June 10 coronavirus news

By Meg Wagner, Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 0000 GMT (0800 HKT) June 11, 2021
23 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
7:49 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

The US needs a Covid-19 vaccine for children because "we're not past the pandemic," says FDA adviser

From CNN’s Lauren Mascarenhas

Advisers to the US Food and Drug Administration agree that it’s important to have a Covid-19 vaccine for children, though there’s some disagreement over how potential vaccines are researched and authorized, FDA adviser Dr. Paul Offit said Thursday.

The FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee met Thursday to discuss what kind of information the FDA needs to consider ahead of authorizing a vaccine for children 12 and under.

“I'm confident that there was unanimity among the advisers that it's important to have a vaccine for children,” Offit told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

Offit noted that the advisers have differing views on issues like what kind of information should be considered among the different age groups under 12, and how many children should be included in trials. 

“I certainly think we would have a vaccine by early next year, and hopefully we'll have a vaccine for the 6-to-12-year-old by the end of the year,” he said.

“If we're past the pandemic – if this is all behind us – then that's not going to be an issue, but we're not past the pandemic,” Offit added. “The variants are still out there and becoming more contagious. I think when the winter comes, you're going to see this virus surge again, so we still need a vaccine.”

6:29 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

CDC will no longer order people to wear masks in outdoor areas of public transportation

From CNN's Lauren Mascarenhas

People wait at a bus stop on April 8 in Providence, Rhode Island.
People wait at a bus stop on April 8 in Providence, Rhode Island. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People who are fully vaccinated against Covid-19 will no longer have to wear masks in outdoor areas of public transportation, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.

People who are not yet vaccinated should continue wearing masks in these areas, the CDC noted.

The CDC issued an order in January requiring people to wear masks on public transportation to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

The CDC said it plans to update its face masks order to reflect the change and to better align with its guidance for fully vaccinated people. Until then, the agency will “exercise its enforcement discretion” to not require masks in outdoor areas of transportation conveyances or hubs.

“While those who are fully vaccinated may resume many activities without wearing a mask, the travel environment presents a unique set of circumstances based on the number and close interaction of travelers (both vaccinated and unvaccinated),” the CDC noted.

The agency maintains that both vaccinated and unvaccinated people should continue to wear masks indoors in public transportation settings, except under certain circumstances, like when eating, drinking or taking medicine.

6:13 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

5 states have not yet vaccinated half of adult residents against Covid-19, CDC data shows

From CNN's Deidre McPhillips

Kelly Mooneyham and Karen Willmore of Adhere Rx wait for COVID-19 vaccine recipients at a pop-up vaccination clinic in Portland, Tennessee, on April 22.
Kelly Mooneyham and Karen Willmore of Adhere Rx wait for COVID-19 vaccine recipients at a pop-up vaccination clinic in Portland, Tennessee, on April 22.

In five states — Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Wyoming — fewer than half of adult residents have received one dose of Covid-19 vaccine, according to data published Thursday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the US overall, 64% of adults have received at least one dose of Covid-19 vaccine and about 53% are fully vaccinated. The Biden administration aims to vaccinate 70% of adults with at least one dose of vaccine by July 4, though the current pace of vaccinations is not enough to meet that goal.

About 934,000 more doses have been reported administered since Wednesday, for a seven-day average of 1.1 million doses per day. 

More than 172 million people – about 52% of the total US population – have received at least one dose of Covid-19 vaccine, and nearly 142 million people – about 43% of the population – are fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

A total of nearly 207 million doses of vaccine have been reported administered, about 82% of the nearly 373 million doses delivered.

Note: Data published by the CDC may be delayed, and doses may not have been administered on the day reported.

6:07 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

Novavax expects coronavirus vaccine Phase 3 trial data "next week," CEO says

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

Researchers at the UW Medicine Retrovirology Lab at Harborview Medical Center work on samples from the Novavax phase 3 Covid-19 clinical vaccine trials on February 12 in Seattle.
Researchers at the UW Medicine Retrovirology Lab at Harborview Medical Center work on samples from the Novavax phase 3 Covid-19 clinical vaccine trials on February 12 in Seattle. Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Biotechnology company Novavax expects to see results from a Phase 3 study of its coronavirus vaccine in the United States "next week," the company's CEO Stanley Erck said on Thursday.

"We're just finishing up a Phase 3 trial in the US where we enrolled a group of 30,000 people — 20,000 of those people got vaccinated, 10,000 had placebo— and I'm happy to say that the data are coming very soon. In fact, we hope to announce those data next week," Erck said during an event with Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan at Novavax's global headquarters in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

The event was held to tour the company's future Vaccines Innovation Campus facility.

Erck also said Dr. Robert Redfield, former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has joined the company Novavax as a strategic adviser.

"It was just a year ago that Novavax enrolled our first participants in a clinical trial," Erck said. "Since then, we've worked around the clock to vaccinate over 50,000 people in the last year."

5:30 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

FDA's vaccine advisers debate urgency of vaccinating kids against coronavirus

From CNN's Maggie Fox

Vaccine advisers to the US Food and Drug Administration on Thursday debated what kind of detailed information the agency would need to consider authorizing the use of coronavirus vaccines in children under age 12.

While a few advisers said it’s far too soon to consider using vaccines in children because kids are at such low risk from the virus, most argued that it’s important to have authorizations on hand should there be a resurgence of the virus in the fall and winter.

The members of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee were not asked to provide specific advice or a vote. The FDA will now advise companies on what kinds of clinical trials and data it would like to see to consider extending use of authorized vaccines to children.

Dr. Cody Meissner, director of pediatric infectious diseases at Tufts University School of Medicine, said children are at low risk of severe disease from the virus and more study is needed about safety in younger age groups.  “Before we start vaccinating millions of adolescents and children, it’s important to find out what the consequences are,” Meissner said, noting a low hospitalization rate among children.

“As more people are immunized and become immune from infection, I think it’s likely that we are going to get this pandemic under pretty good control,” he said.

But other members of the committee sharply disagreed.

“I think we need these vaccines sooner rather than later in children,” said Dr. Mark Sawyer, a pediatrics professor at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

Dr. Eric Rubin, editor in chief of The New England Journal of Medicine and an adjunct professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, noted the situation doesn’t look bad at present, but that could change.

“There’s not much disease right now,” he said.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen. I think that’s precisely the reason why we want to have these in our arsenal. Because we give an EUA to the vaccine doesn’t mean we have to use it and I think we’d have to think hard how to use it, given all the concerns that’s been raised,” Rubin added.

And the FDA’s Marion Gruber expressed some frustration. 

“We are hearing that we need the vaccines soon and we need them soon in children because we do not know what the virus will doing in fall and kids are back in school and indoors,” she said. 

“If we wait too long and do these clinical trials with large numbers of pediatric subjects, we may not be ready to have these tools available when we need them.”

“Achieving consensus, as people can see, may be a little bit challenging,” noted Dr. Peter Marks, who heads the FDA’s division that evaluates vaccines.

6:02 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

No shipments of J&J's Covid-19 vaccine have gone out from the government in weeks, official says

From CNN’s Kaitlan Collins

Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 Janssen Vaccine boxes sit in a locked refrigerator at the US Department of Veterans Affairs' VA Boston Healthcare System's Jamaica Plain Medical Center in Boston on March 4.
Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 Janssen Vaccine boxes sit in a locked refrigerator at the US Department of Veterans Affairs' VA Boston Healthcare System's Jamaica Plain Medical Center in Boston on March 4. Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images

No shipments of Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine have gone out from the federal government in several weeks, CNN has learned, because the one-shot vaccine is in short supply.

The government has not sent any doses of J&J to states since the first week of May, an official told CNN. That figure checks out with data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on vaccine shipments.

This is directly linked to the issues related to the Emergent BioSolutions plant in Baltimore. The facility, which has been riddled with issues, has still not produced a single useable dose of J&J’s vaccine as it waits for regulatory approval from the US Food and Drug Administration, which has not yet been granted.

5:17 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

Top FDA official reminds vaccine advisers that kids do die of coronavirus

From CNN's Maggie Fox

The coronavirus pandemic might not have hit children as hard as it has hit adults, but children do die of Covid-19, a top US Food and Drug Administration official said Thursday.

Dr. Peter Marks, who heads FDA’s vaccine division, spoke at the very end of a meeting of the agency’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting, called to discuss what might be needed for FDA to consider extending authorization of coronavirus vaccines to children under 12.

Several advisers were cautious about the idea of extending authorization to children and mentioned that the virus has caused serious disease in children as often as it has among adults.

“I also want to take a moment to remember all the children who have died of Covid-19 in this pandemic, because that should not be forgotten here,” Marks told the meeting in closing remarks. 

“I just want to reiterate something here – this is an illness that takes the lives of children. We know that over 300 children have died in the pandemic so far,” said Marks, who is director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it has reports of 314 deaths in children 17 and younger in the US from Covid-19.

“And that if one looked at the death rate of the 11-17-year-olds who had Covid-19, it was about 1 in 3,600 of those individuals. And since we had over a million cases in that age range, you can see that there are deaths due to this,” Marks added. 

“All of us have the goal to eliminate any vaccine-preventable deaths that we can with a reasonable benefit-risk.”

5:50 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

New Hampshire's Covid-19 state of emergency expires at midnight on Friday

From CNN’s Rebekah Riess

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu, left, speaks during a press conference in Concord, New Hampshire, on June 10.
New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu, left, speaks during a press conference in Concord, New Hampshire, on June 10. Pool/WMUR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu announced Thursday that the state’s Covid-19 state of emergency will end at midnight on Friday night and that he would not be renewing it.

Sununu said the state of emergency “is no longer necessary to manage the remaining pieces of the pandemic.” 

However, the governor said a public health incident will remain in place, allowing health care providers and the state’s Department of Health and Human Services to coordinate continued Covid-19 efforts.

"I can remember going back to the moments before that day, where we said, 'wow, we hope that we wouldn't have to get to a state of emergency,' and then things moving so fast," Sununu said, remembering the early days of the pandemic.

According to Dr. Beth Daly, chief of the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control, the state didn’t order any new vaccine doses this week and ordered only half of its normal allocation last week. "Our supply is exceeding demand," Daly said.

State epidemiologist Dr. Benjamin Chan, however, noted that the pandemic isn't over, despite New Hampshire’s state of emergency expiring on Friday.

4:37 p.m. ET, June 10, 2021

American Academy of Pediatrics updates guidelines for children returning to sports and activities

From CNN's Sarah Braner

The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its guidance for children returning to sports and physical activity, urging eligible people to be vaccinated against Covid-19 and encouraging unvaccinated people to wear masks during many activities.

All eligible athletes should get a Covid-19 vaccine as soon as possible, the guidelines say. Once people are vaccinated, they are advised to follow US Disease Control and Prevention guidance for vaccinated individuals, which say they do not need to wear a mask in most situations. 

Unvaccinated athletes should wear a mask for all indoor activity except situations in which a mask may pose a hazard. For outdoor activities, AAP recommends that unvaccinated athletes wear a mask while on the sidelines and in all activities involving sustained contact of 3 feet or less. 

“Parents and spectators should follow current local regulations for physical distancing and use of face masks,” the academy said in a news release about the update. “Because indoor areas have higher rates of COVID-19 transmission, all spectators, regardless of vaccine status, should consider wearing a face mask during sporting events with limited spacing.” 

Because Covid-19 transmission is reduced outdoors, a mask may not be required for all activities that take place outside, the guidelines say.

Additionally, athletes with Covid-19 who display mild symptoms or are asymptomatic are no longer advised to see a doctor for clearance, the academy says; a phone call or telemedicine visit to screen for cardiac symptoms and update record will work, and allow for faster return to activities.

Children and teenagers who have not been consistently active for more than one month are advised to make a gradual return to activity, AAP says. The academy recommends they start at 25% of their usual volume and intensity of activity and increase volume and intensity by 10% per week.