How Chile became a leader in Covid-19 vaccination

SANTIAGO, CHILE - JANUARY 28: : President of Chile Sebastian Piñera walks next to a vaccine container during the arrival of around 1.92 million of CoronaVac vaccine doses of the SINOVAC laboratory from Beijing, China, at Arturo Merino Benitez International Airport on January 28, 2021 in Santiago, Chile. Chilean Institute of Public Health approved the emergency use of the Chinese Sinovac vaccine for adults between 18 and 59 years old. (Photo by Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images)

(CNN)It was late May. The world was helplessly watching as the Covid-19 pandemic advanced unimpeded country after country in what would later be called "the first wave" of infections. After China, Italy and the UK had become the virus hotspots, cities in the United States, especially New York, followed. And then in late spring, the coronavirus spread throughout South America.

By May 27, Chile, along with Peru, had reached the world's highest infection rates per capita over a seven-day rolling average, according to Our World in Data (OWID), an independent statistics website headquartered at Oxford University. Chile was rapidly approaching 80,000 infections and more than 800 people had already died by then.
    Fast forward nine months and the Chile is in a totally different category. While some Latin American countries like Nicaragua have yet to receive any vaccine, the Andean nation of 19 million had already given more than one million vaccine doses by February 9th. It hit two-million Monday and the immunization pace continues to improve.
      Where South America's race for coronavirus vaccines stands