June 27, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Helen Regan, Andrew Raine, Sana Noor Haq, Hafsa Khalil, Aditi Sangal, Elise Hammond, Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, June 28, 2022
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6:33 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

Biden condemns Kremenchuk strike: "Russia's attack on civilians at a shopping mall is cruel"

From CNN's DJ Judd

In a tweet Monday, US President Joe Biden, who’s in Germany attending the G7 summit, condemned a Russian missile attack on a shopping mall in the Ukrainian city of Kremenchuk, writing, “Russia's attack on civilians at a shopping mall is cruel. We stand in solidarity with the Ukrainian people.” 

“As demonstrated at the G7 Summit, the U.S. along with our allies and partners will continue to hold Russia accountable for such atrocities and support Ukraine’s defense,” Biden added.

See the President's tweet:

4:38 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

Ukraine's Zelensky calls Kremenchuk strike "one of the most daring terrorist acts in European history"

From CNN's Kostan Nechyporenko and Vasco Cotovio

(Office of the Ukrainian Presidency)
(Office of the Ukrainian Presidency)

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has called a strike on a mall in the city of Kremenchuk “one of the most daring terrorist acts in European history.”

“Peaceful city, ordinary shopping center, women inside, children, ordinary civilians. About 1,000 people were there before the air raid was announced,” Zelensky said in a video address posted on his social media accounts on Monday. “Only wholly reckless terrorists, who have no place on earth, can strike missiles at such an object.”

The Ukrainian president went on to say the attack was deliberate.

“This is not a mistaken hit of missiles. This is a planned Russian strike at this shopping center,” Zelensky said in the video address. “The rescue operation continues, but we must be aware that the losses can be significant.”

The Ukrainian president said doctors had been dispatched from Kyiv to help treat the wounded and sent his condolences to the families of those who had died. He also called on people to follow warnings from the authorities. 

“I ask everyone, whenever you hear the siren of the air alarm — please go to the shelter. Necessarily. Don't ignore it,” he said. “Russia will stop at nothing.”

7:00 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

G7 leaders condemn "abominable" attack on Ukraine shopping mall 

From CNN’s Arnaud Siad

G7 leaders condemned the “abominable” attack on a Ukraine shopping mall in a joint statement on Monday.

“We, the Leaders of the G7, solemnly condemn the abominable attack on a shopping mall in Kremenchuk,” the statement reads.

“Indiscriminate attacks on innocent civilians constitute a war crime. Russian President Putin and those responsible will be held to account,” it continues.

“We will not rest until Russia ends its cruel and senseless war on Ukraine,” the statement said.

At least 13 people have died so far in the attack, and 58 people have been injured, according to Ukrainian officials.

In a video address posted earlier Monday, Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky said about 1,000 people may have been in the building when it was struck.

Read the full statement:

3:41 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

8 killed in Lysychansk as Russian forces try to storm the city, Ukrainian military official says

From CNN's Kostan Nechyporenko and Vasco Cotovio

At least eight people were killed and 42 were wounded when a Russian Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) rocket hit a crowd that was collecting water from a tanker, Serhii Hayday, the head of the Luhansk regional military administration, said on Monday. 

“Today in Lysychansk, when the civilian population was collecting water from a tanker, the Russians aimed at a crowd of people with MLRS 'Hurricane,'" Hayday said. “Eight Lysychansk residents died, 21 people were taken to hospital, and five of them remained in Lysychansk after receiving medical treatment. Sixteen citizens were evacuated to hospitals in other regions.”

CNN was unable to independently verify Hayday’s claims and the Russian government didn’t immediately comment on the incident. Russia has continuously denied targeting civilians despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

The alleged attack happens as Russian forces in the region concentrate their efforts on trying to take Lysychansk, the last remaining city in the Luhansk oblast still under Ukrainian control.

“In addition to storming the city from different sides, they are also destroying it with artillery, aircraft and constant shelling,” Hayday also said on Monday.

Hayday went on to explain that the humanitarian situation was dire, with “many wounded and dead already.”

“We have not been able to bring humanitarian kits for two days in a row because the road along which we were doing this was very heavily shelled,” he said. “We managed to bring the medicines that the doctors asked for [in advance], including anesthesia, to the hospitals because we understood that there would be more and more.”

The head of the Luhansk region military administration also said that Ukrainian forces are putting up fierce resistance in the area, but he added that they are outmanned and outgunned.

“The problem of the Ukrainian military is the same. The Russians have many times more artillery and many times more shells for them. There is an impression that there is an unlimited number of shells,” Hayday explained. “They have creeping, scorched earth tactics, they just destroy everything in their path. After several hours of shelling, assault attempts are being made, and they are beaten off. Again, several hours of shelling again attempt to storm — and so repeatedly.”

“The city is quite complicated, and now a large number of our defenders are just holding the defense, but many times more Russians have been thrown to storm Lysychansk,” he said.

 

3:12 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

EU Commission chief is confident in Ukraine's position despite Russia gaining ground in eastern Ukraine 

From CNN’s Emmet Lyons and Henry Hullah  

President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen arrives at the G7 leaders summit in Elmau, Germany, on Sunday, June 26.
President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen arrives at the G7 leaders summit in Elmau, Germany, on Sunday, June 26. (Liesa Johannssen-Koppitz/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said she would not “bet on Russia” despite Moscow's forces making progress in the east of Ukraine.

“Military experts tell us that the movements of Russia are much slower, less than expected. So Russia is running into more and more trouble,” she told CNN on Monday. “I would not at all bet on Russia. On the contrary ... Ukrainians know what they are fighting for. They are motivated. And the Russians have no clue what they are fighting for because they do not even see any sense in this war.”  

Speaking from the G7 Summit in Germany, von der Leyen said Ukraine’s allies remain unified. 

“We have unleashed six packages of heavy sanctions against Russia in record time. And indeed, it is not easy for our member states because they have to pay a certain price,” she told CNN. “There is unity in all the actions we have taken.”

“Putin never ever expected the determination, the resolve and the unity of the European Union,” von der Leyen added.  

2:44 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

11 dead and 58 wounded in Kremenchuk airstrike

From CNN's Kostan Nechyporenko

One person died after being taken to a hospital, bringing the death toll from the Krememchuk airstrike up to 11, according to Ukraine’s State Emergency Services.

In addition, 58 other people were injured.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has said up to 1,000 people were in the mall when it was hit by missiles, adding: "The number of victims is impossible to imagine."

2:03 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

"Serious disruption" to Russian gas supplies to EU "likely," bloc's energy chief says

From CNN’s Arnaud Siad in London 

A "serious disruption" to the European Union's gas supplies from Russia is “likely,” the bloc's energy chief said on Monday, urging countries to step up their preparedness.   

"Since the beginning of Russia's invasion of Ukraine we have known that a very serious disruption is possible, and now it seems likely. We have done much important work to be prepared for this. But now is the time to step it up," EU energy commissioner Kadri Simson said after a meeting of energy ministers from member states. 

“The situation is deteriorating. While the gas supply to the member states is currently guaranteed, the security of supply risks are greater than ever,” she added, noting that Russian gas exports to the EU are half of what they were a year ago. 

However, she said the security of supply risks were “not immediate” and the European gas system had “reacted well and so far has been able to absorb the cuts.” 

Simson said the European Commission will propose an EU plan to prepare for further gas shocks in July, as Russia has already cut or reduced supplies to 12 of the bloc's 27 member states. 

  

2:02 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

French energy companies call for "urgent restraint" from customers amid soaring energy prices

From CNN’s Camille Knight in Paris and Livvy Doherty in London

Customers refuel at a TotalEnergies SE gas station in Toulouse, France, on Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022. 
Customers refuel at a TotalEnergies SE gas station in Toulouse, France, on Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022.  ( Matthieu Rondel/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

The heads of EDF, Engie and TotalEnergies released a joint statement, appealing to their customers in France for “urgent restraint” on Monday, asking them to cut back on energy usage amid soaring prices.

"For months now, the European energy system has been under severe pressure, and the French energy system is no exception. Russian gas deliveries by pipeline have fallen sharply for certain countries, including France," said Catherine MacGregor, CEO of Engie, Jean-Bernard Lévy, chairman and CEO of EDF, and Patrick Pouyanné, chairman and CEO of TotalEnergies.

The rising prices resulting from this “threaten social and political cohesion and have too heavy an impact on the purchasing power of families," they added.

The three industry heads said they had taken action to tackle supply in the short term by “diversifying gas supplies, proactively filling storage facilities, installing a floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) in the port of Le Havre to accelerate LNG imports, and reactivating 'mothballed' facilities.”

However, they called on their customers to do their part and reduce their consumption of electricity, gas, oil and energy products, starting from the summer, saying “the best energy remains the energy we do not consume.”

“We must act on energy demand by reducing our consumption to give us more room for maneuver. We will need it to manage future consumption peaks and to cushion the technical hazards or geopolitical shocks that we may have to face,” the statement urged. 

1:51 p.m. ET, June 27, 2022

"There can be no return to pre-war relationship with Russia," German chancellor says

From CNN’s Inke Kappeler and Arnaud Siad 

German chancellor Olaf Scholz waits for other leaders to arrive at the G-7 leaders summit in Elmau, Germany, on Monday, June 27.
German chancellor Olaf Scholz waits for other leaders to arrive at the G-7 leaders summit in Elmau, Germany, on Monday, June 27. (Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

There can be no return to what the ties with Russia were before the war in Ukraine, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz said Monday, adding that the war waged by Moscow is a “deep, deep cut in international relations."

The war is “a matter of long-lasting changes that will shape international relations for a very, very long time," Scholz said during a news conference on the sidelines of the G7 summit in the Bavarian Alps in southern Germany. “In our relations with Russia there can be no going back to the time before the Russian invasion of Ukraine."

Despite uncertainty about how the world would change as a result of the war, the G7 members should “master this change” by “standing together and working together closely and in a spirit of trust," he added. “And that is what unites us: democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights."