UK election results 2019: Boris Johnson storms to victory

63 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
10:41 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

BREAKING: Jeremy Corbyn says he will not lead the Labour Party into another election

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn appears beside other candidates at Sobell Leisure Centre for the Islington North constituency ahead of the vote count results. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn appears beside other candidates at Sobell Leisure Centre for the Islington North constituency ahead of the vote count results. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images

Jeremy Corbyn has said he'll stand aside as Labour leader before the next election, in his first remarks since the results started coming in.

"I will not lead the party in any future general election campaign," Corbyn announced after he was declared the winner of his constituency in north London.

But he added: "I will discuss with our party to ensure that there is a process of reflection now on this result and the policies of the party going forward and I will lead the party during that period to ensure that that discussion takes place and we move on into the future.”

That won't sit well with many Labour MPs and defeated candidates, who have made clear they want Corbyn gone immediately.

He lambasted the media for their "disgusting" treatment of him and his team during the election team.

Corbyn defended his policies as "extremely popular," but said, "Brexit has so polarized and divided debate in this country, it has over-ridden so much of a normal political debate."

Issues of inequality "will come back," he says, and Labour's fundamental message will "be there for all time."

10:29 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

We are now the racist party, says defeated Labour candidate

Labour has taken the Conservatives' mantle as the so-called "nasty party" due to Jeremy Corbyn's inaction over anti-Semitism, a defeated Labour candidate told Sky News.

"Jeremy Corbyn should announce that he’s resigning as leader of the Labour Party from his count today," Ruth Smeeth said after confirming she had lost her seat to the Conservatives. "He should have gone many, many, many months ago."

"There is absolutely no justification for why he’s still there," she added, saying Corbyn's "personal actions” have doomed Labour tonight.

Turning to the anti-Semitism scandal that has dogged Corbyn's leadership, she said he has "made us the nasty party. We are the racist party." The "nasty party" was the moniker given to the Conservatives by critics at the start of the century.

Ruth Smeeth speaks at an event on the fringe of the 2019 Labour Party conference in Brighton, England on September 22. Photo: Nicola Tree/Getty Images
Ruth Smeeth speaks at an event on the fringe of the 2019 Labour Party conference in Brighton, England on September 22. Photo: Nicola Tree/Getty Images

11:03 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

A big name in Northern Ireland politics is out

Big news from Northern Ireland. Nigel Dodds, who's the leader in Westminster of the Democratic Unionist Party, has lost his seat to a candidate from Sinn Fein, a party from the opposite side of the historic sectarian divide in that part of the country.

The Green Party and the moderate nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) had not put up candidates in Belfast North to avoid splitting the remain vote. This strategy gave Sinn Fein's John Finucane -- the dominant nationalist force in the constituency -- the best shot of beating long-time DUP incumbent Dodds.

An election poster features Nigel Dodds in north Belfast on December 12. Photo: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images
An election poster features Nigel Dodds in north Belfast on December 12. Photo: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

11:04 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

Revised projections are out and the Conservatives are still ahead

British broadcasters have updated their predictions based on partial results, showing a slightly smaller majority for the Conservatives than predicted earlier. 

They've slid the Conservatives down to 357 (from 368). And don't call it a comeback -- this is still a very comfortable majority for the Tories -- but Labour are up to 201.

11:05 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

Boris Johnson's father is accused of making an Islamophobic remark on TV

Stanley Johnson, father of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, participates in a demonstration in London on October 9. Photo: Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images
Stanley Johnson, father of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, participates in a demonstration in London on October 9. Photo: Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images

Stanley Johnson, father of Boris Johnson, has come under criticism for making allegedly Islamophobic comments during a live election night show on the UK's Channel 4.

He said: "If I was a female fighter jet pilot, I would expect someone to say 'don't wear a burqa.'"

A fellow panelist on the show labelled the comment as "disgraceful".

Boris Johnson has been accused of Islamophobia in the past, having previously said in a newspaper column that women in burqas "look like letter boxes".

Niqabs and burqas were at the center of a controversy involving Boris Johnson last year, when he likened Muslim women who wear veils to "letter boxes" and "bank robbers" in his column for the Daily Telegraph newspaper.

He has since partially apologized, saying at the launch of his bid to become Prime Minister this summer: "In so far as my words have given offense over the last twenty or thirty years when I've been a journalist and people have taken those words out of my articles and escalated them. Of course, I am sorry for the offense they have caused."

On the same show tonight, the Canadian comedian Katherine Ryan confronted Boris Johnson's father on the issue of single motherhood.

That came shortly after his son was criticized for a 1995 newspaper column in which he called the children of single mothers "ill-raised, ignorant, aggressive and illegitimate".

10:06 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

EU ready to take "next steps" in Brexit negotiations, says European Council President

President of the European Council Charles Michel speaks in Brussels early on Friday. Photo: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images
President of the European Council Charles Michel speaks in Brussels early on Friday. Photo: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images

The European Union stands ready to take the “next steps” in reaching a deal on the final Withdrawal Agreement with the United Kingdom, whatever the result of Thursday’s election, European Council President Charles Michel said Friday morning in Brussels. 

“About the outcome of the elections in the UK, we will wait to see what will be the official results. But there is a strong message … tomorrow we’ll have a discussion in the European Council on Article 50 and you know that we are ready for the next steps,” the European Council President said during a press conference in the early hours of Friday.

“We will see if it is possible for the British parliament to accept the Withdrawal Agreement, to take a decision. And, if it is the case, we are ready for the next steps,” Michel added, asserting that the EU remains committed to maintaining “close cooperation” with the UK.

Speaking to members of the press alongside the European Council President, European Commission President Ursula Von der Leyen said the EU is “ready to negotiate” whatever the result.

Their comments follow a meeting of European Heads of State on Thursday in Brussels to discuss the EU’s action against climate change and the bloc’s long-term budget.

9:44 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

Jeremy Corbyn has arrived for his count (and will have to speak soon)

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn arrives for the vote count at Sobell Leisure Centre in Islington North and South constituencies. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn arrives for the vote count at Sobell Leisure Centre in Islington North and South constituencies. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has appeared at his count in Islington, north London, on what appears to be a disastrous night for the party.

Corbyn looked sullen but managed some smiles for people greeting him at the counting center. He has mostly stayed with his team of aides, and hasn't made any public statements since polls closed.

But when he wins his seat (a foregone conclusion in super-safe Labour territory) he'll have to break his silence.

Corbyn, with wife Laura Alvarez, talks to workers during the Islington North and South count. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images
Corbyn, with wife Laura Alvarez, talks to workers during the Islington North and South count. Photo: Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images

9:29 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

A Labour MP has already offered to replace Corbyn and the results are still being called

Jeremy Corbyn is still the Labour leader -- but the poor performance by his party so far has led to widespread speculation that he will be forced to step down.

Now, Jess Phillips -- a popular, more moderate MP in the Midlands -- has suggested she'll stand in a future Labour leadership contest.

An emotional Phillips was asked by ITV whether she'll run, to which Phillips nodded and made an affirmative sound.

"If people trust me then yes, I will take a role in rebuilding," she said, before adding: "This isn't about headlines, this is about people's lives."

Labour candidate Jess Phillips is photographed in her constituency in Yardley, Birmingham on November 13. Photo: Nicola Tree/ Getty Images
Labour candidate Jess Phillips is photographed in her constituency in Yardley, Birmingham on November 13. Photo: Nicola Tree/ Getty Images

Phillips is far further to the center than Corbyn, and her election would likely not be favored by the Momentum group within the Labour Party.

But she has the benefit of being from a seat in the Midlands; the party would be expected to look towards winning back the north and the Midlands as it elects its next leader, which is bad news for Remain-leaning London politicians like Keir Starmer and Emily Thornberry -- but it's great news for potential candidates away from the capital.

9:25 p.m. ET, December 12, 2019

Boris Johnson and Scotland are on collision course

A party official observes as staff count ballotsin Glasgow. Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
A party official observes as staff count ballotsin Glasgow. Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Boris Johnson and Scotland are on a collision course.

Nicola Sturgeon’s pro-independence Scottish National Party looks set to do just as well on its home turf as Johnson’s Conservatives are doing down south.

The new Tory majority suggested by exit polls will guarantee that Brexit will happen and that means that Scotland will be dragged out of the European Union against its will.

This is a scenario that is a recipe for antagonism between the SNP and London. Politically, Scotland and England will look like entirely different countries. That will create huge new pressure from the SNP for another independence referendum.

It doesn’t necessarily follow that everyone voting for the SNP wants to leave the UK. Given Labour’s eclipse in Scotland — a former heartland and the failure of the Liberal Democrats — the SNP may have been a refuge for homeless Remain voters.

Many of the economic concerns that prompted Scotland to turn down independence in the referendum by a 10% margin in 2014 still apply. 

And Boris Johnson, who after all leads the Conservative and Unionist Party, has said he will not grant Scotland another referendum. His big majority means he won’t have to.

But if the SNP follows its bumper night on Thursday with another landslide in the elections for the Scottish parliament in 2021 — perhaps on an independence platform, the tensions between Scotland and London could become unsustainable.

A big Tory majority will also send shockwaves through the tortured politics of Northern Ireland. Many unionists see Johnson’s Brexit deal as a betrayal. There are fears that Brexit will revive the buried ghosts of the Troubles.

The Tory win will also fuel speculation that in the years to come the ties to the mainland among younger, more pro-European unionist voters will begin to fade. South of the border of course Ireland will remain in the European Union.

By no means is the United Kingdom safe yet.