Understanding emotional intelligence and its effects on your life

Experts say emotional intelligence -- the ability to read, understand and respond to emotions in ourselves and others -- is crucial in predicting our health, happiness and success.

Story highlights

  • Emotional intelligence is not only the ability to read our emotions and those of others
  • It's also the ability understand and label those emotions, to express and regulate them

(CNN)You might think you're fairly intelligent, but are you emotionally intelligent?

It's our emotional intelligence that gives us the ability to read our instinctive feelings and those of others. It also allows us to understand and label emotions as well as express and regulate them, according to Yale University's Marc Brackett.
    Most of us would probably like to think that we can do all of the above. We spot and understand emotions in ourselves and others and label them accurately in order to guide our thoughts and actions.
    But many of us tend to overestimate our own emotional intelligence, according to Brackett, a professor in the Child Study Center at Yale and founding director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.
    That's important because experts say the ability to read, understand and respond to emotions in ourselves and other people is a crucial factor in predicting our health, happiness and personal and professional success.
    So maybe we all need to take a breath and invest a little more time in schooling ourselves on what it means to be emotionally intelligent.

    What is emotional intelligence?

    The theory of emotional intelligence -- and the term itself -- originated at Yale and the University of New Hampshire. Peter Salovey, the 23rd president of Yale University, and John "Jack" Mayer, professor of psychology at the University of New Hampshire, wrote up the theory in 1990, Brackett said.
    Their work demonstrated how emotions had a marked impact on an individual's thinking and behavior, said Robin Stern, associate director for the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and an educator, author and licensed psychoanalyst.
    Experts have continued to build on that framework to refine definitions of what exactly is at the core of of emotional intelligence. "Emotional intelligence is being smart about your feelings. It's how to use your emotions to inform your thinking and use your thinking to inform your emotions," she said.