April 26, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Aditi Sangal, Maureen Chowdhury, Meg Wagner, Melissa Macaya, Jessie Yeung, Andrew Raine, Ben Morse and Jack Guy, CNN

Updated 8:21 a.m. ET, April 27, 2022
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8:34 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Ukraine situation is a "catalyst" for "great number of problems," Russia's foreign minister tells UN secretary-general

From CNN's Radina Gigova

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov attends a meeting with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in Moscow, Russia, on April 26.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov attends a meeting with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres in Moscow, Russia, on April 26. (Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images)

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Tuesday the situation around Ukraine "has become a catalyst" for "a great number of problems," and therefore Russia responded "expeditiously" to the request by UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres for talks. 

"We definitely appreciate your desire to have another round of talks at this hard time," Lavrov told Guterres at the beginning of a meeting in Moscow aimed to discuss the situation in Ukraine and its global impact.  

Lavrov said the meeting between Guterres and Russian President Vladimir Putin later Tuesday "emphasizes the significance that we attach to our contacts with the United Nations."

Guterres told Lavrov, "we are extremely interested" in finding ways to create conditions for effective dialogue, for a ceasefire "as soon as possible" and "conditions for a peaceful solution."

UN Secretary-General Guterres, left, meets Lavrov, right, in Moscow, Russia, on April 26.
UN Secretary-General Guterres, left, meets Lavrov, right, in Moscow, Russia, on April 26. (Maxim Shipenkov/Reuters)

"I know today we are facing a complex situation in Ukraine, different interpretations about what is happening in Ukraine, but that does not limit the possibility to have a very serious dialogue on how best we can work to minimize the suffering of people," Guterres said. 

"These are also very deep interests that I have in the present moment -- to do everything possible to end the war as soon as possible, and to do everything possible to minimize the suffering of the people and to address the impacts of the vulnerable populations" in other parts of the world as well that have been impacted by the war. 

"It is very important to support all countries around the world in relation to food, in relation to energy, in relation to finance," Guterres said. 

7:05 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

It's 2 p.m. in Kyiv. Here's what you need to know.

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin speaks during a meeting with members of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at the US Air Base in Ramstein, western Germany, on April 26.
US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin speaks during a meeting with members of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at the US Air Base in Ramstein, western Germany, on April 26. (Andre Pain/AFP/Getty Images)

Diplomatic efforts continue, with Germany agreeing to send anti-aircraft tanks to Ukraine, and a third mass grave has been found near Mariupol.

Here are the latest developments:

  • US Defense Secretary slams Russia: Moscow's invasion and atrocities in Ukraine are "indefensible" as Russia has bombed hospitals and left children "traumatized," US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said Tuesday. He was speaking from Ramstein US Air Base in Germany, where the US is hosting Ukraine-focused defense talks.
  • Germany to ship arms to Ukraine: Germany will deliver Gepard anti-aircraft tanks to Ukraine, the German Ministry of Defence announced on Tuesday. The move was announced by German Defence Minister Christine Lambrecht at Ramstein US Airforce base, the ministry tweeted.
  • Explosions in Transnistria: Two radio towers in Moldova's unrecognized breakaway territory of Transnistria were damaged by explosions in the early hours of Tuesday morning, the Transnistrian Ministry of Internal Affairs said in a statement.
  • More refugees to flee: A projected 8.3 million refugees are expected to flee Ukraine, according to the latest assessment by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Around 5.2 million refugees had left Ukraine as of Monday, the latest UNHCR data shows.
  • Third mass grave found near Mariupol: A third mass grave has been found near Mariupol, said Vadym Boichenko, the mayor of the besieged southeastern city. New satellite imagery has shown a mass grave at the village of Staryi Krym, according to the Telegram channel of the city authorities.
  • UN diplomacy: UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is arriving in Moscow on Tuesday to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Russian foreign minister. He will then travel to Kyiv to meet Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and the Ukrainian foreign minister on Thursday.
  • "Sham referendum": Russia announced it will stage a referendum in the broader occupied Kherson region on Wednesday, asking people to approve the "independence" of a new entity called "the Kherson People’s Republic." Zelensky has called it a "sham referendum," saying civilians have already shown "their attitude toward the occupiers" by protesting in occupied towns.
  • Curfew in the capital: Kyiv will be placed under a nighttime curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time, Monday through Friday, this week to protect civilians from Russia's "provocative actions," said the head of the city's Regional Military Administration. Those working in critical infrastructure or who have a special permit are exempt.
6:28 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Mariupol mayor says three mass graves around city, claims locals forced to work at sites

From CNN's Tim Lister and Olga Voitovych

A satellite image shows the expansion of new graves at a cemetery in Vynohradne, near Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 29.
A satellite image shows the expansion of new graves at a cemetery in Vynohradne, near Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 29. (Maxar Technologies/Reuters)

A third mass grave has been found near Mariupol, the mayor of the besieged southeastern city told Ukrainian television Tuesday.

In addition to mass graves uncovered in the villages of Mangush and Vynohradne, "now we see there is another one," said Vadym Boichenko.

New satellite imagery has shown a mass grave at the village of Staryi Krym, according to the Telegram channel of the city authorities.

The images showed excavated trenches on the territory of the Old Crimean cemetery, the city council said on Telegram.

They appeared on March 24, after the village was occupied by the Russians, and were about 60 to 70 meters long, the council said.

By April 7, according to new imagery, part of the trenches had been covered, the council said, and the burial area had grown. 

"New trenches were recorded on April 24. The length of the mass grave has increased to more than 200 meters," it said.

Boichenko accused Russian forces of involving the local population in mass burials in exchange for food.

"They [the locals] told us that you have to work 'hours' to have food and water. Now there is not enough humanitarian aid in Mariupol so people are forced to do it," he said on Telegram. 

CNN is unable to confirm the city's account of the mass graves. The images, from Planet Labs, were first reported by Radio Free Europe (RFE/RL) on Monday.

CNN has reviewed satellite imagery purportedly showing mass graves at Vynohradne, but it is unclear beyond the disturbance of the ground what may have transpired there.

Last week, Ukrainian officials identified the location of mass graves at Manhush near Mariupol after the publication of satellite images collected by and analyzed by Maxar Technologies. 

Petro Andriushchenko, an advisor to the mayor Mariupol, posted about the mass grave at Manhush on Telegram on Thursday.

"As a result of a long search and identification of places of mass burial of dead Mariupol residents, we established the fact of arrangement and mass burial of the dead Mariupol residents in the village of Manhush," he wrote.

Andriushchenko -- who is not in Mariupol but has served as a clearinghouse for information from inside the besieged city -- said Russian forces had dug several mass graves, each measuring about 30 meters (around 100 feet), in Manhush, a town around 12 miles (20 kilometers) to the west of Mariupol. 

On Tuesday Boichenko repeated that some 20,000 residents of Mariupol had died since the beginning of the invasion.

"The situation in Mariupol remains extremely difficult," he said. "Enemy artillery shells our fortress Azovstal," the steel plant where Ukrainian troops and civilians are holed up.

"There are women and children inside. Ceasefire is needed to begin the evacuation. Unfortunately, there is no ceasefire," Boichenko said. "People are running out of food, there is almost no drinking water. This is a humanitarian catastrophe."

6:08 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

UN expects 8.3 million refugees to flee Ukraine

 From CNN's Benjamin Brown in London

Refugees fleeing conflict make their way to the Krakovets border crossing with Poland on March 9, in Krakovets, Ukraine.
Refugees fleeing conflict make their way to the Krakovets border crossing with Poland on March 9, in Krakovets, Ukraine. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A projected 8.3 million refugees are expected to flee Ukraine, according to the latest assessment by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Around 5.2 million refugees had left Ukraine as of Monday, the latest UNHCR data shows.

The UNHCR and partner organizations are seeking $1.85 billion to support Ukrainian refugees in neighboring countries, UNHCR spokesperson Shabia Mantoo said Tuesday.

Speaking in Geneva at the launch of an updated regional refugee response plan to support Ukrainian refugees, Mantoo said the plan "aims to ensure timely and life-saving humanitarian assistance to refugees fleeing Ukraine and third-country nationals, of whom a sizeable number would need international protection."

The plan will also focus on "solutions through the promotion of social and economic opportunities," Mantoo added.

In addition to those fleeing the country, more than 7.7 million people are internally displaced in Ukraine, according to the latest International Organization for Migration report, bringing the total number of those forced to flee their homes to 12.9 million.

There were also almost 13 million people estimated to be stranded in affected areas or unable to leave due to security risks, Mantoo said.

7:11 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Russia's invasion and atrocities in Ukraine are "indefensible," says US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin 

From CNN's Radina Gigova and Ben Morse

U.S. Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin, delivers a speech as he hosts the meeting of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at Ramstein Air Base in Ramstein, Germany, on April 26.
U.S. Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin, delivers a speech as he hosts the meeting of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at Ramstein Air Base in Ramstein, Germany, on April 26. (Michael Probst/AP)

US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said Tuesday that Russia's invasion and atrocities in Ukraine are "indefensible" as Russia has bombed hospitals and left children "traumatized."

"Russia's invasion is indefensible and so are Russian atrocities," Austin said, speaking from Ramstein US Air Base in Germany, where the US is hosting Ukraine-focused defense talks.

"We all start today from a position of moral clarity -- Russia is waging a war of choice to indulge the ambitions of one man.
"Ukraine is fighting a war of necessity to defend its democracy, its sovereignty and its citizens."

Austin explained that the "stakes" of the war reach "beyond Ukraine and even beyond Europe," before calling Russia's invasion "baseless, reckless and lawless."

"It is an affront to the rules-based international order, it is a challenge to free people everywhere. As we see this morning, nations of good will from around the world stand united in our resolve to support Ukraine in its fight against Russia’s imperial aggression. And that’s the way it should be."

Austin was speaking as part of his visit to Europe alongside US Secretary of State Antony Blinken.

Austin said his recent trip to Kyiv "reinforced" his "admiration" for the Ukrainian Armed Forces.

"Ukraine clearly believes that it can win. And so does everyone here," he said. "Ukraine needs our help to win today and they will still need our help when the war is over."

He added: "My Ukrainian friends, we know the burden that you all carry. And we know, and you should know, that all of us have your back. And that's why we are here today -- to strengthen the arsenal of Ukrainian democracy.

"We are all here because of Ukraine's courage, because of the innocent civilians that have been killed, and because of the suffering that your people still endure. Your country has been ravaged, your hospitals have been bombed, your citizens have been executed, your children have been traumatized." 

Some background: Austin and Blinken traveled to Kyiv over the weekend, where they met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to pledge US support in the war and announce that US diplomats would be returning to Ukraine.

On Monday, speaking at a news conference at an undisclosed location in Poland near the Ukrainian border, the top US officials insisted that Russia was failing in its Ukraine incursion, with Austin explicitly saying that the US wants to see Russia's military capabilities weakened.

5:38 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Germany to supply Ukraine with anti-aircraft tanks

German Defence Minister Christine Lambrecht arrives for the meeting of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at Ramstein Air Base in Ramstein, Germany, on April 26.
German Defence Minister Christine Lambrecht arrives for the meeting of the Ukraine Security Consultative Group at Ramstein Air Base in Ramstein, Germany, on April 26. (Michael Probst/AP)

Germany will deliver Gepard anti-aircraft tanks to Ukraine, the German Ministry of Defence announced on Tuesday.

The move was announced by German Defence Minister Christine Lambrecht at Ramstein US Airforce base, the ministry tweeted.

5:11 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Two missiles hit Ukrainian city of Zaporizhzhia, says military administration

From CNN's Tim Lister and Olga Voitovych

Two guided missiles hit the city of Zaporizhzhia in central Ukraine Tuesday, according to the Zaporizhzhia regional military administration.

The missiles hit one of the city's businesses, killing one person and injuring another, the administration said.

"Infrastructure facilities of the enterprise were damaged and destroyed," it said, adding that a third missile exploded in the air.

Earlier Tuesday, the Ukrainian state nuclear energy company, Enerhatom, claimed that two cruise missiles had flown over the nuclear power plant near the city of Zaporizhzhia.

"The flight of missiles at low altitudes directly above the ZNPP site, where 7 nuclear facilities with a huge amount of nuclear material are located, poses huge risks," said Petro Kotin, head of Enerhoatom. "After all, missiles can hit one or more nuclear facilities, and this threatens a nuclear and radiation catastrophe around the world."

The Zaporizhzhia plant was captured by the Russians on March 4 and is still under their control.

7:29 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

As Russian rockets rain down on Kharkiv, its paramedics are risking their lives to save others

From CNN's Clarissa Ward, Brent Swails and Scott McWhinnie

Vladimir Ventsel in Kharkiv.
Vladimir Ventsel in Kharkiv. (Scott McWhinnie/CNN)

Just before the start of Alexandra Rudkovskaya's shift on Saturday, her mom gave her a big, long hug. The kind mothers give their kids when they don't know when -- or even if -- they'll see them again.

Rudkovskaya, 24, works as a paramedic in Kharkiv -- a choice she says leaves her mother "worried to the point of hysteria."

"She says you need to leave this town, you need to go to some place safe. Why do you need to do this? I have only one child, stop doing this," Rudkovskaya told CNN.

Just hours after their hug goodbye, the stuff of her mother's nightmares came true when Rudkovskaya and her partner Vladimir Venzel put their lives on the line to reach an injured patient. CNN was there to witness their bravery.

Read the full story here:

4:44 a.m. ET, April 26, 2022

Explosions damage two radio towers in Moldova’s breakaway region Transnistria

From CNN's Teele Rebane and Hannah Ritchie 

Explosions in Transnistria, Moldova, on April 26.
Explosions in Transnistria, Moldova, on April 26. (Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Transnistrian Moldavian Republic)

Two radio towers in Moldova's unrecognized breakaway territory of Transnistria were damaged by explosions in the early hours of Tuesday morning, the Transnistrian Ministry of Internal Affairs said in a statement.

"In the early morning of April 26, two explosions occurred in the village of Mayak, Grigoriopol district: the first at 6:40 and the second at 7:05," the statement said.

"Law enforcers and Transnistrian emergency services were immediately dispatched to the scene…As of 9 am (local) the two most powerful [radio] antennas are known to be out of order,” it continued, adding that a bomb squad from the Ministry of Defense was undertaking an "investigation."

No radio tower staff or local residents were hurt, according to the ministry.

The site where the explosions occurred is known as the Transnistrian radio and television center, which was built in the 1960s and is one of 14 Soviet-era radio transmitting centers, the statement said.

No information was given about the cause of the explosions.

On Monday, a series of explosions were heard near the Ministry of State Security building in Transnistria’s capital Tiraspol, Russian state news agency RIA-Novosti reported.

Ukraine described those blasts as a planned provocation by the Russian security services. 

Some background: Transnistria is a breakaway republic in eastern Moldova that borders Ukraine. It has a population of nearly 500,000 and is internationally recognized as part of Moldova.

Russia has maintained a military presence in Transnistria since the early 1990s.

Last week, a top Russian general said Russia intended to establish "full control" over southern Ukraine during the second phase of its invasion, adding that doing so would give its forces access to Transnistria.