Motorsport

Top 10 most iconic Formula One cars

Updated 1707 GMT (0107 HKT) November 23, 2018
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Despite just eight grand prix wins and a single drivers' title, the paucity of results makes no difference to the 250F's reputation as one of the finest and most graceful F1 cars ever built. Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Introduced halfway through 1962, the Lotus 25 revolutionized racing car construction with the "monocoque" chassis. Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Initially using a BT19 (almost identical to the BT20,) Brabham won four grands prix to take his third title and become the first -- and in all probability -- the only man to win a championship in a car bearing his own name. Bernard Cahier/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
The basic profile of F1 cars was altered forever in 1970 when Colin Chapman produced the Lotus 72. Amazingly, the Lotus 72 continued to be raced by the works team and privateers into 1975, five years after its conception. Norman Quicke/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Strength, simplicity and integrity throughout the M23's wedge-shape design brought Emerson Fittipaldi the title in 1974... Getty Images/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
... before James Hunt replaced the Brazilian and seized the title by a single point from Nicki Lauda two years later. Getty Images/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Christened "Black Beauty" because of its elegant lines and black and gold colors, the Lotus 79 redefined F1 car design and performance. Don Morley/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
The MP4/1 was complex but immensely strong and light -- the two perpetual overarching aims in racing car design. Getty Images/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
The Ferrari 640 (also known as the F1-89) was fast but no one expected it to finish, least of Nigel Mansell as he took the V12-powered car to a remarkable win on its debut in Brazil. Pascal Rondeau/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Williams had been working for some time on different avenues of F1 car development and they all came together in 1992 with the Williams FW14B, one of the most successful and arguably the most sophisticated F1 car of all time. Pascal Rondeau/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Any major change in the technical rules represents opportunity ... but the final key factor was Lewis Hamilton making the bold decision to leave McLaren and align his future with Mercedes. Mark Thompson/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images