America is having a moment ... will you be part of it?

Don Lemon anchors 'CNN Tonight with Don Lemon' airing weeknights at 10pm. He also serves as a correspondent across CNN/U.S. programming. Lemon joined CNN in September 2006.

(CNN)People are protesting in the streets — they're angry, exhausted and scared by what they see happening in America. They want to know how we got here ... and how we move forward. And I'm ready to have that conversation, too.

Today, I launched "Silence Is Not an Option," a new podcast that will be an ongoing discussion about how we oppose racism — in fact, how we become anti-racist — and move toward building that "more perfect union" we were promised but that's never really been available to all. Now is the time that history books will write about — and we are living in it.
Don Lemon served as a moderator at the CNN Democratic Presidential Debate in Detroit in 2019.
What can we do with this opportunity while so many people are open to listening and maybe, more importantly, receptive to change?
    To start, we all have a lot to learn about why things are the way they are, and even more to unlearn if we're really going to make things better. You might have questions that you're afraid to ask because you're embarrassed or don't want to offend anyone, but we've got to be able to ask those questions or we'll never get to an answer.
    Some of you are saying, "This podcast isn't for me. I'm not racist. I voted for Obama. I don't say the n-word. I'm nice to the Black people at work. I have a Black friend or even a Black partner or spouse."
    But racism isn't all about white hoods and burning crosses — it's a white woman walking her dog and unnecessarily calling the police on a Black man. By that I mean, it's not the obvious racism that we already know is out there, it's the next level that we've got to get to — our own unconscious, ingrained racism.
    In the first episode of the podcast, I speak with Ibram X. Kendi, author of the bestselling book "How to Be an Antiracist" and professor of history and international relations at American University.
    Kendi, who joins Boston University's faculty on July 1 and will launch the BU Center for Antiracist Research, has said anti-racism means "the willingness to define terms, and to hold oneself accountable, to admit the times in which we're being racist. But even more importantly, to strive to hold antiracist ideas, meaning that all the racial groups are equals."