Amanpour: Women everywhere should be able to speak freely about sex and love

Christiane Amanpour traveled the world to look at sex and love from the perspective of women who have not always been heard on these issues.

(CNN)When we started filming the CNN Original Series "Sex & Love Around The World," I was both curious and nervous about what we might find.

It turned out that all along my journey, no matter the country, culture or religion, I heard stories about sex and family honor being used as weapons to silence women and keep them under control. Religion, politics and tradition are often in a conspiracy against love, sexuality and free choice, especially for women.
And yet, I was also encouraged to see signs of change. Everywhere we went, women were having more of a say about sexual satisfaction, consent and connection, and young people were reshaping the idea of modern love.
This series was meant to look at sex and love from the perspective of women who have not always been heard -- and frankly, who have not always been asked these types of questions. I wasn't sure that anyone would actually agree to speak with me on camera, but I was pleasantly surprised by how vocal women were and how much they were willing to share!
    I learned so much talking with dozens of everyday individuals in cities around the world, including a former porn star in Delhi who had just adopted a baby girl, a host in Tokyo who is paid to simply entertain lonely women in sexless marriages, and an actress in Accra who happened to fall in love with a married man.
    So it was quite distressing to hear that one of our contributors, Moesha Boduong, has been the target of public shaming by the Ghanaian press and the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection. Numerous media outlets in Ghana have taken to villainizing this young woman based on an excerpt of the conversation included in a 1 minute, 30 second video of "Sex and Love."