Venue Guide
The 2002 World Cup is being held in 20 stadiums in Japan and South Korea -- 10 in each country.

Click on the location names on the map to get more information about each venue, including photos and links to weather forecasts.
Sapporo, Japan
Name: Sapporo Dome
Capacity: 42,122
Completed: May 2001
CNN.com Weather


Sapporo is the cultural and economic center of Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan's main islands. The high-tech dome features a mobile natural turf pitch that can be installed in hours. The complex houses an artificial pitch and an adjoining outdoor pitch. The turf pitch slides into place from underneath the eastern grandstand.
Sapporo, Japan


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Miyagi, Japan
Name: Miyagi Stadium
Capacity: 49,133
Completed: March 2000
CNN.com Weather


The striking stadium, venue for two first-round matches and one in the round of 16, is shaped in an asymmetrical arc modeled on the helmet of a samurai warrior's helmet. It is in the Miyagi prefecture 300 km (190 miles) north of Tokyo, an area renowned for its natural beauty, including Matsushima, an ocean inlet dotted with 260 islands.
Miyagi, Japan


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Niigata, Japan
Name: Big Swan Stadium
Capacity: 42,300
Completed: March 2001
CNN.com Weather


Another Japanese venue for the 2001 Confederation Cup, Niigata's Big Swan is a two-tier stadium with a translucent Teflon film roof to protect spectators from the elements. On the west coast of Honshu island, Niigata is a major port helping link Japan to the rest of Asia. The stadium hosts two first-round matches and one in the round of 16.
Niigata, Japan


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Ibaraki, Japan
Name: Kashima Soccer Stadium
Capacity: 41,800
Completed: May 2001
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The stadium is about a one-hour drive northeast of Tokyo, in a thriving industrial area that is developing as a scientific center. The closest stadium to Narita International Airport, it is home to the Kashima Antlers, a leading J-League team, and features a statue of Brazilian Zico, who helped the Antlers become J-League champions.
Ibaraki, Japan


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Saitama, Japan
Name: Saitama Stadium
Capacity: 63,700
Completed: July 2001
CNN.com Weather


The stadium will host the June 26 semifinal as well as three Group 1 matches. The modern stadium was designed with the environment in mind -- using channeled rainwater to water the grass and incorporating solar panels allowing it to conserve energy during daytime. Just to the north of Tokyo, Saitama is known as "the colorful prefecture."
Saitama, Japan


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Yokohama, Japan
Name: International Stadium
Capacity: 70,564
Completed: October 1997
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Selected as venue for the World Cup final, the stadium is home of the J-League team Yokohama F Marinos and is also used for athletics meets and other sporting events. Once a quiet fishing village, Yokohama is now a major port with a population of 3.4 million. It was also venue for the final of the 2001 Confederations Cup.
Yokohama, Japan


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Shizuoka, Japan
Name: Stadium Ecopa
Capacity: 51,349
Completed: March 2001
CNN.com Weather


The circular stadium is in the coastal city of Shizuoka, which is dominated by the massive Mount Fuji, Japan's highest mountain. Stadium Ecopa will host three games -- two in the first round and one in the round of 16.
Shizuoka, Japan


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Osaka, Japan
Name: Nagai Stadium
Capacity: 50,000
Completed: May 1996
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Host of 2001's East Asian Games track and field competitions, the Nagai Stadium will host a quarterfinal and two first-round matches. The stadium is centerpiece of a major sporting complex. A major trade hub, Osaka is known as Japan's oldest city and first capital.
Osaka, Japan


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Kobe, Japan
Name: Kobe Wing Stadium
Capacity: 42,000
Completed: October 2001
CNN.com Weather


The modern stadium, to be host of two first-round matches and one in the round of 16, features a roof over the main and back stands. Kobe is a major port in the south of Honshu island. It has been extensively rebuilt since 1995, when a powerful earthquake killed more than 6,000 people and devastated the city.
Kobe, Japan


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Oita, Japan
Name: Oita Big Eye Stadium
Capacity: 43,000
Completed: March 2001
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Looking, as its name suggests, like a giant eye, the stadium can blink -- opening or closing a translucent Teflon film roof. The only venue on the southern Kyushu island, Oita is famous for its blend of modern and traditional architecture. The stadium will host two first-round matches and one in the round of 16.
Oita, Japan


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Seogwipo, South Korea
Name: Jeju World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 42,256
Completed: December 2001
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Jeju Island is Korea's main tourist center. The island has about 500,000 inhabitants but hosts more than 3.7 million tourists each year. It is famed as Korea's "honeymoon island." The stadium opened in December 2001. It is 4 km (2.5 miles) outside Seogwipo. It was built at a cost of 112.5 billion won.
Seogwipo, South Korea


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Busan, South Korea
Name: Busan Asian Stadium
Capacity: 53,926
Completed: July 2001
CNN.com Weather


Busan is South Korea's second city and its premier port. Located on the southeastern coast, Busan was opened to international shipping in 1876 and rapidly developed as the maritime gateway to Korea. The city is hosting the draw for the 2002 World Cup and will also host the 2002 Asian Games next September. The stadium was built at a cost of 226.9 billion won.
Busan, South Korea


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Ulsan, South Korea
Name: Ulsan Munsu Stadium
Capacity: 43,512
Completed: April 2001
CNN.com Weather


Ulsan is a port city on the southeastern coast and is the industrial center of South Korea. The Ulsan shipyard is the largest in the world and accounts for 15 percent of the world's large container ships. The stadium was opened on April 28, 2001, and was used during the Confederations Cup. It will host a quarterfinal during the World Cup and was built at a cost of 151.4 billion won.
Ulsan, South Korea


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Daegu, South Korea
Name: Daegu World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 65,867
Completed: May 2001
CNN.com Weather


Daegu is Korea's third largest city with a population of 2.5 million and is an industrial base for textiles and fashion. The stadium hosted 2001 Confederations Cup matches and was opened on May 20, 2001. It will be venue for the No. 3 vs. No. 4 playoff at the World Cup. It was built at a cost of 289.6 billion won.
Daegu, South Korea


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Jeonju, South Korea
Name: Jeonju World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 42,477
Completed: November 2001
CNN.com Weather


Jeonju is on the southwestern part of Korea, about 240 km (150 miles) outside Seoul. The stadium, which is designed to incorporate the linear look of a Korean zither and a traditional Jeonju fan, opened on November 8, 2001.
Jeonju, South Korea


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Daejeon, South Korea
Name: Daejeon World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 41,024
Completed: September 2001
CNN.com Weather


The city is South Korea's technology capital and was the venue for the 1993 World Expo. Daejeon is almost in the center of South Korea and is an important transport hub. The stadium was completed September 13, 2001.
Daejeon, South Korea


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Suwon, South Korea
Name: Suwon World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 43,138
Completed: May 2001
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Suwon is 44 km (27 miles) south of Seoul. The city hosted several matches during the 2001 Confederations Cup. The stadium was opened May 13, 2001.
Suwon, South Korea


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Inchon, South Korea
Name: Inchon Munhak Stadium
Capacity: 50,256
Completed: December 2001
CNN.com Weather


Inchon is South Korea's second largest port and fourth biggest city, home to 2.5 million. The stadium opened in December 2001. Inchon is said to be the birthplace of soccer in Korea, when a group of children imitated crewmen from a visiting British warship playing kick-about in 1882. The sailors left behind a couple of leather soccer balls when they departed.
Inchon, South Korea


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Seoul, South Korea
Name: Seoul World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 64,640
Completed: November 2001
CNN.com Weather


Seoul World Cup Stadium will host the opener of the World Cup, with defending champion France kicking off the tournament against a Group A rival. The stadium, 10 km (6 miles) south of the city center, will also host a semifinal and another preliminary-round match. Billed as Asia's biggest soccer-only stadium, it opened November 10, 2001.
Seoul, South Korea


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Gwangju, South Korea
Name: Gwanju World Cup Stadium
Capacity: 43,121
Completed: November 2001
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Gwanju is located 329 km (204 miles) southwest of Seoul and is home to the annual Kimchi festival, which celebrates the traditional Korean dish of fermented and picked vegetables. The stadium opened November 13, 2001 and was built at a cost of 158.8 billion won.
Gwangju, South Korea


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