September 2, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Tara Subramaniam, Aditi Sangal, Kara Fox and Adrienne Vogt, CNN

Updated 0143 GMT (0943 HKT) September 3, 2022
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2:17 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

Russia says it will suspend oil and petrol supplies if price caps imposed

From CNN's Alex Stambaugh

Russian oil producer Gazprom Neft's Moscow oil refinery on the southeastern outskirts of Moscow, Russia, on April 28.
Russian oil producer Gazprom Neft's Moscow oil refinery on the southeastern outskirts of Moscow, Russia, on April 28. (Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images)

Ahead of a G7 meeting to discuss setting a price cap on Russian oil, Russia's Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Novak said Moscow would no longer supply places that choose to implement such restrictions.

"If they impose restrictions on prices, we will simply not supply oil and petroleum products to such companies or states that impose restrictions as we will not work non-competitively," Novak said, according to Russian state news agency TASS.

G7 finance ministers are expected to meet Friday to discuss setting a price cap on Russian oil. 

"This is the most effective way, we believe, to hit hard at Putin's revenue and doing so will result in not only a drop in Putin's oil revenue, but also global energy prices as well," White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Wednesday, referring to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Novak called the proposals to impose restrictions "completely absurd" and said they could destroy the global oil market, TASS reported.

7:40 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

IAEA inspectors visit Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant despite shelling

From CNN's Uliana Pavlova, Olga Voitovych, Sarah Dean, Hannah Ritchie and Tara John

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Rafael Grossi speaks with members of the media after inspecting the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant on September 1.
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Rafael Grossi speaks with members of the media after inspecting the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant on September 1. (Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Most of the international team of nuclear experts visiting the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant on Thursday have left, after overcoming initial challenges in reaching the facility, including an hours-long delay and a drive through an active war zone.

The visit by the team of 14 experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including its chief Rafael Grossi, came at a crucial moment for the plant, which has endured constant shelling and raised fears of a nuclear accident.

Their trip was mired in risk as shelling had broken out on Thursday, with both Russian and Ukrainian officials confirming that the nearby city of Enerhodar had endured a morning of bombardment.

Mortar shelling by Russians forced one of the the plant's two working reactors to shut down on the same day, Ukraine's nuclear operator Energoatom said Thursday, while Ukrainian officials accused Russian forces of shelling the IAEA mission's pre-agreed route to the plant.

Grossi said that his team were determined to visit the plant, despite the bombardment. "Having come this far, I was not going to stop and with my courageous team we moved in. There were moments where fire was obvious," he told reporters after the visit.

"Heavy machine gun artillery, mortars two or three times were really pretty concerning, I would say, for all of us. We had splendid support from the United Nations Security team that is here with me as well. So I think we showed that the international community is there, could be there — and we are continuing this," he added.

Ongoing mission: The IAEA chief has now left the plant, however Grossi said the UN nuclear watchdog is "not going anywhere" and will have a "continued presence" there.

"We are not going anywhere. The IAEA is now there at the plant and it's not moving. It's going to stay there. We're going to have a continued presence there at the plant," he said.

Read more here.

12:41 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

Ukrainians say Russians are making no progress in Donetsk offensive 

From CNN's Tim Lister

Ukrainian servicemen fire at a position in the Donetsk region on August 26.
Ukrainian servicemen fire at a position in the Donetsk region on August 26. (Sofiia Gatilova/Reuters)

The Ukrainian military says the situation in the eastern Donetsk region is virtually unchanged, despite weeks of efforts by Russian forces and their allies in the Donbas militias to take new territory.

Russian President Vladimir Putin's declared objective is to take all of the regions of Donetsk and Luhansk, but Ukrainian forces still control more than one-third of Donetsk.

The Ukrainian military's General Staff said Thursday that once again the Russians had tried to attack in several directions, toward the city of Sloviansk and the towns of Bakhmut and Avdiivka.

In each instance, the General Staff said, Russian forces had been unsuccessful and had withdrawn.

It spoke of heavy attacks with tanks, artillery and mortars in the south where Ukrainian forces are trying to weaken Russian defenses.

According to the General Staff, the Russians had fired on 15 settlements in the region, mostly along the borders of Mykolaiv and Kherson regions, which have been an active front line for more than two months.

12:45 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

Ukrainian prosecutors identify Russian soldier suspected of shooting civilians from CNN report

From CNN's Sara Sidner, Lauren Kent, Victoria Butenko, Sandi Sidhu and Kostyantyn Gak

Surveillance camera footage obtained by CNN shows the suspect inside the dealership, which the group of Russian soldiers looted.
Surveillance camera footage obtained by CNN shows the suspect inside the dealership, which the group of Russian soldiers looted. (Obtained by CNN)

It was a chilling shooting: Russian soldiers caught on camera killing unarmed Ukrainian civilians as they walked away from an encounter on the outskirts of the capital Kyiv.

CNN first reported on the shooting in May, after obtaining exclusive surveillance video of what is being investigated as a war crime, a shooting targeting civilians.

Now, Ukrainian prosecutors say they have informed Russia that their pre-trial investigation has zeroed in one of the Russian perpetrators they believe is responsible.

The Bucha Prosecutors' Office in the Kyiv region says CNN's exclusive reporting was instrumental in helping identify the Russian soldier.

Prosecutors say the suspect is Nikolay Sergeevich Sokovikov, adding that Russia was informed of his charges of "violation of the laws and customs of war" and "intentional murder."

CNN has requested comment from Russia's defense ministry but has not had a response. CNN also asked the Russian MOD for response to our original report in May and never received a reply.

Read the full story here.

12:54 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

Lukoil chairman dies after falling from a Moscow hospital window

From CNN's Anna Chernova, Frederik Pleitgen, Chris Liakos and Julia Horowitz

The Central Clinical Hospital is seen Thursday September 1, in Moscow after Lukoil chairman Ravil Maganov fell out of a sixth-floor window and died as a result of his injuries.
The Central Clinical Hospital is seen Thursday September 1, in Moscow after Lukoil chairman Ravil Maganov fell out of a sixth-floor window and died as a result of his injuries. (Evgenii Bugubaev/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

The chairman of Russian oil and gas giant Lukoil has died after falling out of the window of a hospital in Moscow, according to Russian state media.

"The man fell out of the sixth-floor window and died as a result of his injuries," a source told TASS.

Lukoil confirmed the death of its chairman on Thursday in a statement published on its website.

Ravil Maganov "passed away following a severe illness," Lukoil said, making no mention of a fall. "Maganov immensely contributed to the development of not only the company, but of the entire Russian oil and gas sector."

Lukoil, Russia's second biggest oil and gas company, made headlines in March when it called "for the soonest termination of the armed conflict" in Ukraine.

"We express our sincere empathy for all victims, who are affected by this tragedy," the company's board of directors said in a statement to shareholders, staff and customers at the time. "We strongly support a lasting ceasefire and a settlement of problems through serious negotiations and diplomacy."

The firm produces more than 2% of the world's crude oil and employs over 100,000 people.

RIA Novosti quoted a law enforcement source Thursday as saying Maganov "most likely committed suicide."

"Investigating authorities are working on the spot to establish the causes of the incident," the source told RIA.

At least five prominent Russian businessmen have reportedly died by suicide since late January, according to previous CNN reporting.

8:23 p.m. ET, September 1, 2022

Ukrainian military says it is focusing attacks on bridges and other Russian positions near Kherson

From CNN's Julia Kesaieva

The Ukrainian military says it is keeping up the pressure on Russian forces in the southern Kherson region, with attacks on several targets Thursday, including bridges across the Dnipro river.

Its Operational Command South said: "Our missile and artillery units conducted fire missions on three control points, a radar station, two points of concentration of enemy manpower, weapons and equipment." 

"An attempt to establish a new pontoon crossing in the Dariivka area was also cut down by our fire," it said.

It added that fire against the Kakhovskyi Bridge left several additional holes, which meant it remained unusable to occupying forces.

Ukrainian forces have focused in the last two months on degrading Russian supply lines, ammunition depots and rear bases in the south.

1:32 a.m. ET, September 2, 2022

Putin snubs funeral of former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev

From CNN's Ivana Kottasová and Anna Chernova

Russia's President Vladimir Putin, right, talks with former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev at the start of a news conference at the Castle of Gottorf in Schleswig, northern Germany, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2004. 
Russia's President Vladimir Putin, right, talks with former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev at the start of a news conference at the Castle of Gottorf in Schleswig, northern Germany, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2004.  (Carsten Rehder/dpa/AP)

Vladimir Putin will not attend the funeral of Mikhail Gorbachev, the Kremlin said Thursday, in a snub of the former Soviet leader with whom the Russian President had a fraught relationship.

Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said "Putin's work schedule will not allow him to take part in the farewell ceremony for Gorbachev on September 3," adding that the Russian President visited the Central Clinical Hospital today to pay his respects to Gorbachev, laying flowers by the coffin.

A farewell ceremony for Gorbachev, which will be open to the public, is due to take place on Saturday, followed by the funeral later on the same day at Moscow's Novodevichy Cemetery.

Read the full story here.