November 14, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Rhea Mogul, Jack Guy, Aditi Sangal, Elise Hammond and Maureen Chowdhury, CNN

Updated 12:25 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022
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3:13 a.m. ET, November 14, 2022

Zelensky: Investigators found evidence of more than 400 war crimes in liberated Kherson

From CNN’s Mariya Knight

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses the nation in his nightly address on November 13.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky addresses the nation in his nightly address on November 13. (President of Ukraine)

Investigators have uncovered more than 400 cases of alleged Russian war crimes in the Kherson region since the exit of Moscow's forces from the area, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said Sunday.

“Investigators have already documented more than 400 Russian war crimes, the bodies of both civilians and military personnel are being found," Zelensky said in his nightly address.
“In the Kherson region, the Russian army left behind the same atrocities as in other regions of our country where it was able to enter.”

The president added that “detention of Russian soldiers and mercenaries who were left behind, and neutralization of saboteurs, are also ongoing.”

Zelensky warned “the situation in the Kherson region is still very dangerous.”

“First of all, there are mines. Unfortunately, one of our sappers was killed, and four others were injured while clearing mines,” he said.

Zelensky was echoing warnings voiced by a local Ukrainian official earlier Sunday, who told Kherson region residents to beware of encounters with Russian soldiers and to look out for mines or missile strikes from Moscow's military.

7:38 p.m. ET, November 13, 2022

Ukrainian military says it has liberated 179 settlements on the west bank of the Dnipro River

From CNN's Mariya Knight

The Ukrainian military says it has liberated 179 settlements on the west bank of the Dnipro River in the past week.

Meanwhile, military spokesman Vladyslav Nazarov says the Russians "continue defensive operations and the construction of fortifications on the left (east) bank" of the river.

According to Nazarov, Russians have “14 ships on combat duty and one missile carrier equipped with eight cruise missiles ready for use” stationed in the Black Sea. 

“In the Sea of ​​Azov, the enemy continues to control sea communications by keeping one ship on combat duty, and in the Mediterranean Sea, there are 10 enemy ships on combat duty, 5 of them carrying Kalibr cruise missiles, with a total salvo of 76 missiles,” the Navy of the Armed Forces of Ukraine said on Facebook Sunday. 
1:46 a.m. ET, November 14, 2022

After liberation, Kherson's residents now face severe shortages and threat from mines

From CNN's Mariya Knight, Amy Woodyatt and Nic Robertson

A resident hugs a Ukrainian serviceman after Russia's retreat from Kherson, in central Kherson, on Sunday.
A resident hugs a Ukrainian serviceman after Russia's retreat from Kherson, in central Kherson, on Sunday. (Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

Residents of the newly liberated city of Kherson are almost without water and face shortages of bread and medicines, officials warned, as efforts continued Sunday to remove mines and restore critical infrastructure following the withdrawal of Russian forces.

Crowds celebrated the liberation of Kherson on Saturday after Ukrainian forces swept into the city and Russian troops retreated to the east.

But life remains far from normal, with authorities warning residents to be wary of explosives littering the city, and Russian forces still nearby — just across the strategically important Dnipro River.

This is not the end of the struggle against the Russian occupation in the country, reports CNN's Nic Robertson, who witnessed emotional scenes Saturday in Kherson’s central square as residents hailed their liberation.

“Kherson is now a frontline city,” he said. “Last night and in the early hours of this morning you could hear outgoing fire towards the Russian forces.”

Read more here.

1:13 a.m. ET, November 14, 2022

Uncertainty surrounds whether Putin will virtually attend G20 — and how Western nations would react

From CNN's MJ Lee

Russian President Vladimir Putin during the award ceremony marking the 75th anniversary of Russia's Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) at the Kremlin in Moscow on Wednesday.
Russian President Vladimir Putin during the award ceremony marking the 75th anniversary of Russia's Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) at the Kremlin in Moscow on Wednesday. (Contributor/Getty Images)

US National security adviser Jake Sullivan on Sunday would not comment on the possibility of any European nations declining to participate in the G20 summit in order to send a message to Russia, saying that was not a move he had heard about directly from his European counterparts. 

“I will look forward to the opportunity to hear their thinking before I comment on it,” Sullivan told reporters on Air Force One en route to Indonesia. 

Sullivan added that Russian President Vladimir Putin virtually participating in the G20 was a “hypothetical” at this point, so he couldn’t comment on what, if any reaction, US President Joe Biden would have if that were to come to fruition. 

Sullivan said US officials did not have any substantive conversations with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov at the ASEAN summit just attended by Biden in Cambodia.

1:13 a.m. ET, November 14, 2022

Ukrainian women on the front line struggle to find uniforms that fit. One couple aims to fix that

From CNN's Christiane Amanpour, Maddie Araujo and Christian Streib

Roksolana, left, tries on her new boots while Kseniia Drahanyuk, the co-founder of the Zemlyachki NGO, helps her fill a suitcase with various items.
Roksolana, left, tries on her new boots while Kseniia Drahanyuk, the co-founder of the Zemlyachki NGO, helps her fill a suitcase with various items. (Christian Streib/CNN)

Andrii Kolesnyk and Kseniia Drahanyuk both beam with excitement as they crouch over a box.

They are about to unpack Ukraine’s first ever military uniform for pregnant women, which they recently commissioned after a pregnant sniper got in touch.

The young couple, both TV journalists before the war started, are now fully dedicated to their independent NGO, “Zemlyachki,” or “Compatriots,” which procures vital items for women in the armed forces.

The initiative started when Andrii’s sister was sent to the front on Feb. 24, the day Russia invaded Ukraine.

“She received men’s uniform, men’s underwear,” he says. “Everything that [was] designed for men.”

It soon became clear that servicewomen needed a lot more than uniforms. Everything from smaller boots to lighter plates for bulletproof vests to hygiene products is in demand.

So, the couple turned to private company donations, charity funds and crowdfunding to purchase goods independently of the military. Some customized gear such as women’s fatigues is produced under their own brand by a factory in Kharkiv in the country’s east — including the new pregnancy uniform.

Read more here.