Meet 'dragon man,' the latest addition to the human family tree

This illustration shows what Homo longi -- dragon man -- may have looked like.

(CNN)A cranium hidden at the bottom of a well in northeastern China for more than 80 years may belong to a new species of early human that researchers have called "dragon man."

The exciting discovery is the latest addition to a human family tree that is rapidly growing and shifting, thanks to new fossil finds and analysis of ancient DNA preserved in teeth, bones and cave dirt.
The well-preserved skullcap, found in the Chinese city of Harbin, is between 138,000 and 309,000 years old, according to geochemical analysis, and it combines primitive features, such as a broad nose and low brow and braincase, with those that are more similar to Homo sapiens, including flat and delicate cheekbones.
    The ancient hominin -- which researchers said was "probably" a 50-year-old man -- would have had an "extremely wide" face, deep eyes with large eye sockets, big teeth and a brain similar in size to modern humans.
      Three papers detailing the find were published in the journal The Innovation on Friday.
      "The Harbin skull is the most important fossil I've seen in 50 years. It shows how important East Asia and China is in telling the human story," said Chris Stringer, research leader in human origins at The Natural History Museum in London and coauthor of the research.
      Researchers named the new hominin Homo longi, which is derived from Heilongjiang, or Black Dragon River, the province where the cranium was found.
        The team plans to see if it's possible to extract ancient proteins or DNA from the cranium, which included one tooth, and will begin a more detailed study of the skull's interior, looking at sinuses and both ear and brain shape, using CT scans.
        Dragon man's large size could be an adaptation to the harsh environment in which he likely lived, researchers said.

        We are family

        It's easy to think of Homo sapiens as unique, but there was a time when we weren't the only humans on the block.
        In the millennia since Homo sapiens first emerged in Africa about 300,000 years ago, we have shared the planet with Neanderthals, the enigmatic Denisovans, the "hobbit" Homo floresiensis, Homo luzonensis and Homo naledi, as well as several other ancient hominins. We had sex with some of them and produced babies. Some of these ancestors are well represented in the fossil record, but most of what we know about Denisovans comes from genetic information in our DNA.
        The story of human evolution is changing all the time in what is a particularly exciting period for paleoanthropology, Stringer said.
        The announcement of dragon man's discovery comes a day after a different group researchers published a paper in the journal Science on fossils found in Israel, which they said also could represent another new type of early human.
        The jaw bone and skull fragment suggested a group of people lived in the Middle East 120,000 to 420,000 years ago wi