Opinion

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18:  Donald Trump Jr. listens to a speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Donald Trump Jr. sells America's integrity cheap

By Jill Filipovic
Junior is giving a speech about Indo-Pacific relations--on the same trip to India where he is hawking Trump-branded apartments; It defies logic to suggest that he isn't speaking as a representative of his father's administration as he leveragies his political access to sell units, writes Jill Filipovic.
A woman cries during a candlelight vigil for the victims of the Wednesday shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

To stop mass shootings, fix culture of hate

By Sally Kohn, CNN Political Commentator
Sally Kohn says that if we want to prevent future mass shootings, we must address the pervasive hatred that exists within our communities and society at large.
Russian Twitter bots

Russia's trying to toss us an apple of discord. We mustn't bite.

By Tess Taylor
Special counsel Robert Mueller's indictments accusing 13 Russians of conspiracy to meddle with the election have now given us a clearer picture of Russian efforts against the United States. Their strategy was simple: infiltrate groups on both the left and the right to heighten rhetoric, and use bots to intensify our discord. As Jonathon Morgan, chief executive of New Knowledge, which studies online disinformation campaigns, said to the New York Times: "The bots focus on anything that is divisive for Americans. Almost systematically."
TOPSHOT - A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), backed by US special forces, looks out from a building at the frontline in Raqa on October 16, 2017 in the Islamic State (IS) group jihadist' crumbling stronghold.
US-backed fighters battled  hundreds of Islamic State group jihadists holed up in the last pockets of Syria's Raqa, as the former extremist stronghold stood on the verge of capture. / AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC        (Photo credit should read BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

The mom's story I could not forget

By Gayle Lemmon
Gayle Lemmon shares the story of Batoul, a mother who fled her home in Raqqa, Syria -- braving air strikes, snipers, and land mines -- while she was eight months pregnant, and unsure what the future would hold. Lemmon was haunted by the memory of meeting her and on her return trip to Syria, she tracked her down to find out what happened.

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    By Rebecca Cokley
    I was lying on the cold metal table in the operating room in the midst of giving birth to my second child, in what had been a totally normal and uneventful pregnancy, when the anesthesiologist assigned to my C-section suggested that my obstetrician might want to tie my tubes. He didn't ask me. He didn't even acknowledge that I was there, though I was in a ragged state of consciousness. He said, "While you're down there, we are going to go ahead and tie her tubes, right?"

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