Israel and the West Bank are on edge again. Here are five things you need to know

Mourners carry the body of 67-year-old Menahem Yehezkel in the southern Israeli city of Beersheba.  Yehezkel was killed on March 22 in a knife attack.

Jerusalem (CNN)A series of terror attacks and violent incidents have put Israel and the Palestinian territories on edge again.

In just one week, 11 people were killed in three attacks in Israeli towns and cities. It was the deadliest week Israel had seen in years and follows weeks of rising tensions that saw Israelis targeted in stabbing attacks and several Palestinians shot dead by Israeli forces in the West Bank.
The overlap of three major religious holidays over the next month -- Ramadan, Passover and Easter -- could heighten tensions further, exacerbating a potent mix of factors that could spark yet another cycle of violence.
    Here are five things you need to know about the recent uptick in violence.

      Attacks hit deep in Israel

      The lethal attacks took place not in the typical hot spots, disputed areas like Jerusalem or the West Bank, much of which is considered by the international community to be occupied territory. Instead they happened in Israeli towns and cities that are not used to such violence.
      Unusually, two of the attacks were carried out by Israeli-Arabs. On March 22, an Israeli-Arab killed four Israeli civilians in a stabbing and ramming attack in the southern city of Be'er Sheva, Israeli police said. The attacker had previously been imprisoned for supporting ISIS.
        On Sunday, two Israeli-Arab men killed two border police officers and wounded six passersby in the northern city of Hadera, local media reported. The two were also affiliated with ISIS, which claimed responsibility for the incident -- the first such ISIS claim for an attack in Israel since 2017.
        Then on Tuesday night, a Palestinian from the West Bank shot and killed five people in Bnei Brak, a mostly Orthodox city just east of Tel Aviv. Two of those killed were Ukrainian citizens, two were Israeli civilians and one was a police officer who responded to the scene, according to Israeli police. In all three cases the attackers were shot and killed by either civilians or security forces.
        Emergency personnel and Israeli security forces at the scene of a shooting in Bnei Brak on March 29.

        Tensions rising in the West Bank and Jerusalem

        Tensions had already been on the rise for weeks, even before the three attacks. There had been several stabbings carried out by Palestinians against Israelis in Jerusalem in March and several Palestinians, including teenagers, had been shot dead by Israeli forces in the West Bank during clashes over the past several weeks.
        The security situation is escalating. While many of the recent attacks targeted police or military forces within Jerusalem's Old City, the most recent stabbing targeted an Israeli out for a jog in a popular neighborhood outside the Old City. Two of the three attacks in the past week targeted civilians.
        The cycle of violence has continued since then. On Thursday, two Palestinians -- including one teenager -- were killed and 15 others wounded during an Israeli police raid in the West Bank city of Jenin targeting suspects connected to the Bnei Brak shooting. The family home of the attacker has also been scheduled for demolition, Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said, a standard practice by Israeli forces to "create deterrence" (the Israeli Army says families can try to appeal demolitions).
        A few hours later, an Israeli was stabbed on a bus in the West Bank just south of Bethlehem. The attacker, a Palestinian, was shot dead by an armed civilian on the bus, the Israeli military said.
        And for months, Palestinian and Israeli activists have warned that violence against Palestinians carried out by Israeli setters is at an all-time high. Israel's Defense Minister Benny Gantz has vowed to treat settler violence with a "heavy hand," calling perpetrators "terrorists" and promising special military teams that are supposed to help monitor areas where clashes tend to erupt -- although most Palestinians are already wary of the Israeli military, saying they believe they only help protect settlers.