Hong Kong protests over China extradition bill

6:18 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Police appear to target journalists

Video appears to show police using long range pepper spray on a photojournalist who got too close to them.

Galileo Cheng told CNN he took the video while standing on Harcourt Road Flyover with his photographer friends.

“Basically, police first tried tear gas -- no use as Hong Kongers are used to it. Then they took out AR15 (rifles) and fired at people getting too close. I couldn’t tell the type of bullet but mostly rubber bullets or paint bullets. Bean bags is not used near PLA (Chinese People's Liberation Army Forces Hong Kong) headquarters. Crowd scattered now and gathered near Admiralty Centre side. I’m now at AIA tower near central. Situation is calmer now.”

6:06 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Protesters shelter in high-end mall

Protesters inside Pacific Place shopping mall.
Protesters inside Pacific Place shopping mall. Julia Hollingsworth

The glitzy, high-end Pacific Place mall is packed with young protestors, many wearing black shirts and face masks, and yelling in the usually quiet mall foyer.

Hundreds of protestors were driven back into the mall by the police's use of tear gas outside.

Now Pacific Place is packed with people, and there’s a sense of restlessness and frustration. Many have red eyes or faces from the gas outside, and groups are staying close to one another, trying not to lose each other in the tide of people. 

Chi Chan, a 30-year-old office clerk, was one of the people pushed back from a walkway into Pacific Place. Sirens were ringing in the mall as she entered, set off by the gas outside.

Her boss let her leave work early to join the protest, and she arrived at 2.30 p.m., right before the gas began to fly.

Protesters take shelter outside Tiffany & Co. at Pacific Place mall.
Protesters take shelter outside Tiffany & Co. at Pacific Place mall. Julia Hollingsworth

She said she had come because was concerned by the Chinese legal systems’ lack of transparency, and said in the last five years Beijing had tried to influence Hong Kong too much.

Although Wednesday looked like it could be the beginning of another Umbrella movement, she said it would be more difficult for protestors to pull it off this time around -- the government and authorities had learnt from past experience.

“It’s not that easy,” she said.

The Pacific Place mall is packed with young protestors, many wearing black shirts and face masks.
The Pacific Place mall is packed with young protestors, many wearing black shirts and face masks. Julia Hollingsworth

6:27 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Police push protesters back along Harcourt Road

The use of force by the Hong Kong police has succeeded in driving back protesters from Harcourt Road in front of the Legislative Council, the center of the unrest earlier in the day.

On Wednesday morning, this was the scene in the center of Harcourt Road.

CNN/Ben Westcott
CNN/Ben Westcott

By dusk, it was an altogether different image, as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets to push the crowds back, away from the government complex.

CNN/Maisy Mok
CNN/Maisy Mok

6:26 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Tear gas enters subway station

Images on social media appear to show panic in Hong Kong's Admiralty station as tear gas begins to drift into the subway, effecting passengers during the peak rush hour period.

The district where the protest is taking place is in the heart of the downtown area, close to the city's financial hub.

Police have cautioned residents to stay away from the protest area, but due to the relatively small size and compact nature of Hong Kong, this isn't always possible.

5:32 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Police face barrage from protesters

Protesters are seen throwing bits of debris at police as they try to come down the stairs of a walkway onto Harcourt Road.

5:09 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Footage shows tear gas being fired into the crowd

5:22 a.m. ET, June 12, 2019

Police use rubber bullets, bean bags, call protest a 'riot'

Protesters clash with police during a demonstration outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12.
Protesters clash with police during a demonstration outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong on June 12. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Commissioner of Hong Kong Police Steven Lo Wai-chung has confirmed that police have used a range of weapons -- including rubber bullets -- to suppress protests in the city center.

Alongside rubber bullets police have used tear gas, batons, pepper spray, pepper-spray solution and bean-bag rounds on Wednesday, Lo confirmed.

Lo defended the use of the heavy-duty emergency weapons by labelling the protest "a riot."

He said the protesters had attacked police lines and left officers with "no choice but to start to use force." He added that the pro-democracy protesters had used sharpened iron bars and bricks, resulting in injuries to a number of officers.

He urged residents not to enter the city's Admiralty area.