Unpopular teens could be at higher risk of heart conditions later in life, study suggests

Thirteen-year-olds who weren't very popular with their peers growing up seem to have a higher risk of developing circulatory system disease in later life, a study released Tuesday has found.

(CNN)Many of us hope to escape who we were in high school -- particularly if you were last in line to be picked in gym class -- but a growing body of research suggests that how popular you are in adolescence has a link with psychological and physical health decades later.

Thirteen-year-olds who weren't very popular with their peers growing up, a new study released Tuesday has found, seem to have a heightened risk of developing circulatory system disease in later life. This includes higher risk for conditions such as narrowed and hardened arteries and abnormal heartbeat that affect the normal functioning of the heart and blood vessels.
"Although not many realize it, peer status is one of the strongest predictors of later psychological and health outcomes, even decades later, said Mitch Prinstein, the John Van Seters distinguished professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina.