Boris Johnson's bid for early election fails

7:29 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Deal or no-deal "Brexit poses serious human rights concerns," Amnesty International warns

Human rights group Amnesty International has warned of the consequences of Brexit -- no matter if a deal is achieved or not.

These include a potential shortage of access to food & medicine, as well as concerns over future of EU citizens in the UK, right to immigration & asylum, & the future of the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland," the group tweeted.

Amnesty International added that UK lawmakers and the government "must do all they can to ensure human rights of those living in UK are protected, not undermined," and called for leaders of all parties to make clear that the group's concerns "are met."

7:12 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Rebel MP announces he will not seek re-election

Former Conservative MP Richard Benyon -- who defied UK PM Boris Johnson last Tuesday and voted with opposition lawmakers to take control of the parliamentary agenda -- has tweeted that he will not seek re-election at the next general election.

Benyon was one of the 21 Conservative rebel MPs booted out of the parliamentary party as a result.

“As you know I was fully aware of the implications of voting the way I did last week and was not surprised when the whip was removed following the vote on Tuesday evening," Benyon said in a statement posted on his website on Monday.

"I recognize that I cannot stand as a Conservative candidate unless the whip is restored. That said, I have received many calls from colleagues saying that there are plans emerging for a “path back” for the so-called rebels.
"I have been giving much thought to how that could be achieved but feel now that I should let you know my clear intentions. I do not seek to be the candidate at the forthcoming election, whenever it is called."

Benyon added he will continue to serve as his constituency's MP until an election is called.

6:43 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

BREAKING: UK Government to suspend Parliament

Boris Johnson's government will prorogue Parliament at the end of Monday's sitting, the Prime Minister's official spokesperson has told journalists.

The spokesman added that the suspension will happen after Johnson tries to convince lawmakers to grant him a snap general election for the second time.

Unfortunately for the Prime Minister, that motion looks set to fail again, after opposition parties showed a united front on Friday, saying they would not support it.

The prorogation of parliament until October 14 -- a longer period than is usual -- has drawn wide condemnation by UK lawmakers, with some critics calling it a "constitutional outrage."

6:23 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Most EU countries don't want Brexit extension, Irish leader says

The EU would need a “good reason” to grant another Brexit delay, the Irish Prime Minister said on Monday, adding that most EU countries would “prefer not to have an extension."

“We will just move on to a new phase if there is no deal -- it will cause severe disruption for British and Irish people alike, not so much on the continent," Leo Varadkar said.

"Whatever happens, we will have to get back to the negotiating table quite quickly. And when we do, the first items on the agenda will be citizen’s rights, financial settlements and the Irish border.”

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar speaking with Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson earlier in a a joint press conference.
Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar speaking with Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson earlier in a a joint press conference. LORRAINE O'SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images

5:42 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

"No backstop is no deal for us," says Varadkar

Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has said that "in the absence of agreed alternative arrangements, no backstop is no deal for us."

He added: "All it does is kick the can down the road for another 14 months."

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Government Buildings.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Government Buildings. Charles McQuillan - Pool/Getty Images

5:31 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

A no-deal Brexit "would be a failure of statecraft," says Boris Johnson

UK PM Boris Johnson told reporters on Monday that a no-deal Brexit would be "a failure of statecraft," but reiterated that it is essential the UK leaves the EU by October 31.

"I have looked carefully at no-deal," Johnson said. "Yes, we could do it, the UK could certainly get through it, but be in no doubt that the outcome would be a failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible."

Johnson said "there are an abundance of proposals that we have," to resolve the thorny question of the Irish backstop, but added that he didn't think it "reasonable" to share them publicly.

5:30 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Johnson suggests Ireland "unity" arrangement

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

The UK Prime Minister told reporters he understands the importance of the Irish border and reiterated that the UK would not impose checks there.

It is "absolutely vital ... we keep the open border on the plan," Boris Johnson told reporters at a joint press conference with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar in Dublin.

But he added: "We need to find a way of ensuring that the UK is not kept locked in a backstop arrangement, while giving Ireland the assurance that it needs."

"Whether it's electronic pre-clearance or ... the unity of Ireland for agri-foods," Johnson said. "I don't underestimate the technical problems but I do think there is a way through."

5:19 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

Johnson insists he is "undaunted by whatever happens in Parliament"

When asked if he has the power to get anything through parliament, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson told reporters he was "absolutely undaunted by whatever ... takes place in Parliament."

"We will come out on October 31st and I'm sure .... parliamentarians will see the wisdom of doing that and respecting, honoring the referendum result."

"I'm absolutely undaunted by whatever ... takes place in parliament," he added. "I think what the British people want us to do is to deliver a deal."

5:17 a.m. ET, September 9, 2019

UK PM says he would "prefer" to find a Brexit deal

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has told reporters that "for the sake of business, farmers and millions of other people ... I want you to know that I will overwhelmingly prefer to find an agreement."

"I won't say we can do it all today, but I do believe a deal can be done by October 18th, so let's do it together," he stressed.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to the media ahead of his meeting with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to the media ahead of his meeting with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images