How can we embrace race? Learn from this couple advocating for change

In 2016, Melissa Giraud and Andrew Grant-Thomas created EmbraceRace, an online collection of resources for parents, educators and kids that has grown into a community of people who care about race, justice and the future of our democracy.

Lisa Selin Davis is the author of "Tomboy: The Surprising History and Future of Girls Who Dare to Be Different." She has written The New York Times, CNN, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian and many other publications.

(CNN)Years before George Floyd's murder by police officer Derek Chauvin in the streets of Minneapolis propelled people around the world to protest systemic racism, Melissa Giraud and Andrew Grant-Thomas had been working on similar goals, in a different way.

Married since 2002, they've been teaching families, educators and community members not just to talk about race, but to understand the dire reasons they need to come together to fight racism.
Giraud, who has worked as an educator and National Public Radio producer, is the biracial daughter of immigrants. Grant-Thomas, a Black man of Jamaican origin, born on the Fourth of July, is, as he put it, a "longtime racial justice guy."
    As parents of two daughters, ages 9 and 12, together they created EmbraceRace, an online collection of resources for parents, educators and kids, in 2016. It has become a blossoming community of people who care about race, justice and the future of our democracy.
    CNN: What prompted you to start EmbraceRace?
    Melissa Giraud: In 2015, when our kids were in preschool, they were confronting some of the same things they would have confronted 50 years ago — things we confronted as kids — who's valued at school, who's in charge and who's not, who's represented in ads, books and movies.
    We really wanted to find support, but articles for parents tended to be about how to talk to White kids about school shootings or Charlottesville. They didn't discuss how to do it for kids from targeted groups.
    We thought, if we're having a hard time, having worked in racial justice for years, other parents must really be struggling to find resources. That's when we started to imagine EmbraceRace.
    Andrew Grant-Thomas: I