Joe Biden elected president

By Meg Wagner, Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani, Veronica Rocha and Amanda Wills, CNN

Updated 10:29 a.m. ET, November 8, 2020
52 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:32 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

President-elect Joe Biden will address the nation at 8 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden will address the nation at 8 p.m. ET Saturday in Wilmington Delaware, according to a press release from the Biden-Harris campaign.

1:16 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

This is the scene near the White House

Celebrations are taking place in the streets of Washington, DC, near the White House.

On a street near the White House known as "Black Lives Matter Plaza" — which has become a place of gathering and demonstrations — CNN's cameras captured crowds celebrating.

See it:

12:42 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Biden's victory speech is written, but he will spend time making adjustments

From CNN's Jeff Zeleny

In this Aug. 12, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and his running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., pass each other in Wilmington, Del.
In this Aug. 12, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and his running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., pass each other in Wilmington, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Joe Biden intends to spend much of the day with his family at his home in Wilmington, Delaware, where is also expected to field calls from longtime allies and world leaders.

His victory speech for tonight has been written, but he will be making adjustments until the very end.

But even though the pandemic dramatically changed the course of the presidential campaign, his themes will be the same as when he announced his bid: To restore the soul of the nation.

“We must put the anger and the demonization behind us,” Biden said last night – in a line expected to be renewed tonight.

 

12:20 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Celebrations erupt around the US following Joe Biden's victory

People celebrate Saturday, Nov. 7, in Philadelphia, after Democrat Joe Biden defeated President Donald Trump to become 46th president of the United States.
People celebrate Saturday, Nov. 7, in Philadelphia, after Democrat Joe Biden defeated President Donald Trump to become 46th president of the United States. Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Americans have flooded the streets to celebrate President-elect Joe Biden crossing the 270 electoral vote threshold.

In Philadelphia, a woman was spotted crying and saying, “I’m so happy. I don’t know what to do," according to CNN's Kate Bolduan.

Pennsylvania was the state to push Biden over 270 electoral votes.

Other celebrations were seen in New York City, Chicago and Atlanta.

Watch the celebratory scenes:

12:19 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Don't expect Trump to accept reality anytime soon and concede the race, sources say

From CNN's Jim Acosta

President Donald Trump speaks in the briefing room at the White House on November 5, in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump speaks in the briefing room at the White House on November 5, in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sources inside and outside the campaign say don’t expect President Trump to accept reality and concede the race anytime soon.

Trump is dug in, sources say, feeling embittered that he has lost the race. Advisers describe Trump as grasping any straw that he sees reported on Fox News.

He may never accept this reality, one adviser conceded.

Another indication of how alone Trump is at the moment: Vice President Mike Pence's advisers are not eager to get the vice president behind Trump as he drags this out. 

A source familiar with the situation said Pence wants to preserve his options for 2024. 

12:28 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

How do you feel about Biden’s victory? Write us or leave us a voicemail.

Joe Biden will become the 46th president of the United States, CNN projects, after a victory in the state where he was born put him over the 270 electoral votes needed to win.

With Pennsylvania's 20 electoral votes, Biden now has a total of 273 electoral votes.

Kamala Harris will be the United States’ next vice president.

She will be the first woman to hold the office. She will also be the nation’s first Black and South Asian vice president.

We want to know how you feel. Leave us a message in the text box below or leave us a voicemail with your thoughts.

12:51 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Kamala Harris' husband: "So proud of you"

From CNN's Arlette Saenz

From Doug Emhoff/Twitter
From Doug Emhoff/Twitter

Kamala Harris' husband Doug Emhoff just tweeted a photo of him and Harris.

An aide confirms this photo was taken today. Here's his message: 

12:13 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

No plans for Trump to invite Biden to White House, source says

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University on October 22, in Nashville, Tennessee.
President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participate in the final presidential debate at Belmont University on October 22, in Nashville, Tennessee. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

There are no plans for President Trump to invite president-elect Joe Biden to the White House in the coming days, according to a source familiar with the matter. Traditionally, there is an Oval Office meeting between incoming and outgoing presidents.

Trump has often referenced his Nov. 10, 2016, meeting with Obama, including what he was told about North Korea.

Trump, as made clear in his statement, is still contesting the election, so those traditional steps of a transition won't happen anytime soon.

Less clear is whether the other, more granular aspects of the transition will occur, particularly at agencies and among staff. One person familiar with the matter said there haven't been explicit instructions disseminated from the White House on how to proceed.

12:13 p.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Van Jones: "It's easier to be a parent this morning"

On-air Analysis from CNN's Van Jones / Written by CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

CNN
CNN

"It's easier to be a parent this morning," CNN's Van Jones said in an emotional reaction to Joe Biden winning the 2020 presidential race.

"It's easier to tell your kids character matters, it matters. Tell them the truth matters. Being a good person matters," Jones said.

"I just want my sons to look at this ... It's easy to do it the cheap way and get away with stuff, but it comes back around. It comes back around. And it's a good thing for this country. I'm sorry for the people who lost, for them it's not a good day. But for a whole lot of people it's a good day," he said.

Jones noted that, for many people in the country, especially minorities, life will be made easier.

"If you're Muslim in this country, you don't have to worry if the President doesn't want you here. If you're an immigrant, you don't have to worry if the President is going to be happier to have babies snatched away or send DREAMers sent back for no reason," he said.

Jones also highlighted how Biden winning the election is a "vindication" for a lot of people who have really suffered throughout President Trump's term.

"The 'I can't breathe,' that wasn't just George Floyd. That's a lot of people have felt they couldn't breathe. Every day you're waking up and getting tweets and you're going to the store and people who have been afraid to show their racism are getting nastier and nastier to you and you're worried about your kids and you're worried about your sister, and can she just go to Walmart and get back into her car without somebody saying something to her. "