Democrats race to reach budget deal

By Adrienne Vogt, Aditi Sangal, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner and Maureen Chowdhury, CNN

Updated 0005 GMT (0805 HKT) October 29, 2021
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7:48 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

Hoyer and Clyburn acknowledge they are disappointed over delayed infrastructure vote

From CNN's Morgan Rimmer

Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, after voting for the stopgap transportation funding, told reporters that infrastructure will come to the floor “when we have the votes.”

“We’re gonna deliver,” Hoyer added. 

Majority Whip Jim Clyburn echoed this, saying he’s “not worried about” getting infrastructure done by Dec. 3 when the new highway funding extension will expire. 

When asked if they would vote on infrastructure, Clyburn said it was “above my pay grade.” 

“Steny decides when it comes to the floor, Nancy decides what comes to the floor, so you have to talk to one of them,” he said. “I have no idea, I’ll be ready to do my job when it gets to the floor.”

7:29 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

House and Senate have recessed until Monday

From CNN's Kristin Wilson

Both the House and Senate have recessed until Monday.

The House will return at noon on Nov. 1; the Senate at 3 p.m. ET.

7:20 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

House passes another extension of surface transportation

From CNN's Kristin Wilson

The House has passed a second temporary extension of the Highway Trust Fund, ensuring that 3,700 federal employees will not be furloughed. It was set to expire on Oct. 31.

The new extension will extend to Dec. 3, the same day as the government funding extension is set to expire.

The vote was 358-59, with nine present.

Though House Democratic leadership had intended this morning to bring the bipartisan infrastructure plan to the floor for a vote today, the House will leave that legislation – as well as the broader Build Back Better social spending package – pending until they return next week.

 

7:49 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

Hoyer expects vote on infrastructure bill will happen before Dec. 3 deadline for transportation funding

From CNN's Morgan Rimmer

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Sipa USA)
(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Sipa USA)

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters “yes,” he is disappointed that they weren’t able to vote on the infrastructure package today. 

When asked if it would take until Dec. 3 for them to pass it, which is when highway funding would lapse after the stopgap that members are currently voting on, Hoyer said, “no, I don’t think” it will take that long. 

In term of when they will finally vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill, Hoyer said, “I hope soon.”

When Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer departed the Capitol Thursday evening, he refused to say if key moderate Democrat Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema had committed to voting for the compromise Build Back Better legislation or if it would help advance President Biden’s agenda if they were to publicly announce their support.

“We’re making progress getting the President’s agenda done. That’s it, that’s all I’m saying,” Schumer told reporters. 

 

7:01 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

Jayapal: Progressives "overwhelming" endorsed Biden’s spending plan, but want infrastructure bill as well

From CNN's Leinz Vales

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, head of the House Progressive Caucus, said her members “overwhelming” endorsed President Biden’s spending package framework, however, the infrastructure bill needs to move with the “Build Back Better” agenda.

 “Our members have been saying for months that these two bills need to be, need to go together and that we need to have the legislative text,” Jayapal told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

Jayapal indicated Thursday evening that House leaders don't have the votes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

 “We have consistently said that we need to have both of these (bills), because it wasn't until we really did what we did, that all of these priorities of the President, the President's agenda, are on the table because of progressives standing up and saying we're not going to leave anyone behind," Jayapal said.

6:27 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

House delays infrastructure vote, unclear when they will vote on bill

From CNN's Manu Raju and Annie Grayer

Amid resistance from progressives over moving ahead with the Senate-passed infrastructure bill, the House will vote tonight on a short-term extension of highway funding, delaying the infrastructure vote.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer's office sent a notice that said the vote on the transportation extension would be the last one of the week, meaning there will be no infrastructure vote this week.

The transportation bill vote is needed to avoid a lapse in funding for transportation projects starting Monday.

The short-term bill to extend transportation funding will go until Dec. 3. That's the same day that government funding runs out and when the Treasury Department warns the debt ceiling will be hit.

6:05 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

House expected to vote on extension of highway funding, effectively delaying infrastructure vote

From CNN's Manu Raju

Amid resistance from progressives over moving ahead with the Senate-passed infrastructure bill, the House is expected to vote tonight on a short-term extension of highway funding, effectively delaying the infrastructure vote, according to a source familiar with the matter.

The move is needed to avoid a lapse in funding for transportation projects starting Monday.

5:58 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

Jayapal says House leaders don't have the votes to pass infrastructure bill tonight

From CNN's Manu Raju and Ryan Nobles 

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, head of the House Progressive Caucus, indicated that House leaders don't have the votes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill tonight and insisted the caucus' position is still that they want the bill to move at the same time as the "Build Back Better" agenda.

"Members of our Caucus will not vote for the infrastructure bill without the Build Back Better Act. We will work immediately to finalize and pass both pieces of legislation through the House together," Jayapal wrote.

The statement also said progressives want all 50 Democratic senators, including moderates Sens. Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin, along with the entire Democratic House caucus to sign off on the plan, writing, "This cannot be accomplished without legislative text that can be fully assessed and agreed upon by all parties, including 218 Representatives and all 50 senators in the Democratic Caucus." 

Of course, neither Sinema nor Manchin have signed on to the spending bill yet, and have only issued tepid statements on President Biden's announcement this morning. 

5:50 p.m. ET, October 28, 2021

Members say Biden told them he’s "within inches" of getting a deal with Manchin and Sinema

From CNN's Manu Raju

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema arrives to a closed-door meeting Sen. Brian Schatz), Rep. Pramila Jayapal and Rep. Joe Neguse at the US Capitol on October 28.
Sen. Kyrsten Sinema arrives to a closed-door meeting Sen. Brian Schatz), Rep. Pramila Jayapal and Rep. Joe Neguse at the US Capitol on October 28. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Rep. Kweisi Mfume, a Democrat from Maryland, said President Biden told the caucus that they are “within inches” of a deal with moderate Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, though he didn’t mention them by name.

Per different source at the meeting, Biden said he wants a vote on both bills, and then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said right after she wants a vote today on infrastructure.

Biden didn’t specify timeframe. Half the caucus cheered and stood up, chanting “vote, vote” — the other half didn’t.

Biden then joked that when a kid grows up and has a choice to be President or Speaker, “It’s more powerful to be speaker,” he told the room

Also leaving the room, Rep. Kurt Schrader, a Blue Dog Democrat from Oregon, wouldn’t say if he supports the framework deal, noting that he hasn’t seen the details yet.