How music can change the way you feel and act

This feature is part of Music and Your Mind, a series exploring how music affects your brain. Read part 2 on healing and part 3 on torture.

(CNN)Music is present in every part of our lives. Our spiritual rituals are framed with songs, children learn the alphabet through song and the malls and cafes we visit during our leisure time are rarely silent.

But just how much can this ever-present thing impact us -- and the way we act and feel? Research suggests music can influence us a lot. It can impact illness, depression, spending, productivity and our perception of the world.
Some research has suggested it can increase aggressive thoughts, or encourage crime.
    Recently, a UK study explored how "drill" music -- a genre of rap characterized by threatening lyrics -- might be linked to attention-seeking crime. That's not new, but the emergence of social media allows more recording and sharing.
    The content of these songs is about gang rivalry, and unlike other genres, the audience might judge the performer based on whether he will follow through with what he claims in his lyrics, writes the study's author, Craig Pinkney, a criminologist and lecturer at the University College Birmingham, in the UK.
    Beside music, the paper looks at social media's role in fueling violence. The online platforms readily used by many, have given gang rivalries the chance to move online and encourage comments from supporters and opposing groups, which only adds to the pressure to react.
    However, there are multiple reasons for the rise in crime, according to Pinkney. He explains that poverty, deprivation, racism, poor leadership, lack of corporate investments, lack of opportunities and resources also contribute.
    Daniel Levitin, professor of psychology and music at McGill University in Canada, points out that it is difficult to analyze whether music can create violence.
    Studies have very mixed evidence, and mostly use observational data instead of controlled experiments that can take into account people's personality. People who are already prone to violence might be drawn to violent music, Levitin explained. But that doesn't mean everybody who enjoys hat music is violent.
    "When you've got violent behaviors that mimic something that's out there in the music or art world it's easy to jump to the conclusion that the art caused the person to become violent," he added. "But just because it's easy to conclude it doesn't mean that it's true."
    How does this song make you feel?
    Fact: Some experts argue violent lyrics, across music genres, can incite aggressive thoughts.

    -

    Energized

    -

    Stressed

    -

    Calm

    -

    Unaffected

    Another paper, published in 2003 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, reported that music can incite aggressive thoughts and feelings. During five experiments with 75 female and 70 male college students, those who heard a violent song were shown to feel more host