Steve Bannon's trial begins

By Tierney Sneed, Katelyn Polantz, Aditi Sangal, Mike Hayes, Maureen Chowdhury and Elise Hammond, CNN

Updated 9:12 a.m. ET, July 20, 2022
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1:50 p.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Steve Bannon's trial now has a jury. Here's what we know about them. 

From CNN's Katelyn Polantz

Steve Bannon's trial on contempt of Congress charges now has a jury. 

Fourteen jurors — 9 men and 5 women — will be sworn in shortly at the federal district courthouse in Washington, DC, now.

The jury includes a State Department employee, an art salesman, a NASA contractor, a doctor, an architect and a handful of DC government employees.

Some of the jurors have extensive previous experience serving on juries, according to their statements in court yesterday.

The jury has 14 people because two alternates are in the pool, and won't be disclosed publicly until deliberations.

1:24 p.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Proceedings moving to final phase of jury selection

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

The proceedings are now moving on to the final phase of jury selection, in which the potential pool of 22 will be whittled down to 12 jurors and two alternates.

The parties were able to agree to a plan that will allow them to move on from the evidence dispute that dominated the morning. 

1:07 p.m. ET, July 19, 2022

The trial proceedings have resumed 

Former President Trump aide Steve Bannon's trial proceedings have resumed following a lunchtime recess.

US District Judge Carl Nichols had called a recess until at least 1 p.m. ET, with the instruction that the parties figure out certain things about what they intend to present to the jury.

12:23 p.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Here's a look inside the courtroom where Steve Bannon is on trial

(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)
(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

Here's a look at artist Bill Hennessy's sketch from Tuesday's federal court proceedings during former Trump aide Steve Bannon's trial on charges of contempt of Congress.

There are no cameras allowed in the federal courtroom in Washington, DC, but the artist's sketch provides a glimpse of the events unfolding inside.

The sketch shows Bannon's defense attorney David Schoen and prosecutor Amanda Vaughn speaking before US District Judge Carl Nichols as Bannon sits behind them.

The judge called a recess until at least 1 p.m. ET, with the instruction that the parties figure out certain things about what they intend to present to the jury.

Here are zoomed in versions of the sketch:

(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)
(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)
(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)
(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)
(Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

11:48 a.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Judge asks Bannon's team to settle on his arguments for why he thought subpoena deadlines were flexible

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

Steve Bannon defense attorney David Schoen and prosecutor Amanda Vaughn argue before US District Judge Carl Nichols on Tuesday.
Steve Bannon defense attorney David Schoen and prosecutor Amanda Vaughn argue before US District Judge Carl Nichols on Tuesday. (Sketch by Bill Hennessy)

Prior to going on recess, Judge Carl Nichols appeared inclined to rule that the October 2021 communications between the committee and Steve Bannon could be admitted at trial, but only if the portions of the letters discussing privilege are redacted.

“Those portion of the letters that discuss privilege aren’t to me plainly relevant right now,” Nichols said, noting that Mr. Bannon has not signaled an intention to argue that the return dates were in flux because there were ongoing discussions about privilege.

"The government should redact from the letters that it intends to introduce to its witnesses today any discussion of privilege altogether,” Nichols said.

He went on to lay out the specific portions of the letters that would need to be redacted, with prosecutor Amanda Vaughn also weighing in. As the redactions were being discussed, Bannon's attorney, Evan Corcoran, interjected to say that he was concerned about "redactions on the fly." Bannon’s team suggested that they had not yet settled on what they would proffer about why Bannon thought the return dates of the subpoenas were flexible.

What happens next: Judge Nichols wants the Bannon team to tell him by 1 p.m. ET what Bannon would argue on that point and whether Bannon could argue that discussions about executive privilege were one of the reasons he believed that the subpoena deadlines were still in flux. If Bannon was to make that argument, Nichols said, the October letters would likely be admissible in their entirety.

11:05 a.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Judge opens door to "modest" delay in Bannon trial

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

Judge Carl Nichols said it was possible that there could be a "modest" delay in the trial, as the parties continue to hash out a disagreement about certain evidence.

“I’m not foreclosing the possibility of delaying the trial by a day just to make sure we get our ducks in a row," Nichols said Tuesday.

The judge called a recess until 1 p.m. ET, with the instruction that the parties figure out certain things about what they intend to present to the jury.

10:41 a.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Court is back in session

Proceedings in Steve Bannon's case have started after a short break.

The judge gaveled in at 10:35 a.m. ET.

10:32 a.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Proceedings are in recess

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

At around 10:17 a.m. ET, the proceedings went on a recess and Judge Carl Nichols said that when he returns, he will hand down his ruling on the admissibility of the Jan. 6 House committee letters to Steve Bannon.

10:37 a.m. ET, July 19, 2022

Bannon team again attempts to delay trial

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

Before the arguments wrapped up, Steve Bannon's team made another Hail Mary attempt at delaying the trial.

Bannon's attorney, Evan Corcoran, argued that because of "seismic shift" of the parties' understanding of what evidence is allowed in the trial, the trial should be postponed for one month.