October 3 Trump Covid-19 news

By Jessie Yeung, Brett McKeehan, Amy Woodyatt, Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Mahtani and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:01 a.m. ET, October 4, 2020
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10:42 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Vice President Mike Pence tests negative for Covid-19 this morning

From CNN's Betsy Klein

Vice President Mike Pence speaks at an event hosted by The Family Leader Foundation on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa.
Vice President Mike Pence speaks at an event hosted by The Family Leader Foundation on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/AP

Vice President Mike Pence and second lady Karen Pence tested negative for coronavirus Saturday morning, an administration official confirmed. 

Pence is still planning to travel to Salt Lake on Monday as planned, the official said.

The vice president’s office also said the President and Pence will continue to be in touch by phone today, like any other day. They declined to say whether they’ve been in touch already this morning.

10:06 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

President Trump's physician will hold a briefing this morning

A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.
A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Dr. Sean Conley, will be giving an update from Walter Reed medical center at 11 a.m. ET on the President's condition, the White House announced.

Trump took an experimental antibody cocktail for Covid-19 Friday after he was diagnosed with the virus. He is at the medical center, where he will spend "the next few days," the administration said.

9:59 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Donald Trump Jr. says he has tested negative for Covid-19

From CNN's DJ Judd

The President’s son, Donald Trump Jr., announced Saturday that he has tested negative for Covid-19.

He was at the presidential debate Tuesday with other family members.

Read Trump's tweet:

10:53 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Sen. Ron Johnson tests positive for Covid-19

From CNN's Manu Raju and Lauren Fox

Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., walks through the Senate subway after a vote on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.
Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., walks through the Senate subway after a vote on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images

Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, has tested positive for Covid-19, his spokesperson said. 

Johnson was not at the Amy Coney Barrett ceremony because he was quarantining from a prior exposure, during which he twice tested negative for the virus, according to the spokesperson.

His office said he was again exposed “shortly after” returning to Washington, DC, on Sept. 29 and was tested Friday afternoon.

“This test came back positive. Senator Johnson feels healthy and is not experiencing symptoms. He will remain isolated until given the all-clear by his doctor,” spokesperson Ben Voelkel said in a statement.

Some context: Johnson is the third Republican senator to test positive for Covid-19.

If the three senators – Thom Tillis, Johnson and Mike Lee – remain out this month, it would effectively prevent Barrett from being confirmed to the Supreme Court until they return, which could be a lame-duck session.

Confirming a Supreme Court justice in a lame-duck scenario is something GOP leaders are eager to avoid in case they lose next month.

Watch:

9:21 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

These news alerts tell the story of a historic day at the White House

Multiple CNN mobile push alerts helped to paint the picture of a historical Friday – from President Trump saying he will start to quarantine process, to confirming he and Melania had tested positive for coronavirus, to then leaving the White House to go to Walter Reed medical center.

The tweets also show a series of other events that unfolded, including Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife Jill testing negative for the virus, and former White House adviser Kellyanne Conway testing positive from an event she attended last week.

Take a look:

11:23 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Twitter bans posts wishing for Trump death. The Squad wonders where that policy was for them.

From CNN's Donie O'Sullivan

Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Ilhan Omar.
Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Ilhan Omar. Getty Images

The four progressive Democratic congresswomen known as “The Squad” expressed surprise on Friday night when Twitter posted about its policy against wishing harm or death to someone. 

Responding to media reports Friday about people wishing death to President Trump in light of his Covid-19 diagnosis, a verified account run by Twitter’s spokespeople tweeted, “tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against *anyone* are not allowed and will need to be removed.”

“Seriously though, this is messed up. The death threats towards us should have been taking more seriously by [Twitter],” Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan tweeted in response. 

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar and Ayanna Pressley also tweeted suggesting Twitter had not taken threats made against them seriously. 

Some context: The policy highlighted by Twitter’s press shop on Friday is not a new one.

Tweets that violate Twitter’s rules are often missed or not removed by the company, as CNN has reported in the past.  

Twitter said Friday that publicly wishing someone “death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease” does not result in an automatic permanent suspension from its platform. Users who repeatedly send tweets like this may eventually be permanently suspended, however. 

CNN has reached out to Twitter for comment about the congresswomen’s tweets.

9:00 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Kellyanne Conway, who has tested positive for Covid-19, was seen with Barr at SCOTUS event

From CNN's Evan Perez

US Attorney General William Barr speaks with Assistant to the President and Senior Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway at the ceremony where US President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the nominated to the US Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on September 26, 2020.
US Attorney General William Barr speaks with Assistant to the President and Senior Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway at the ceremony where US President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the nominated to the US Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on September 26, 2020. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

When asked why Attorney General Bill Barr is not quarantining after having attended last Saturday’s Supreme Court nomination announcement, the Justice Department would only repeat that he had tested negative on Friday for coronavirus and repeated what it had said yesterday.

This comes after Barr was seen right next to former presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway, who announced Friday night that she had tested positive for Covid-19. 

When asked about why he isn’t quarantining, Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec referred to the info she gave Friday and declined to comment.

The last time Barr was in a room with those who have tested positive for Covid-19 was at the reception for Amy Barrett, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, last Saturday. He sat in the front row, and was among those tested for Covid-19.

Barr traveled to Oklahoma for a tribal justice event this week and returned to Washington, DC.

Barr was tested Friday and his test was negative. 

The Justice Department declined to comment further.

8:27 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Covid-19 infections among Trump's team raise questions about coronavirus aboard Air Force One

From CNN's Pete Muntean

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One on September 25.
President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One on September 25. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The positive coronavirus test for a high-profile Air Force One passenger has raised the possibility that the virus can easily spread inside a confined aircraft cabin.

Experts fear the infection potentially puts at risk hundreds of people who travel on, operate and maintain "the flying White House" — threatening not only a highly recognizable icon of America, but also the smooth operation of a key national security tool used to evacuate the President in a crisis.

Administration officials said Friday that presidential senior adviser Hope Hicks was showing coronavirus symptoms while she flew on the world's most famous jet earlier this week, raising the concern her infection could be linked to the infections of President Trump and first lady Melania Trump.

Air flow risk: Experts have cautioned that during the pandemic, the unique air flow dynamics in the confined cabin of a jetliner — even one as large as the Boeing 747-200, known in the military as a VC-25 — could put unmasked passengers at a risk of catching the deadly virus.

Administration officials said Friday that Hicks began displaying symptoms on the flight back from the President's Wednesday rally in Minnesota and was isolated in a separate cabin. She was seen deplaning Air Force One from a rear set of steps not typically used by the President.

Distancing easier, but isolation is difficult: "Social distancing is much easier on Air Force One than any commercial airliner," said professor Yan Chen of Purdue University, a researcher who studies the airborne spread of coronavirus inside an airliner. Chen said most passengers do not sit in cramped rows on board the multi-room, highly modified jet, "but complete isolation is very difficult."

Chen said the air onboard large jets, including commercial airliners and Air Force One, is typically filtered through High Efficiency Particulate Air, or HEPA, filters, which are designed to catch most particles. The result is the air, even on large planes, is completely replaced every few minutes.

Air Force One also carries a special onboard oxygen system, although its capabilities aren't clear.

Commercial airlines insist air filters make flying in a plane safer than sitting in a shared room in a building. But it does not eliminate the risk of contracting the virus when a contagious passenger is onboard.

"If you have a patient inside of an airplane, then the droplets breathed out by this patient could be transported in the airplane," Chen said.

Read the full story here.

8:01 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Here's the latest on the White House outbreak

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

With President Donald Trump hospitalized for Covid-19, more cases are beginning to emerge in the White House and in his close circles.

Here's what you need to know:

Who has been infected: Trump, first lady Melania Trump, top aide Hope Hicks, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, and Republican Sens. Thom Tillis and Mike Lee have all tested positive.

The timeline: Hicks first felt symptoms on Wednesday night, and tested positive by Thursday morning. Trump was tested Thursday evening, and announced his results early Friday morning. Tillis, Lee, Stepien and Conway all announced their results on Friday. By Friday afternoon, Trump was hospitalized at Walter Reed.

Trump's treatment: According to Trump's physician, the President has received the Regeneron antibody cocktail, an experimental drug that has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. He has also received the antiviral drug remdesivir, which has emergency use authorization from the FDA, and has been shown to shorten recovery time for some coronavirus patients.

Trump is also taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin.

Fever and fatigue: It was reported Friday that President Trump had a fever, according to a person familiar to the matter. The person said the fever remains consistent with the White House's earlier description of "mild symptoms." This is in addition to new information released by the White House doctor, which described Trump as "fatigued."

In the President's own words: "I want to thank everybody for the tremendous support," Trump said in a video posted to his official Twitter account. "I think I'm doing very well but we're going to make sure things work out."

An outpouring of well wishes: China's President Xi Jinping on Saturday joined the dozens of world leaders and figures wishing President Trump a speedy recovery.

Questions arising: As the White House scrambles to respond to the cluster, experts and doctors are also raising questions about the timeline of Trump's infection, and how we got here in the first place.

If he was being tested every day, how did nobody realize Trump had been exposed sooner? If officials knew of Hicks' diagnosis by Thursday morning, why wasn't Trump tested until that night? And what exactly is Trump's condition, given that the White House has released mixed messages -- saying at first that he was energetic and staying at the White House, then saying later that day he was fatigued and going to the hospital?

"These are critical questions that must be answered -- that should've been answered already," said CNN's Don Lemon on Friday night.