth’s financial crisis.

The hurricane left millions of Puerto Ricans without power or running water. Schools were closed and jobs lost. Puerto Ricans are American citizens and can move to the states without visas or other paperwork. And so, many did.

In 2016, there were about 2 million more Puerto Ricans living in the mainland United States than in the US territory.

Lyman Stone, an economist working with Puerto Rico to develop population projections, said his early analysis of airline data from the US Department of Transportation shows 179,000 net airline travelers left Puerto Rico for the US between September and November.

Stone estimates the island’s population will continue to shrink. If the island rebounds relatively quickly from Hurricane Maria, then the population will stay closer to 3 million in the next decade. If problems on the island snowball, pushing more people out, Stone estimates Puerto Rico’s population could plunge below 2 million by 2040.