European elections results 2019

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7:45 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

British far-right activist Tommy Robinson blames social media ban for EU defeat

British far-right activist Tommy Robinson, who failed in his attempt to become a member of the European Parliament, has blamed social media for his defeat.

British far-right activist Tommy Robinson (real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon) speaks to supporters outside the Old Bailey in London on May 14.
British far-right activist Tommy Robinson (real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon) speaks to supporters outside the Old Bailey in London on May 14. Peter Summers/Getty Images

Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon received only 38,908 votes in the North West England region, according to Britain's Press Association news agency -- putting him in eighth place.

"Trump won his campaign on social media. Brexit was won on social media. I'm banned from social media," Robinson said after arriving at the vote count in Manchester on Sunday, according to PA.

"My ability to fight a fair campaign is gone, orchestrated and organized by the Government.

 "I feel like I have been fighting with my hands tied behind my back."

He told his followers on the private messaging app Telegram that he was "disappointed" as the results rolled in, and vowed to "carry on fighting."

Instagram and Facebook banned Robinson, 35, from both platforms because he posted anti-Muslim content and engaged in activity offline supporting hate figures and groups, Facebook said in a statement in February.

He attracted thousands of followers online and at protests and became a figurehead for the far-right in Britain.

7:42 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

More key takeaways: Predicted surge in support for far-right populist groups did not materialize

Over four days last week, voters across 28 countries delivered the highest turnout in a European election for 20 years as they selected new representatives to sit in the European Parliament.

Here are a few key takeaways:

  1. Results in France provided further evidence that a predicted surge in support for far-right populist parties did not materialize. Marine Le Pen's far-right National Rally won with 23.31% of the votes, according to the French Ministry of Interior. However Le Pen's vote share was a slight decrease compared to 2014, when her Front National party gained 24.86% of the vote.
  2. In Italy, the right-wing Lega party, led by Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini, claimed victory with 33.64% of the vote. Euroskeptic Salvini said he would try to form an anti-EU bloc with Marine Le Pen and Hungary's Viktor Orban. It's unclear if that will materialize.
  3. Orban, Hungary's far-right nationalist prime minister, scored a huge win -- his Fidesz party received 52.14% of the country's votes. That's more than three times the amount of support for the second most popular party, the left-wing Democratic Coalition, which received just 16.26%.
  4. Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said he would call a snap election after a poor performance by his party in European and local elections.

Read more about what the European elections revealed after some unexpected outcomes here:

6:46 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

The latest European Parliament projection

Here's the latest projection for the European Parliament for 2019-2024, which is subject to change as final results come in:

European Parliament projection for 2019-2024
European Parliament projection for 2019-2024 European Parliament

6:57 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Some key takeaways from the European election 2019 results

Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage and President of the National Rally, Marine Le Pen.
Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage and President of the National Rally, Marine Le Pen. AFP/Getty Images

The results of the European elections revealed some unexpected outcomes on Monday as the full picture from the world's biggest multi-country vote became clearer.

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  1. Traditional centrist parties took a drubbing, with the so-called Grand Coalition -- which consists of the center-left Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) bloc and the center-right European People's Party (EPP) -- losing more than 70 seats and its majority in the EU parliament. 
  2. In the UK, the Brexit Party, led by arch-Brexiteer Nigel Farage, took home 31.71% of the vote. This is almost equivalent to the vote share of the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats combined and reflects growing dissatisfaction with traditional UK parties. 
  3. Spain's Socialist party recorded another strong performance following a general election win in late April, winning 32.84% of the vote. 
  4. The Green Party alliance posted its strongest ever performance in European elections, winning 70 seats and taking 9.32% of the vote -- a rise from 2014 when they took 50 seats.
8:56 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Knives and daggers: UK papers react

UK newspapers have reacted to the EU election results by splashing the "humiliating" result as "voters turn against" the Conservative and Labor Party, while calling Nigel Farage's Brexit Party surge an "emphatic victory."

The Times said Farage's win had sent the Tories and Labor party "into meltdown" while the Daily Mail said the Brexit Party's success had plunged a "dagger" into the Conservatives, with a picture of Farage and the clear favorite to become Theresa May's successor, Boris Johnson.

"Farage plunges dagger ... as civil war breaks out over PM front-runner's No Deal stance. Knives out for Boris," it wrote.

The Daily Telegraph called Farage's win a "humiliation for Tories" and points out that as the Brexit Party surged, the Conservatives and Labor lost ground, and the Liberal-Democrats gained seats, Britain is more "polarized" than ever before.

While the tabloid, the Daily Express, led with the splash "Now give us the Brexit we voted for!"

6:36 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Voter turnout across the 28 EU countries

Voter turnout was much higher this year than ever before, the European Parliament has revealed.

In total there was a turnout of 50.82%, up from 42.61% in the previously election in 2014.

Take a look at the full country breakdown below:

Turnout by country for the European elections
Turnout by country for the European elections European Parliament

5:29 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Germany sees 13.3% rise in voter turnout

Robert Habeck (L), co-leader of the German Greens Party, speak after they became Germany's second strongest party in Germany's European elections.
Robert Habeck (L), co-leader of the German Greens Party, speak after they became Germany's second strongest party in Germany's European elections. Sean Gallup

Voter turnout in Germany was significantly higher than in the previous European election, reaching 61.4% compared to 48.1% during the 2014 ballot, according to preliminary results shared by the German government.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats (CDU) and coalition partner, the Social Democratic Party (SPD), suffered sharp swings away as voters turned towards the Greens -- which clinched second place.

According to Monday's preliminary results, CDU came in top with 22.6%, a drop from the 30% it gained in 2014.

The Greens saw their support rise to 20.5% from 10.7%, while the SDP fell to 15.8% from 27.3% in 2014.

The far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party also made gains with 11% compared to 7.1% in the last vote.

The final results in Germany will be presented later on Monday.

4:38 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Le Pen win 'not a failure for Macron,' government spokesperson says

France's European election results were “a disappointment for us” but they're "not a failure for Macron,” French government spokeswoman Sibeth Ndiaye told BFMTV on Monday.

French President Emmanuel Macron’s La République En Marche, which gained 22.41% of the votes, was bested by Marine Le Pen's far-right National Rally, with 23.31%.

Ndiaye told the French broadcaster that "the fight is ahead of us,” but added that Macron would not dissolve the National Assembly nor would French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe resign.

She added that on a European level, La République En Marche "will undoubtedly work with the greens,” which posted its strongest ever showing in European elections by taking 9.32% of the vote, according to provisional results.

3:43 a.m. ET, May 27, 2019

Farage's Brexit Party to participate in future UK elections

Off the back of his success in the European elections, Nigel Farage said his newly-formed Brexit Party will stand in the next UK general elections -- whenever they will be.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today program, Farage said the Brexit Party would contest all 650 seats with a full manifesto. "The work begins today," he said.