Hong Kong protest sees hundreds of thousands call for city's leader to step down

11:22 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Do You Hear The People Sing?

“Do You Hear The People Sing?,” a song from musical Les Misérables and the anthem of Hong Kong protests in 2014, has resurfaced in demonstrations over the controversial China extradition bill.

A large group of demonstrators belted out the song in unison under a footbridge next to the police headquarters Sunday afternoon in Hong Kong. Crowds circling the singers cheered: "Encore!" 

The rousing chorus: “Do you hear the people sing?/Singing the songs of angry men?/It is the music of the people/Who will not be slaves again!” is sung in the musical as students prepare to launch an anti-monarchist rebellion in the streets of Paris.

In recent years it has been picked up as the soundtrack for demonstrations from Ukraine to the US.

9:59 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong leader admits government "deficiencies" had disappointed the people

Faced with yet another huge protest over her handling of the China extradition bill, Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam issued a rare apology Sunday night. 

Hours after the demonstrations started, the government said in a statement that Lam had admitted "deficiencies" in the government's work had led to "substantial controversies and disputes in society, causing disappointment and grief among the people."

Full statement from a government spokesman:

Over the past two Sundays, a large number of people have expressed their views during public processions. The Government understands that these views have been made out of love and care for Hong Kong. 
The Chief Executive clearly heard the views expressed in a peaceful and rational manner. She acknowledged that this embodied the spirit of Hong Kong as a civilised, free, open and pluralistic society that values mutual respect, harmony and diversity. The Government also respects and treasures these core values of Hong Kong. 
Having regard to the strong and different views in society, the Government has suspended the legislative amendment exercise at the full Legislative Council with a view to restoring calmness in society as soon as possible and avoiding any injuries to any persons. The Government reiterated that there is no timetable for restarting the process. 
The Chief Executive admitted that the deficiencies in the Government's work had led to substantial controversies and disputes in society, causing disappointment and grief among the people. The Chief Executive apologised to the people of Hong Kong for this and pledged to adopt a most sincere and humble attitude to accept criticisms and make improvements in serving the public. 
9:57 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong protesters reoccupy the street they were thrown off just days ago

Large numbers of young protesters have regrouped on the same street they were expelled from by police just days earlier, with tear gas and rubber bullets.

Sitting peacefully on Harcourt Road, black-clad protesters said they were considering staying for hours or even overnight on the usually busy street.

Protesters begin to sit down on Harcourt Court next to the Legislative Council on Sunday.
Protesters begin to sit down on Harcourt Court next to the Legislative Council on Sunday. CNN/James Griffiths

Harcourt Road runs through the middle of Hong Kong's affluent Admiralty district, alongside the city's Legislative Council building. It was one of the main sites of 2014's Occupy protests.

The mood Sunday was completely different to earlier in the week, with a tiny almost invisible police presence and relaxed crowd, almost none of whom were wearing face coverings or helmets and other safety gear.

Outside the central government offices a large crowd called for Carrie Lam to resign but even there the mood was far less hostile than Wednesday and no one was obviously equipped for renewed skirmishes with police.

While the mood could change, Hong Kongers appear to have not only come out in great numbers, but shown they can do so completely peacefully.

Protesters being physically expelled from Harcourt Road by police on Wednesday using tear gas and riot gear.
Protesters being physically expelled from Harcourt Road by police on Wednesday using tear gas and riot gear. CNN/Julia Hollingsworth

9:30 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong protester who fell to his death remembered

Near the glitzy Pacific Place mall, piles of white flowers have been left stacked beside the road and on the concrete divider in memory of a protester who died on Saturday morning.

While demonstrators were encouraged to wear black on Sunday, many also pinned white flowers to their chests in his memory.

In the early hours of Saturday morning, while holding banners opposing the China extradition bill, the man fell from a podium in Hong Kong's Admiralty district.

CNN/Helen Regan
CNN/Helen Regan

He was rushed to hospital but died soon after, Hong Kong police said. Many of the exact circumstances that led to his death still remained unclear Sunday night.

But protesters were clearly prepared to honor his memory.

A second memorial was set up near the Legislative Council offices on Harcourt Road on Sunday, complete with the yellow raincoat which became a symbol of Wednesday's protests.

"He sacrificed a lot for us," 16-year-old school student Athena told CNN.

CNN/James Griffiths
CNN/James Griffiths

9:12 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

If you're just joining us ...

The sun has set in Hong Kong and there is still no end in sight for a mass demonstration that has brought the city's streets to a standstill.  

The suspension of a controversial bill that would allow extradition to China was not enough to stop protesters from turning out in huge numbers. Organizers estimate the crowds could be even bigger than last Sunday, when as many as 1.03 million people rallied in the city.

Instead of being assuaged by the postponement of the extradition bill, demonstrators seem to be more energized than ever. They’re demanding that the bill be scrapped entirely and that Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam step down over her handling of the issue.

Chants of “Lam resign” and “withdraw the bill" could be heard reverberating across the sea of peaceful protesters as night fell.

Many of those demonstrating are also outraged over perceived police brutality during Wednesday’s protest, which Lam described as a “riot.”

Lam has promised to "keep improving and serve the citizens," acknowledging many people were angry and upset, but whether her apology will be enough to assuage protesters remains to be seen.

9:06 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong extradition protest in signs

Carl Court/Getty Images
Carl Court/Getty Images
Carl Court/Getty Images
Carl Court/Getty Images
CNN/Helen Regan
CNN/Helen Regan
CNN/Stephy Chung
CNN/Stephy Chung
Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images
Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

10:22 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Crowds are jubilant despite slow progress

It’s gone 9 p.m. (9 a.m. ET) in Hong Kong and still many of the streets are packed with protesters.

In the city’s Admiralty area, the final stop on the protest route, thousands of people continue to stream down the main street, as songs and chants fill the air.

Crowds continue to surge through Hong Kong late into Sunday night.
Crowds continue to surge through Hong Kong late into Sunday night. CNN/Helen Regan

Many are holding their phones aloft, creating a sea of bright shining lights. The mood is jubilant, even celebratory, despite slow progress and huge crowds.

Earlier as an ambulance approached, the crowd was forced to part, squeezing onto sidewalks and huddling tightly together.

After the ambulance had successfully passed a huge cheer erupted from the crowd.

9:31 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong protest organizers: "Never seen such a big crowd"

Large crowds participate in Sunday's protest march in Hong Kong.
Large crowds participate in Sunday's protest march in Hong Kong. Helen Regan/CNN

One of the organizers of Sunday's protest have told CNN they had “never seen such a big crowd” in Hong Kong. 

Bonnie Leung, of the Civil Human Rights Front, told CNN that her team is counting the number of people at check points around the city and an estimate is expected at 10 p.m. local time (9 a.m.ET). 

Despite the large crowds there is a relatively minimal police presence, with officers directing traffic, but no sign yet of helmets or gas masks. 

Sunday’s march has been mainly peaceful, with many families with children taking part. 

Kevin Yam, from Hong Kong's Progressive Lawyer Group, told CNN the protest size could yet be even larger than last Sunday's record breaking gathering -- when protest organizers estimated more than a million people took to the streets. 

"If the cops have opened up many more roads than last week and all the protesters are still stuck and the train stations are still overfilled that’s a real sign," he said.

8:55 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong leader apologizes as protests continue

Chief Executive Carrie Lam announcing on Saturday that the extradition bill would be suspended after protests.
Chief Executive Carrie Lam announcing on Saturday that the extradition bill would be suspended after protests. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Chief Executive Carrie Lam has issued a statement apologizing to the citizens of Hong Kong amid mass protests calling for her resignation.

In a statement Sunday, Lam said that she would listen to criticisms from the voters in "the most sincere and humble manner."

Tens of thousands of protesters are still on the streets of Hong Kong calling for Lam's resignation over her handling of the China extradition bill crisis, as well as deep resentment over her decision to call Wednesday's protest a "riot."

Lam said that she promised to "keep improving and serve the citizens," acknowledging many people were angry and upset.

But it has yet to be seen if Lam's apology will be enough for the thousands of deeply dissatisfied protesters.