October 3 Trump Covid-19 news

By Jessie Yeung, Brett McKeehan, Amy Woodyatt, Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Mahtani and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:01 a.m. ET, October 4, 2020
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11:23 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Twitter bans posts wishing for Trump death. The Squad wonders where that policy was for them.

From CNN's Donie O'Sullivan

Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Ilhan Omar.
Democratic Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Ilhan Omar. Getty Images

The four progressive Democratic congresswomen known as “The Squad” expressed surprise on Friday night when Twitter posted about its policy against wishing harm or death to someone. 

Responding to media reports Friday about people wishing death to President Trump in light of his Covid-19 diagnosis, a verified account run by Twitter’s spokespeople tweeted, “tweets that wish or hope for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against *anyone* are not allowed and will need to be removed.”

“Seriously though, this is messed up. The death threats towards us should have been taking more seriously by [Twitter],” Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan tweeted in response. 

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar and Ayanna Pressley also tweeted suggesting Twitter had not taken threats made against them seriously. 

Some context: The policy highlighted by Twitter’s press shop on Friday is not a new one.

Tweets that violate Twitter’s rules are often missed or not removed by the company, as CNN has reported in the past.  

Twitter said Friday that publicly wishing someone “death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease” does not result in an automatic permanent suspension from its platform. Users who repeatedly send tweets like this may eventually be permanently suspended, however. 

CNN has reached out to Twitter for comment about the congresswomen’s tweets.

9:00 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Kellyanne Conway, who has tested positive for Covid-19, was seen with Barr at SCOTUS event

From CNN's Evan Perez

US Attorney General William Barr speaks with Assistant to the President and Senior Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway at the ceremony where US President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the nominated to the US Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on September 26, 2020.
US Attorney General William Barr speaks with Assistant to the President and Senior Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway at the ceremony where US President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the nominated to the US Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on September 26, 2020. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

When asked why Attorney General Bill Barr is not quarantining after having attended last Saturday’s Supreme Court nomination announcement, the Justice Department would only repeat that he had tested negative on Friday for coronavirus and repeated what it had said yesterday.

This comes after Barr was seen right next to former presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway, who announced Friday night that she had tested positive for Covid-19. 

When asked about why he isn’t quarantining, Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec referred to the info she gave Friday and declined to comment.

The last time Barr was in a room with those who have tested positive for Covid-19 was at the reception for Amy Barrett, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, last Saturday. He sat in the front row, and was among those tested for Covid-19.

Barr traveled to Oklahoma for a tribal justice event this week and returned to Washington, DC.

Barr was tested Friday and his test was negative. 

The Justice Department declined to comment further.

8:27 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Covid-19 infections among Trump's team raise questions about coronavirus aboard Air Force One

From CNN's Pete Muntean

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One on September 25.
President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One on September 25. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The positive coronavirus test for a high-profile Air Force One passenger has raised the possibility that the virus can easily spread inside a confined aircraft cabin.

Experts fear the infection potentially puts at risk hundreds of people who travel on, operate and maintain "the flying White House" — threatening not only a highly recognizable icon of America, but also the smooth operation of a key national security tool used to evacuate the President in a crisis.

Administration officials said Friday that presidential senior adviser Hope Hicks was showing coronavirus symptoms while she flew on the world's most famous jet earlier this week, raising the concern her infection could be linked to the infections of President Trump and first lady Melania Trump.

Air flow risk: Experts have cautioned that during the pandemic, the unique air flow dynamics in the confined cabin of a jetliner — even one as large as the Boeing 747-200, known in the military as a VC-25 — could put unmasked passengers at a risk of catching the deadly virus.

Administration officials said Friday that Hicks began displaying symptoms on the flight back from the President's Wednesday rally in Minnesota and was isolated in a separate cabin. She was seen deplaning Air Force One from a rear set of steps not typically used by the President.

Distancing easier, but isolation is difficult: "Social distancing is much easier on Air Force One than any commercial airliner," said professor Yan Chen of Purdue University, a researcher who studies the airborne spread of coronavirus inside an airliner. Chen said most passengers do not sit in cramped rows on board the multi-room, highly modified jet, "but complete isolation is very difficult."

Chen said the air onboard large jets, including commercial airliners and Air Force One, is typically filtered through High Efficiency Particulate Air, or HEPA, filters, which are designed to catch most particles. The result is the air, even on large planes, is completely replaced every few minutes.

Air Force One also carries a special onboard oxygen system, although its capabilities aren't clear.

Commercial airlines insist air filters make flying in a plane safer than sitting in a shared room in a building. But it does not eliminate the risk of contracting the virus when a contagious passenger is onboard.

"If you have a patient inside of an airplane, then the droplets breathed out by this patient could be transported in the airplane," Chen said.

Read the full story here.

8:01 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Here's the latest on the White House outbreak

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

With President Donald Trump hospitalized for Covid-19, more cases are beginning to emerge in the White House and in his close circles.

Here's what you need to know:

Who has been infected: Trump, first lady Melania Trump, top aide Hope Hicks, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, and Republican Sens. Thom Tillis and Mike Lee have all tested positive.

The timeline: Hicks first felt symptoms on Wednesday night, and tested positive by Thursday morning. Trump was tested Thursday evening, and announced his results early Friday morning. Tillis, Lee, Stepien and Conway all announced their results on Friday. By Friday afternoon, Trump was hospitalized at Walter Reed.

Trump's treatment: According to Trump's physician, the President has received the Regeneron antibody cocktail, an experimental drug that has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. He has also received the antiviral drug remdesivir, which has emergency use authorization from the FDA, and has been shown to shorten recovery time for some coronavirus patients.

Trump is also taking zinc, vitamin D, famotidine, melatonin and a daily aspirin.

Fever and fatigue: It was reported Friday that President Trump had a fever, according to a person familiar to the matter. The person said the fever remains consistent with the White House's earlier description of "mild symptoms." This is in addition to new information released by the White House doctor, which described Trump as "fatigued."

In the President's own words: "I want to thank everybody for the tremendous support," Trump said in a video posted to his official Twitter account. "I think I'm doing very well but we're going to make sure things work out."

An outpouring of well wishes: China's President Xi Jinping on Saturday joined the dozens of world leaders and figures wishing President Trump a speedy recovery.

Questions arising: As the White House scrambles to respond to the cluster, experts and doctors are also raising questions about the timeline of Trump's infection, and how we got here in the first place.

If he was being tested every day, how did nobody realize Trump had been exposed sooner? If officials knew of Hicks' diagnosis by Thursday morning, why wasn't Trump tested until that night? And what exactly is Trump's condition, given that the White House has released mixed messages -- saying at first that he was energetic and staying at the White House, then saying later that day he was fatigued and going to the hospital?

"These are critical questions that must be answered -- that should've been answered already," said CNN's Don Lemon on Friday night.

7:41 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

China's President wishes Trump a "speedy recovery"

Chinese President Xi Jinping (C) arrives with Premier Li Keqiang (L) for a reception at the Great Hall of the People on the eve of China's National Day, on September 30.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (C) arrives with Premier Li Keqiang (L) for a reception at the Great Hall of the People on the eve of China's National Day, on September 30. Greg Baker/Getty Images

China's President Xi Jinping sent a message to US President Donald Trump on Saturday, wishing him a speedy recovery from the coronavirus.

"Xi said that learning President Trump and Melania have tested positive for Covid-19, he and his wife, Peng Liyuan, extend sympathy to them and wish them a speedy recovery," the Chinese Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

Xi joins leaders from around the world, including Russian President Vladimir Putin, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro in wishing the President well in his recovery.

7:45 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Before Trump, another US president downplayed a pandemic and was infected

From CNN's Faith Karimi

Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A century ago, a new respiratory virus gripped the country at the height of World War I. It started among American troops and exploded into a flu pandemic that killed 675,000 people in the US.

Like the coronavirus, the fast-spreading 1918 flu disrupted life in unprecedented ways. It overwhelmed health care systems, cleared public spaces, and shuttered workplaces and social events.

Like President Donald Trump, President Woodrow Wilson's administration downplayed the pandemic. And like Trump, who announced early Friday that he has coronavirus, Wilson also got infected. So did some of their closest aides and staff members.

"Wilson never made a public statement about the pandemic. Never," said John M. Barry, author of "The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History."
"So to keep morale up during the war, the government lied," Barry added, in an interview with CNN. "National public health leaders said things like, 'This is ordinary influenza by another name.' They tried to minimize it. As a result, more people died than would have otherwise."

Read the full story:

6:41 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Presidents in the hospital: A brief history

From CNN's Caroline Kelly

President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 2, after testing positive for COVID-19.
President Donald Trump arrives at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 2, after testing positive for COVID-19. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

President Donald Trump followed in the steps of several of his predecessors when he was admitted to the hospital on Friday, a day after his positive coronavirus test.

Trump arrived Friday afternoon at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he will be "working from the presidential offices ... for the next few days," press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said.

It remains extremely rare for a president to stay overnight at a hospital, given the extensive medical facilities available at the White House. But Trump isn't the first president to do so, for a variety of reasons.

A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland.
A view of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2, 2020, in Bethesda, Maryland. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Here are other presidents who have taken hospital stays during their tenures:

Grover Cleveland: In 1893, the country was in an economic recession -- and President Grover Cleveland needed mouth surgery. Doctors took a sample of a tumor without revealing Cleveland's identity, and advised he have it removed. But some worried that news of Cleveland's surgery would worsen the reeling economy, and staying in a regular hospital without drawing public attention seemed impossible.

So on a friend's yacht, under the guise of a fishing trip, a team of doctors sworn to secrecy performed the surgery, which ultimately included removing bone from Cleveland's left jaw. The President received a convincing prosthetic, and reporters were told that he was recovering from a cold and a toothache. Despite a leak to the press about the surgery, the public reportedly accepted the White House's account that the report was false, and Cleveland served out the rest of his term.

William McKinley: In 1901, President William McKinley was shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. He was taken to the hospital on exposition grounds where doctors didn't arrive for half an hour, according to notes from the surgery.

Despite the two shots fired, McKinley reportedly felt "no particular pain" after receiving morphine for the pain, and later ether as an anesthetic. Despite seemingly improving after the surgery, McKinley's condition soon began to worsen and he ultimately died eight days after being shot.

Theodore Roosevelt: Three years out of office, Theodore Roosevelt -- running for a third term as the "Bull Moose Party" nominee after succeeding McKinley in office -- was meeting supporters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, before a speech when he was shot and wounded by New York saloon keeper John Schrank. Saved in part by his thick speech notes and eyeglasses case blocking the bullet, Roosevelt gave the speech, lasting nearly an hour, in a bloody shirt before agreeing to go to the hospital. He lived the rest of his life with the bullet still inside his body.

Dwight D. Eisenhower: President Dwight Eisenhower experienced a heart attack in September 1955 while in Denver, suffering chest pains and being misdiagnosed with a gastrointestinal problem before being taken to the hospital in a Secret Service car. The White House initially downplayed the severity of the heart attack, and cardiac experts were brought to Denver as the President spent seven weeks in the hospital.

Eisenhower later needed surgery for Crohn's disease in 1956 and suffered a stroke in 1957. But some scholars have argued that while the 1955 heart attack drew questions about whether he was fit to serve or run for reelection in 1956, the event ultimately factored into motivating him to run for another term.

Ronald Reagan: In 1981, President Ronald Reagan was struck by a ricocheting bullet outside the Hilton Hotel when John Hinckley fired six shots in less than two seconds, hitting press secretary James Brady, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy and DC Police Officer Thomas Delahanty. Reagan was rushed to George Washington University Hospital in a split-second decision that possibly saved his life -- the bullet penetrated within an inch of the President's heart, filling one lung with blood.

After the attack, Reagan joked with his wife saying he "forgot to duck" and asked the attending doctors if they were Republicans.

6:37 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

The drug used to treat the President is being trialed on hundreds of patients in the UK

From CNN's Amy Woodyatt

President Donald Trump departs for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from the White House on October 2, in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump departs for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from the White House on October 2, in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The experimental coronavirus drug being used to treat President Trump has been trialed on hundreds of UK patients, and is "promising" and "potent," according to an Oxford University professor.

According to Trump's physician, the President has received the Regeneron antibody cocktail, an experimental drug that has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Professor Peter Horby told BBC Radio 4 Saturday that as of last weekend, the drug -- a cocktail of two antibodies --  is being used in “about three” hospitals in the north of England as part of Oxford University’s national Recovery trial, and will be rolled out to around 30 or 40 hospitals next week. 

Horby, professor of emerging diseases at Oxford University and co-chief investigator of the Recovery trial, said the class of drug “have been around for quite a while now” and are already used extensively to treat inflammatory conditions and cancers. 

He said the drugs were “pretty safe and well understood,” and that they had been given to around 400 or 500 mild or severe patients in different trials. “So far there’s been no worrying safety signals,” he said.

"It’s very promising actually, it’s very potent,” he said, adding that the drug has a strong effect against the virus in laboratory cell cultures and that studies in artificial infected animals showed a benefit.

“Of the drugs that are available, it’s one of the most promising,” he said.

Horby said a dose of the drug could give "prolonged protection -- if it works," adding that experts were awaiting results of the trials.

What else has the President been given? President Trump has also received the antiviral drug remdesivir, which has emergency use authorization from the FDA, and has been shown to shorten recovery time for some coronavirus patients.

5:24 a.m. ET, October 3, 2020

Former CDC director doubles down on importance of masks and social distancing, says Covid-19 "can happen to anyone"

From CNN's Christina Maxouris

Former CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies during a hearing on Covid-19 Response on May 6 on Capitol Hill, Washington.
Former CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden testifies during a hearing on Covid-19 Response on May 6 on Capitol Hill, Washington. Alex Wong/Getty Images

The former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Preventions said the diagnoses of the President and first lady serve as "a reminder that Covid-19 is an ongoing threat to our country and can happen to anyone."

The US needs a "comprehensive approach" to the Covid-19 pandemic, following a week of several states reporting alarming trends, Dr. Tom Frieden said Friday in a statement.

"Testing does not replace safety measures including consistent mask use, physical distancing, and hand washing," he said.

Alarming US Covid-19 trends: At least 24 states are now reporting more new cases than the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The country is averaging about 41,781 new cases daily and showed no progress last month in lowering its baseline -- something that could have potentially helped combat the surge that health officials say is coming.

Read the full story here.