King Tut's treasures are headed to Boston for the first time in 50 years

Leah Asmelash, CNNUpdated 16th January 2020
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(CNN) — A traveling collection of King Tut's treasures has already visited some of the world's biggest cities: Paris, Los Angeles and London.
Now, the Egyptian pharaoh's belongings are headed to Boston, marking the first time in more than 50 years that any of King Tut's artifacts have visited the city.
The exhibition will be on display at The Saunders Castle at Park Plaza beginning June 13.
A giant gold and black statue of an Egyptian tomb guardian is placed in Boston's City Hall Plaza to promote an immersive exhibit coming to Boston this June.
A giant gold and black statue of an Egyptian tomb guardian is placed in Boston's City Hall Plaza to promote an immersive exhibit coming to Boston this June.
David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Mayor Marty Walsh made the announcement Tuesday next to a 25-foot statue of King Tut in front of Boston City Hall. "It was really an opportunity for our city to really understand and learn about world history (and) showcase our city," Walsh said, according to CNN affiliate WCVB.
The traveling exhibition, called "King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh," consists of more than 150 original artifacts from King Tutankhamun's tomb, including 60 that have never left Egypt until this tour.
A sarcophagus is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
A sarcophagus is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
It is the largest amount of artifacts from the tomb to ever be publicly displayed, and one of 10 stops around the world before the tour brings the pieces home.
A statuette of Tutankhamun is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
A statuette of Tutankhamun is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
"See them, visit them, before they return back to Egypt forever," said Dr. Mostafa Waziry, secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, in a news release announcing the tour.
If you miss the Boston stop, the artifacts begin a six-month run at Sydney's Australian Museum in 2021.
A sculpture of ancient Egyptian deity Amun is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
A sculpture of ancient Egyptian deity Amun is displayed during the exhibition's visit to Paris.
STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Once the world tour is over, the artifacts will head home to Egypt where they will be permanently displayed at the Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo, which is currently being constructed.