June 23 coronavirus news

By Meg Wagner, Melissa Mahtani, Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 2039 GMT (0439 HKT) June 23, 2021
7 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
9:18 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

10% of the world’s population is fully vaccinated against Covid-19, data shows

From CNN ’s Deidre McPhillips

A health worker administers a dose of the Covid-19 coronavirus CoronaVac vaccine at Bang Sue Central Railway Station in Bangkok on June 22.
A health worker administers a dose of the Covid-19 coronavirus CoronaVac vaccine at Bang Sue Central Railway Station in Bangkok on June 22. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

Globally, about 10% of the population – more than 782 million people – is fully vaccinated against Covid-19, according to Our World in Data

But vaccination coverage varies greatly by region and by a country’s income level. 

More than 30% of people in North America and 28% of people in Europe are fully vaccinated, compared to about 11% in South America and 8% in Asia. In Africa, less than 1% of the population is vaccinated against Covid-19, according to Our World in Data.  

And vaccination coverage in high-income nations (28.5%) is more than 10 times that of lower-middle-income nations (2.7%). In low-income nations, only about 0.1% of the population is fully vaccinated. 

Among the most vaccinated nations are: Israel (60%), Bahrain (54%), Mongolia (52%), Hungary (47%), the United States (45%) and Uruguay (41%).

Among the least vaccinated nations are: Kenya (0.4%), Ukraine (0.8%), Pakistan (2%), Australia (3%) and India (4%.).

9:10 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

CDC director: Nearly every new Covid-19 death is now entirely preventable in America

From CNN's Madeline Holcombe

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky speaks during a White House briefing on June 22.
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky speaks during a White House briefing on June 22. White House

The dangerous Delta variant poses a risk to the United States as the country works to ease out of the Covid-19 pandemic, but experts say the nation has the tools needed to overcome the threat – if the public takes advantage of them.

"Covid-19 vaccines are available for everyone ages 12 and up," US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said at a White House briefing Tuesday.

"They are nearly 100% effective against severe disease and death – meaning nearly every death due to Covid-19 is particularly tragic, because nearly every death, especially among adults, due to Covid-19 is at this point entirely preventable."

Those still dying from Covid-19 in the US are "overwhelmingly" unvaccinated, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNN's Jake Tapper.

As of Tuesday night, 65.5% of the adult population in the US has received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, according to the CDC. While that seems close to the goal set by President Joe Biden to have 70% of American adults at least partially vaccinated by July 4, experts are concerned about declining vaccination rates and the difficulty in motivating those still hesitant to get inoculated.

"This virus is an opportunist," Walensky said. "As long as there are those who are not vaccinated, Covid-19 will remain a threat."

The Delta variant, which is believed to be more transmissible and more dangerous, is the "greatest threat" to the United States' progress against the virus, Fauci said Tuesday during the White House briefing.

Fauci said he thinks a return to the high virus surges of 2020 is unlikely, but communities continuing to hold out against vaccination could experience localized surges as the summer continues.

"Good news, our vaccines are effective against the Delta variant ... we have the tools," he said.

8:55 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

The US is expected to miss Biden's July 4 vaccine goal, so the White House will focus on a new milestone

From CNN's Kaitlan Collins

Health care workers provide vaccinations at a drive-thru clinic on June 10 in Columbus, Ohio.
Health care workers provide vaccinations at a drive-thru clinic on June 10 in Columbus, Ohio. Jay LaPrete/AP

President Biden's top coronavirus official will focus on new vaccination milestones at the White House Tuesday as the country is expected to fall short of his stated goal of having 70% of US adults receive at least one Covid vaccine shot by July 4. 

In remarks Tuesday, Biden's coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients will highlight that 70% of Americans 30 and older have received at least one shot, an administration official told CNN. Officials expect that 70% of Americans 27 and older have received at least one Covid-19 vaccine shot soon. 

Biden has not yet publicly acknowledged that he is unlikely to meet his July 4 goal. Despite that, White House officials are moving ahead with their plans for a big celebration on the South Lawn, where about 1,000 guests are expected to attend. The view inside the administration is that there is still reason to celebrate given most of the country has started to return to normal.

Officials have downplayed the expectation that the President is set to miss his first vaccination target since taking office.

"We've made tremendous progress in our vaccination efforts to date, and the ultimate goal has been to get America back to normal, as you said, and we're looking forward to doing that even here at the White House," press secretary Jen Psaki said this week.

According to the official, Zients plans to say Tuesday that the federal government's new focus is on those in the 18 to 26 age range.

8:47 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

Alcohol sales and beverages banned from Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games 

From CNN's Sophie Jeong

Tokyo 2020 Olympics Organising Committee president Seiko Hashimoto, right, and CEO Toshiro Muto attend a news conference in Tokyo on June 23.
Tokyo 2020 Olympics Organising Committee president Seiko Hashimoto, right, and CEO Toshiro Muto attend a news conference in Tokyo on June 23. Issei Kato/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Alcohol sales and beverages will be banned from the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, President of the Games, Seiko Hashimoto, said in a news briefing Wednesday.

"Regarding the sale and provision of alcoholic beverages to spectators at the venue, considering the current rule in the society and from the standpoint of avoiding loud voices and safe guiding of the spectators, we have been studying about this matter and we decided as Tokyo 2020 to not sell alcoholic beverages and ban drinking alcoholic beverages in the venue," Hashimoto said in the briefing, one month ahead of when the Games are expected to take place.

8:42 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

You can do whatever you want on July 4 if you’re vaccinated, Fauci says 

From CNN's Naomi Thomas

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, gives an opening statement during a hearing on May 11 in Washington, DC.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, gives an opening statement during a hearing on May 11 in Washington, DC. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on NBC’s Today show Wednesday that the Delta variant will dominate in many parts of the US in several weeks to a month – but fully vaccinated people can do all the things they want on July 4. 

Fauci said the Delta variant has “exploded” in the UK and said that the doubling time of the variant is around two weeks. 

“Right now, it’s at 20%, Savannah, of our isolates, so you would expect just the doubling time, you know, in several weeks to a month or so, it’s going to be quite dominant,” Fauci told NBC’s Savannah Guthrie. However, the vaccines that are being distributed now work well against this “problematic variant.” 

The people that concern Fauci are those who are unvaccinated. 

“It’s very difficult. We’re beyond, Savannah, the larger mass vaccination program. Right now, it’s got to be in the trenches,” he said, when asked how he would explain the large numbers of unvaccinated people. 

“Many people just need more information. They’ve let it go, they haven’t paid attention to it,” he said. “They have to start paying attention to it now, because if they are unvaccinated, they are at risk. Whereas those who are vaccinated can have a great Fourth of July, I mean, you could just do all the things you want to do on the Fourth of July if, in fact, you’re vaccinated.”  
8:34 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

Uganda Olympic team athlete in Japan tests positive for Covid-19

From CNN's Chie Kobayashi and Duarte Mendonca

A member of the Uganda Olympic team has tested positive for coronavirus on Wednesday, a Division of Izumisano City official, Takahide Matsufuji, said over the phone to CNN. 

The athlete, who is in his 20s, was found positive via a PCR test and moved to a location designated by the public health centre.

Four city officials have also been considered to be possible close contact and self-quarantining at home.

The news come just a day after a local official announced on Tuesday that nine members of the Ugandan Olympic team were asked to quarantine in Japan, after a coach tested positive for coronavirus upon arrival.

The Uganda Olympic team, who arrived at Narita airport on Sunday, made their way via bus to Izumisano City where their training camp is based, while the coach was kept at the airport to then be placed into a government-designated facility for quarantine, the same official said. All were fully vaccinated and tested negative before departure for Japan. 

More information regarding Uganda’s team training situation is expected to be discussed by the public health centre and the city, the official added

8:26 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

Delta could soon be the dominant strain in areas with low vaccination rates, Fauci says 

From CNN's Naomi Thomas

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 26.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 26. Sarah Silbiger/AFP/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on CBS This Morning Wednesday the Delta variant could be the dominant strain in areas of the US that have low vaccination rates in a matter of weeks. 

While the variant spreads more efficiently and data from the UK indicate that it makes people more seriously ill, Fauci said the vaccines in use in the US work well against it. 

“It will be the dominant strain among those areas, those regions of the country where the vaccination rate is lower than we would like,” Fauci said when asked if he was expecting Delta to be the dominant strain in a matter of weeks. “For those areas where you have a high vaccination rate, you’re not going to see that. Again, another powerful reason why we need to get vaccinated.”