November 16, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Tara Subramaniam, Sana Noor Haq, Ed Upright, Adrienne Vogt, Aditi Sangal and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 1:02 a.m. ET, November 17, 2022
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3:42 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

China calls for restraint following deadly Poland missile explosion

From CNN's Wayne Chang

Police block a road near the site where a missile strike killed two people on November 17, in the eastern Poland village of Przewodow, near the border with Ukraine.
Police block a road near the site where a missile strike killed two people on November 17, in the eastern Poland village of Przewodow, near the border with Ukraine. (Wojtek Radwansk/AFP/Getty Images)

China's Foreign Ministry called for calm on Wednesday after Poland said a “Russian-made missile” had landed in a village near its border with Ukraine, killing two people.

Asked about the incident in a regular briefing, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Mao Ning said all parties should “remain calm, exercise restraint and prevent the situation from escalating."

“China’s position on the Ukraine issue has been consistent and clear. It is imperative to engage in dialogues and negotiations to peacefully resolve the crisis,” Mao said.

Some context: Although China has consistently called for an end to hostilities in Ukraine, it has refused to condemn Russia's invasion. Instead, Beijing has called for the "legitimate security concerns of all parties" to be recognized, while blaming the US and NATO for the conflict.

Beijing and Moscow have become close partners in recent years as both face tensions with the West, with Xi and Russian President Vladimir Putin declaring the two countries had a "no-limits" partnership weeks before Russia's invasion began

So far, Beijing has not provided direct military or financial aid to Moscow that could spark sanctions from Washington. Meanwhile, Chinese state media has previously reported on leader Xi Jinping’s support for international peace talks as a mechanism for ending the war. 

3:35 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

US declines to comment on reports "Russian-made" missile that struck Poland was fired by Ukrainian forces

From CNN's Kevin Liptak, Pierre Bairin and Alex Stambaugh

US President Joe Biden speaks about the situation in Poland at the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 16.
US President Joe Biden speaks about the situation in Poland at the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 16. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

A spokesperson with the US National Security Council has declined to comment on reports the “Russian-made missile” that stuck eastern Poland killing two people was fired by Ukrainian forces, trying to intercept a Russian attack.

“We have no comment and will not be confirming this report. As the President said today, we support Poland’s ongoing investigation to figure out exactly what happened,” the spokesman said.

What did the report say? On Wednesday, the Associated Press reported that three US officials said preliminary assessments suggested the missile was fired by Ukrainian forces in an attempt to intercept an incoming Russian strike. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, according to the AP.

In a statement to CNN on Wednesday, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky did not explicitly deny the AP report. CNN has reached out to NATO about the AP report, but has not yet heard back.

The explosion: The missile landed outside the rural Polish village of Przewodow, about four miles (6.4 kilometers) west from the Ukrainian border on Tuesday afternoon, roughly the same time as Russia launched its biggest wave of missile attacks on Ukrainian cities in more than a month.

The exact circumstances surrounding the incident, which marks the first time a NATO country has been directly struck during the almost nine-month conflict, remain unclear, though the Polish Foreign Ministry has described it as “Russian-made.”

Both Russian and Ukrainian forces have used Russian-made munitions during the conflict, with Ukraine deploying Russian-made missiles as part of its air defense system. These older-generation weapons systems date back to the period when both Russia and Ukraine were part of the Soviet Union.

Read the full story here.

3:25 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

G20 ends with "most" members condemning Russia’s war in Ukraine

From CNN’s Sandi Sidhu and Ivan Watson in Bali, Indonesia

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov walks during the G20 Summit in Bali, Indonesia, on November 15.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov walks during the G20 Summit in Bali, Indonesia, on November 15. (Achmad Ibrahim/AP)

“Most” G20 members states have “strongly condemned” Russia’s war in Ukraine, according to the end of summit joint leaders’ declaration issued in Bali, Indonesia on Wednesday.

The document, which runs to more than 1,100 pages, is not signed by individual attending leaders and acknowledged a difference of opinion at the summit, where scrutiny had fallen on China and India as Western countries pushed for a strong denunciation of the war in the closing statement.

“Most members strongly condemned the war in Ukraine and stressed it is causing immense human suffering and exacerbating existing fragilities in the global economy - constraining growth, increasing inflation, disrupting supply chains, heightening energy and food insecurity, and elevating financial stability risks," the document reads.

China has repeatedly refused to call Russia’s attack on Ukraine an “invasion” or even a “war,” nor has it condemned Moscow for its military action.

"There were other views and different assessments of the situation and sanctions," the document said. "Recognizing that the G20 is not the forum to resolve security issues, we acknowledge that security issues can have significant consequences for the global economy."

G20 nations, including China, also stated their opposition to the prospect of nuclear weapons being used in conflict.

The G20 leader’s document stated: “The use or threat of use of nuclear weapons is inadmissible. The peaceful resolution of conflicts, efforts to address crises, as well as diplomacy and dialogue, are vital. Today’s era must not be of war.”

3:03 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

EU and Australia reiterate support for Ukraine at G20 summit

From CNN's Yong Xiong

Australia’s Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. left, meets with President of the European Council Michel Charles, right, and president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen during the 2022 G20 summit in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, on November 16.
Australia’s Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. left, meets with President of the European Council Michel Charles, right, and president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen during the 2022 G20 summit in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, on November 16. (Mick Tsikas/AAP Image/Reuters)

European Union leaders and Australia stand “resolutely with Ukraine” and remain “unwavering” in their support for the country amid its war with Russia, according to a joint statement issued Wednesday at the G20 summit in Bali. 

The joint statement from Australian, European Council and European Commission leaders came after a meeting between Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, European Council President Charles Michel and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

“The leaders condemned in the strongest possible terms Russia’s unprovoked, illegal and unjustified war of aggression against Ukraine,” the statement reads, adding that the Australian and EU leaders “reiterated their firm commitment to holding Russia, and all perpetrators and accomplices, to account.”

The statement also acknowledged the war in Ukraine has caused “disruption and volatility” of global energy and food markets, and noted the role Australia can play in contributing to the stability of global gas markets through its steady supply to the Indo-Pacific. 

2:35 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

Russia's isolation at G20 summit over Ukraine puts China and India under spotlight

From CNN's Nectar Gan in Bali, Indonesia and Rhea Mogul

Xi Jinping walks at the G20 Summit in Bali, Indonesia, on Wednesday.
Xi Jinping walks at the G20 Summit in Bali, Indonesia, on Wednesday. Willy Kurniawan/Pool/Reuters

Russia’s international isolation grew Wednesday, as world leaders sought to gain unanimous support in condemning its war in Ukraine that has killed thousands of people and roiled the global economy.

At the Group of 20 summit in Bali, Indonesia, scrutiny fell on China and India as Western countries pushed for a strong denunciation of the war in a closing statement that was due just hours after Poland said a “Russian-made missile” had landed in a village near its border with Ukraine, killing two people.

It remains unclear who fired that missile. Both Russian and Ukrainian forces have used Russian-made munitions during the conflict, with Ukraine deploying Russian-made missiles as part of their air defense system. But whatever the outcome of the investigation into the deadly strike, the incident underscored the dangers of miscalculation in a brutal war that has stretched on for nearly nine months, and which risks escalating further and dragging major powers into it.

Waking up to the news, US President Joe Biden and leaders from the G7 and NATO convened an emergency meeting in Bali to discuss the explosion. The incident now raises the stakes in an effort by the US and its allies to end the G20 summit with a joint communique denouncing Russia’s war.

The passing of the communique would require the buy-in from leaders that share close ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin and have until now seemed reluctant to outwardly criticize his invasion — most notably Chinese leader Xi Jinping, who declared a “no-limits” friendship between their countries weeks before the invasion, and India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

With the summit set to draw to a close on Wednesday afternoon, all eyes are on what the final declaration will look like, and which countries will sign it.

Read the full story here.

2:18 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

Turkish President says he "respects" Russia’s denials over Poland missile incident

From CNN’s Mayumi Maruyama and Josh Pennington

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he respects Russia's denial of involvement in a deadly explosion in Poland, but added that the incident should be investigated.

Two people were killed Tuesday when what Polish authorities said was a "Russian-made missile" landed near the village of Przewodow, about 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) west of the Ukrainian border.

Speaking Wednesday at a news conference at the G20 summit in Bali, Erdogan said he “has to respect the declaration made by Russia” that it was not responsible. 

“We take seriously Russia's statement that "[it] have nothing to do with this," he said.

“This morning when I met with the German chancellor Mr. [Olaf] Scholz, we have also agreed that further investigation is needed.”

The circumstances surrounding the incident, including who fired the missile and where it was fired from, remain unclear. Both Ukraine and Russia have used Russian-made munitions during the almost nine-month conflict.

Russian denials: Russia's Defense Ministry said reports of Russian missiles landing in Poland were a "deliberate provocation." The Russian mission at the United Nations on Wednesday reiterated that stance and claimed — without offering evidence or specifically naming any parties — that the incident was an attempt to bring NATO directly into the war in Ukraine.

Some background: Erdogan has played a delicate balancing act since the start of Russia's invasion. He has refused to sign up to Western sanctions against Russia and sought to play something of a peacemaker role between Kyiv and Moscow. The Turkish leader also helped broker a deal between Russia and Ukraine to allow the resumption of grain shipments from Ukraine's Black Sea ports.

2:11 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

President Biden has left the G20 summit in Bali

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

US President Joe Biden has left Bali on Air Force One after attending the G20 summit and holding a high-stakes first meeting with Chinese leader Xi Jinping on the Indonesian island.

Prior to his departure, Biden held an emergency meeting with G7 and NATO allies on the sidelines of the summit on Tuesday after Poland said a "Russian-made missile" landed on a village near the Ukraine border on Tuesday, killing two people.

Biden said earlier that preliminary information suggested it is unlikely the missile was fired from within Russia.

1:53 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

Moscow's UN envoy claims Poland blast an "attempt to provoke a direct military clash between NATO and Russia"

From CNN's Jonny Hallam and Josh Pennington

Police officers stand at a blockade near the explosion site in Przewodow on Wednesday.
Police officers stand at a blockade near the explosion site in Przewodow on Wednesday. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

The Russian mission at the United Nations on Wednesday reiterated Moscow's earlier denials of involvement in a deadly explosion in Poland and claimed — without offering evidence or specifically naming any parties — that the incident was an attempt to bring NATO directly into the war in Ukraine.

Two people were killed Tuesday when what Polish authorities said was a "Russian-made missile" landed near the village of Przewodow, about four miles (6.4 kilometers) west from the Ukrainian border, roughly the same time as Moscow's forces launched their biggest wave of missile attacks on Ukrainian cities in more than a month.

"The facts indicate that Russia had nothing to do with the missiles [sic] hitting Polish territory," Russia's first deputy permanent representative at the UN, Dmitry Polyansky, said on Telegram. "The incident in Poland is an attempt to provoke a direct military clash between NATO and Russia."

Polyansky said the incident would be the focus of attention at the UN Security Council meeting on Ukraine later on Wednesday.

Some context: The circumstances surrounding the incident, including who fired the missile and where it was fired from, remain unclear. Both Ukraine and Russia have used Russian-made munitions during the almost nine-month conflict.

Following an emergency meeting on the sidelines of the G20 summit, NATO and G7 leaders said they offered "full support" for Poland and would "remain in close touch" to determine the appropriate next steps. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg will chair an emergency meeting of alliance ambassadors Wednesday morning in Brussels to discuss the incident.

1:36 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022

Poland blast "would not have happened" without Russian missile attacks on Ukraine, Dutch PM says

From CNN's Mick Krever and Martin Goillandeau

The deadly explosion of a missile within Poland’s borders on Tuesday “would not have happened without Russia’s horrific missile attacks against Ukraine,” Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said in a tweet on Wednesday.

Rutte tweeted a photo of the G7 heads of state alongside NATO members present at the G20 summit in Bali after an emergency meeting held by the group to discuss the incident.

He wrote that the leaders were "united in our message that we first need to establish the facts and therefore support Poland's investigation."

“One thing is clear: this would not have happened without Russia’s horrific missile attacks against Ukraine. We continue to support Ukraine in its defence against the Russian aggression,” he added in a second tweet.

Some context: The circumstances surrounding the incident remain unclear — including who fired the missile and where it was fired from. Both Russian and Ukrainian forces have used Russian-made munitions during the conflict, with Ukraine deploying Russian-made missiles as part of their air defense system.