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(CNN) —  

Gab, the tiny social media website used by the accused Pittsburgh synagogue shooter that has become a haven for white supremacists, defends itself as an unbiased home for unfettered speech. But the company has itself taken part in anti-Semitic commentary, deleted tweets show.

When a Twitter user called for Gab to be shut down on August 9, the @getongab account responded with this: “Dude named ‘Krassenstein’ doesn’t support free speech. Imagine my shock.” Half an hour later, Gab’s account shared a Christian Bible verse that refers to Jews who do not believe in Jesus Christ as members of the “synagogue of Satan.”

In September, the Gab Twitter account posted photos of two men: Ken White, a popular lawyer and libertarian blogger, and Benny Polatseck, the founder of a public relations firm that does extensive work for Jewish interests. In the shared photo, Polatseck was in traditional Orthodox Jewish garb, his hair in sidelocks. Gab tweeted: “These two guys show up at your front door. Who do you let in and who do you call the cops on?” The account followed with: “I mean I’m calling the cops on both and getting my shotgun ready, just saying.”

Some who have been monitoring activity on Gab have warned that its lack of rules on hate speech has allowed neo-Nazis and other violent white nationalist groups to share content. Michael Edison Hayden, an open source intelligence analyst at Storyful, noted over the weekend that “the neo-Nazi group Atomwaffen Division and others plotting violence are organizing on that platform out in the open.”