March 28, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Aditi Sangal, Travis Caldwell, Helen Regan, Amy Woodyatt, Maureen Chowdhury, Jason Kurtz and Kathryn Snowdon, CNN

Updated 0403 GMT (1203 HKT) March 29, 2022
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8:07 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Russia "not afraid" of censored Zelensky interview

From CNN's Lindsay Isaac

Ukrainian President Zelensky gives an interview to independent Russian media on March 27.
Ukrainian President Zelensky gives an interview to independent Russian media on March 27. (President of Ukraine)

Russia is "not afraid" of an interview Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky gave to independent Russian media, the Kremlin’s spokesperson Dmitry Peskov told CNN Monday.

Russia's media watchdog Roskomnadzor warned Russian news outlets on Sunday against broadcasting or distributing the interview between Zelensky and a group of independent Russian journalists.

"[We’re] not afraid," Peskov said when asked by CNN what Russia or Roskomnadzor were afraid of.

"We have laws in place, and it is very important not to publish information that would amount to a violation of these laws," Peskov added.

Media gag: Russia recently signed a censorship law making it a crime for what Russia considers to be dissemination of "fake" information, punishable by up to 15 years in jail. The Russian government continues to present its invasion of Ukraine as a special military operation.

8:18 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Ukraine invasion is "return to imperialism" says German chancellor

From CNN's Inke Kappeler in Berlin

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz takes part in the final press conference after the EU summit on March 25 in Brussels, Belgium.
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz takes part in the final press conference after the EU summit on March 25 in Brussels, Belgium. (Michael Kappeler/picture alliance/Getty Images)

German chancellor Olaf Scholz has said the invasion of Ukraine is "the return to imperialism."

"We all have to prepare for the fact that we have a neighbor that is currently using violence. And we must prevent this to become code of practice," Scholz said during the "Anne Will" talk show on public broadcast TV Sunday evening.

Germany was discussing the purchase of an anti-missile defense system, said Scholz.

Germany cautions Russia: Scholz issued a series of warnings to Moscow.

"Don't dare to attack us," he warned.

Though "Zelensky is right to demand help from everybody in the world," Scholz said, "we will not engage with military forces – even if you call them peacekeeping troops – and we will not establish a no-fly zone." Such measures would be the start of a "huge confrontation between NATO and Russia," he added.

"NATO will not be part of this war," he said.

NATO was preparing for dramatic measures in case Russia were to use use biological and chemical weapons, said Scholz.

"The use of biological and chemical weapons may not happen," he said, but issued a direct warning to Russia: "Don't dare to do it."

3:09 p.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Russia-Ukraine talks will continue in Turkey, Russian foreign minister says

From CNN Staff

Russia-Ukraine talks are set to resume in-person in Istanbul, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Monday during a news conference.

"These negotiations are ongoing. They will be resumed today-tomorrow in Istanbul in-person after a series of video conferences," Lavrov said.

"And we are interested that these negotiations would bring a result and that this result would achieve our fundamental goals," he said.

"The fact that it was decided to continue negotiations in person is important," Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov said Monday during a call with journalists.

Peskov said the talks between the two sides are likely to resume Tuesday.

7:26 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Heineken to pull out of Russia

From CNN's Chris Liakos

Bottles of Amstel Pilsner beer move along the production line at the Heineken NV brewery in Saint Petersburg, Russia, on November 18, 2015
Bottles of Amstel Pilsner beer move along the production line at the Heineken NV brewery in Saint Petersburg, Russia, on November 18, 2015 (Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Dutch brewer Heineken said Monday it will exit the Russian market amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

"Following the previously announced strategic review of our operations, we have concluded that HEINEKEN’s ownership of the business in Russia is no longer sustainable nor viable in the current environment. As a result, we have decided to leave Russia," the company said in a press release.

Heineken had already halted new investments and exports to Russia and had stopped the sale, production and advertising of its Heineken brand beer in the country.

"We are shocked and deeply saddened to watch the war in Ukraine continue to unfold and intensify," said Heineken.

"We aim for an orderly transfer of our business to a new owner in full compliance with international and local laws. To ensure the ongoing safety and wellbeing of our employees and to minimise the risk of nationalisation, we concluded that it is essential that we continue with the recently reduced operations during this transition period," it added.

The brewer said it will pay salaries to its 1,800 employees in Russia until the end of 2022 and "will do our utmost to safeguard their future employment."

Financial implications: Heineken expects to take a 400 million euros ($439 million) hit from the move.

"Upon completion of the transfer HEINEKEN will no longer have a presence in Russia," the company said.

7:18 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

It's 2 p.m. in Kyiv.  Here's what you need to know

Ukraine has slowed some of Russia's advances, but multiple cities are being hit with missiles, a presidential adviser said. Russian forces continued missile strikes across Ukraine Sunday evening, including the cities of Lutsk, Kharkiv, Zhytomyr and Rivne, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said, while shelling has been reported around the outskirts of Kyiv.

Meanwhile, Zelensky said he is ready to accept a neutral, non-nuclear status as part of a peace deal with Russia.

Here are the latest developments:

Russian forces attempting 'corridor' around Kyiv, officials say: Ukraine's deputy defense minister said Monday that Russian forces were attempting to establish a "corridor" around the Ukrainian capital to block supply routes, amid continued fighting around Kyiv's suburbs.

Russian strikes continue: Ukrainian presidential adviser Mikhail Podoliak said the cities of Lutsk, Kharkiv, Zhytomyr and Rivne were among the locations hit by Russian missiles on Sunday. "More and more missiles every day. Mariupol under the 'carpet' bombing," he said. "Russia no longer has a language, humanism, civilization. Only missiles, bombs and attempts to wipe Ukraine off the face of the earth." A loud explosion followed by sirens were also heard in Kyiv early Monday, according to CNN teams on the ground.

Most Russian gains in Mariupol area are in the south: Most of Russia’s military gains near the port city of Mariupol are in the southern areas, according to the UK’s latest intelligence update. Further to its report, the UK's Ministry of Defence said there was "no significant change to Russian Forces dispositions in occupied Ukraine."

Kremlin concerned by Biden's remarks: The Kremlin is concerned by US President Joe Biden’s comments about Russian President Vladimir Putin, spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Monday, adding that Biden's comments would continue to be monitored. Biden said on Saturday that Putin "cannot remain in power." Biden and White House officials later sought to walk back and clarify the President's comments, adding that he was not calling for regime change in Russia.

Peace talks will resume Tuesday: Russia-Ukraine negotiations are set to resume in-person in Istanbul, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Monday. Zelensky said in a video posted to social media that peace and the restoration of normal life are the "obvious" goals of Ukraine. "Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity are beyond doubt. Effective security guarantees for our state are mandatory," he said. Zelensky also told journalists Sunday that a neutral, non-nuclear status for Ukraine in the form of a "serious treaty" was acceptable as part of a deal with Russia, but any agreement would have to be put to a referendum.

Ukraine promises "immediate investigation" after video surfaces: An almost six-minute-long video shows what appear to be Ukrainian soldiers shooting men who are apparently Russian prisoners in the knees during an operation in the Kharkiv region. Asked about the video, a senior presidential advisor, Oleksiy Arestovych, said: "The government is taking this very seriously, and there will be an immediate investigation. We are a European army, and we do not mock our prisoners. If this turns out to be real, this is absolutely unacceptable behavior." CNN is not showing the video.

Putin eyeing "Korean scenario": Ukraine’s military intelligence head said Putin could be looking to carve Ukraine in two – like North and South Korea. Brig. Gen. Kyrylo Budanov said Russia’s operations around Kyiv had failed and it was now impossible for the Russian army to overthrow the Ukrainian government. Putin’s war was now focused on the south and the east of the country, he said. "[Russian forces] will try to impose a dividing line between the unoccupied and occupied regions of our country. In fact, it is an attempt to create North and South Korea in Ukraine," he said.

8:18 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Russian forces attempting "corridor" around Kyiv, says Ukrainian deputy defense minister

From CNN's Vasco Cotovio in Kyiv and Nathan Hodge in Lviv

Satellite imagery shows burning buildings and craters near Irpin and Horenka, outside of Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 25.
Satellite imagery shows burning buildings and craters near Irpin and Horenka, outside of Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 25. (Maxar Technologies/Getty Images)

Ukraine's deputy defense minister said Monday that Russian forces were attempting to establish a "corridor" around the Ukrainian capital to block supply routes, amid continued fighting around Kyiv's suburbs.

"The enemy is trying to make a corridor around Kyiv and block transport routes," said Hanna Maliar, Ukraine's Deputy Defense Minister, in televised remarks.

"The defense of Kyiv continues. Ground forces, Air Assault Forces, special operations forces, territorial defense are involved. Kyiv residents are also very active in the defense of Kyiv. It is very difficult for the enemy. But we must speak honestly: the enemy is not letting up attempts to seize Kyiv after all. Because taking Kyiv essentially means taking Ukraine. So that is their goal."

The Kyiv regional military administration said in a statement Monday that areas around the western suburbs of Bucha, Irpin, Hostomel and Makariv as well as the route from and to the city of Zhytomyr to the west and areas north of Vyshhorod remained very dangerous and prone to shelling by Russian forces.

"Over the past 24 hours, there have been more than 40 incidents of shelling by Russian troops of housing estates and social infrastructure," the statement said.

A CNN team visited Novi Petrivtsi, a town north of Vyshhorod on Sunday, and saw first-hand the damage done by Russian artillery. Several houses had been completely destroyed. Residents and local authorities reported near-daily explosions in the area.

6:29 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Kremlin says Biden's comments on Putin are a cause for concern

From CNN Staff

US President Joe Biden delivers a speech about the Russian war in Ukraine at the Royal Castle in Warsaw, Poland, on March 26.
US President Joe Biden delivers a speech about the Russian war in Ukraine at the Royal Castle in Warsaw, Poland, on March 26. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kremlin is concerned by US President Joe Biden’s comments about Russian President Vladimir Putin, spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Monday.

Biden said on Saturday during a visit to Poland that Putin should no longer remain in power.

White House officials later downplayed the remark, saying Biden wasn't calling for regime change.

But the Kremlin issued its own affronted response, saying Russia's ruler is "not to be decided by Mr. Biden."

"These statements are certainly causing concern," Peskov said Monday on a regular conference call with journalists when asked about Biden’s comments.

"We will continue to closely monitor the statements of the US president. We carefully note them and will continue to do so," Peskov added.

8:18 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

"This invasion is horrifying": What it's like on the ground in Lviv following Russian missile attacks

From CNN's John Berman and Paul LeBlanc

Firefighters battle a blaze at an industrial facility after a Russian military attack in the area on March 26, in Lviv, Ukraine.
Firefighters battle a blaze at an industrial facility after a Russian military attack in the area on March 26, in Lviv, Ukraine. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

At least five people were reportedly injured over the weekend after at least two missiles struck Lviv, a city in western Ukraine that had been previously spared the worst of Russia's brutal onslaught, local officials said.

One of the strikes hit a fuel storage facility, causing it to catch fire, and a later strike caused "significant damage" to the city's infrastructure facilities, according to the city's mayor, Andriy Sadovyi.

For a better sense of the situation on the ground, we posed a few questions to CNN's John Berman, who's been covering the invasion from Lviv. His responses, sent via email on Sunday, are below:

WHAT MATTERS: Can you describe how people in Lviv are behaving at this moment?
BERMAN: We went out to one of the main squares today, less than 24 hours after a series of Russian missile strikes, and it was packed. So many people out enjoying the beautiful weather and street music and food.
It was astounding. Their reasons for being there were twofold. Some people told us it was their way of showing Putin that they can't be intimidated. But the majority of people we spoke with were actually from different parts of the country, and, frankly, they have seen worse. So the missile strikes here did not scare them, at least not as much as the things they have lived through in Kharkiv or Sumy or Kyiv.

Read the full story here:

6:30 a.m. ET, March 28, 2022

Kyiv eases curfew as strikes continue

From CNN's Nathan Hodge in Lviv

A man walks across what would normally be a busy road during the curfew in Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 27.
A man walks across what would normally be a busy road during the curfew in Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 27. (Ty O'Neil/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)

Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko on Monday announced a slight easing of the curfew in the Ukrainian capital.

In a post on his Facebook account, Klitschko said: "Friends! Important information! Curfew is changing in Kyiv and the region.

"As of today, March 28, the curfew will begin an hour later and end an hour earlier. And will last from 21:00 (9:00 pm local) to 6:00 am."

Local authorities previously announced schooling in the capital would resume in an online format Monday. Klitschko also canceled a plan for an extended curfew over the weekend.

Some background: Ukraine’s military intelligence head said Russian President Vladimir Putin could be looking to carve Ukraine in two – like North and South Korea. Russia’s operations around Kyiv had failed and it was now impossible for the Russian army to overthrow the Ukrainian government, he said.

Strikes continue: A loud explosion followed by sirens were heard in Kyiv early Monday, according to CNN teams on the ground. Shelling intensified around the city on Monday morning, the teams said.