Derek Chauvin is on trial for George Floyd's death

By Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes, Meg Wagner, Melissa Mahtani, Veronica Rocha and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 0211 GMT (1011 HKT) April 1, 2021
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11:23 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Store surveillance video played during Chauvin trial

Pool
Pool

New footage from inside Cup Foods – the convenience store on the corner of 38th and Chicago in Minneapolis, where Floyd was taken into custody by police – is being played at the trial this morning.

Store clerk Christopher Martin is on the stand testifying while the video is being played.

In the video, Floyd can be seen inside the store. Martin, who talked to Floyd while he was in the store, testified that he believed Floyd was under the influence.

At one point, the video shows Martin selling Floyd a pack of cigarettes. Martin can be seen in the footage holding up the $20 bill that Floyd gave him for the cigarettes.

"When I saw the bill, I noticed it had a blue pigment to it, kind of like a $100 bill would have. I found that odd. I assumed that it was fake," Martin said.

Martin's testimony is ongoing.

Watch a portion of the surveillance video played during the Chauvin trial:

10:59 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Cup Foods employee is now testifying in the Chauvin trial

Pool
Pool

Christopher Martin, 19, who was working at Cup Foods on May 25, 2020, is now testifying.

He said that he talked to George Floyd inside the store that day. Martin said that when Floyd came into the store, Martin asked him if he played baseball. Martin said Floyd told him he played football.

Asked what Floyd's condition was like when he was talking to him, Martin said, "When I asked him if he played baseball, he went on to respond to that, but it kind of took him a little long to get to what he was trying to say." 

Martin added, "it would appear that he was high."

He said he sold Floyd cigarettes.

Martin is currently being questioned on the stand by the prosecution.

Watch the moment:

10:37 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

NOW: Off-duty firefighter who witnessed Floyd's death resumes testimony 

From CNN's Eric Levenson and Aaron Cooper

Pool
Pool

The third day of testimony at Derek Chauvin's trial just began. 

Witness testimony will continue with Genevieve Hansen, a trained EMT and Minneapolis firefighter.

Hansen took the stand yesterday, and testified that she witnessed George Floyd's death when she was out for a walk on her day off. She said she wanted to render aid to Floyd and repeatedly asked police to check for a pulse. They refused.

Prosecutors played video footage that featured Hansen pleading with the officers to check Floyd's pulse.

"I tried calm reasoning, I tried to be assertive, I pled and was desperate," she testified. "I was desperate to give help."

She, too, called 911 afterward to report what police had done. Her call was the third such report.

The bystanders' harrowing testimony furthered the prosecution's opening pitch to jurors, which focused on video of the 9 minutes and 29 seconds that Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck.

9:54 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Day 3 of testimony in Derek Chauvin's trial starts soon. Here's what we know about the death of George Floyd.

A poster with George Floyd's picture hangs from a security fence outside the Hennepin County Government Center on March 30 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
A poster with George Floyd's picture hangs from a security fence outside the Hennepin County Government Center on March 30 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images

The murder trial of former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin will continue today with further questioning of witnesses.

Chauvin faces of second-degree unintentional murder, second-degree manslaughter and third-degree murder for the May 2020 death of George Floyd.

Here's a recap of the case that spurred widespread protests against police brutality and racism:

  • May 25: Floyd, 46, died after pleading for help as Chauvin kneeled on Flloyd’s neck to pin him – unarmed and handcuffed – to the ground. Floyd had been arrested for allegedly using a counterfeit bill at a convenience store, police have said.
  • May 26: It is announced that four Minneapolis police officers have been fired for their involvement in the death of Floyd.
  • May 27: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order activating the Minnesota National Guard after protests and demonstrations erupt throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul.
  • Also on May 27: Surveillance video from outside a Minneapolis restaurant was released and appears to contradict police claims that Floyd resisted arrest before an officer knelt on his neck.
  • May 28 to 29: Several buildings were damaged and the Minneapolis police department’s Third Precinct was set ablaze during protests.
  • May 29: Chauvin is arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter, according to Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman.
  • June 3: Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison announced charges of aiding and abetting second-degree murder for the three previously uncharged officers.
  • July 15: Floyd’s family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Minneapolis and the police officers involved in his death.
  • October 21: A Hennepin County judge drops the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin (This charge would later be reinstated due to an appeals court ruling.)
  • March 12: The Minneapolis city council unanimously voted to approve a $27 million settlement with Floyd’s family.

8:59 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

The trial's jurors will remain unnamed and unseen, but here's what we know about them

From CNN's Eric Levenson and Aaron Cooper

The jury in Derek Chauvin's trial has heard from a series of witnesses so far, and they've been shown bystander and police footage of George Floyd's final moments. 

If convicted, Chauvin could face up to 40 years in prison for second-degree murder, up to 25 years for third-degree murder, and up to 10 years for second-degree manslaughter. The charges are to be considered separate, so Chauvin could be convicted of all, some or none of them.

While the jurors are unnamed and unseen on camera, we do know basic details about them.

Here's what we know about the jury:

  • Five men and nine women were chosen to serve on the jury during the trial in Minneapolis. 
  • Of the 14 jurors, eight are White, four are Black and two are mixed race, according to how the court says the jurors identified themselves.
  • The jury selection process began March 9 at the Hennepin County Government Center and wrapped up exactly two weeks later. 
  • The panel is made up of 12 jurors and two alternates, Judge Peter Cahill said.
  • The jurors all come from Hennepin County, which is demographically about 74% White and 14% Black, according to census data.
  • The prospective jurors previously completed a 16-page questionnaire that asked for their personal thoughts on Black Lives Matter, policing and other topics.
  • In court, each person was sworn in and then questioned one-by-one in a process known as voir dire. The juror's name, address and other information are kept anonymous.
  • Eric Nelson questioned the prospective jurors for the defense, while Steve Schleicher questioned them for the prosecution.

Read more about about the jury here.

8:25 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Minneapolis firefighter resumes testimony today

Minneapolis Firrefighter Genevieve Hansen testifies on March 30 at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Minneapolis Firrefighter Genevieve Hansen testifies on March 30 at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Court TV/Pool/AP

Witness testimony will continue at 10:30 a.m. ET with Genevieve Hansen, a trained EMT and Minneapolis firefighter.

Hansen took the stand yesterday and testified that she was walking by the scene on May 25, 2020 when she saw Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd.

Prosecutors played video footage that featured Hansen pleading with the officers to check Floyd's pulse.

She said she should have called 911 "immediately" after arriving on the scene. Hansen said once the ambulance left with Floyd, she stood there on the sidewalk in "disbelief."

"I should have called 911 immediately but I didn't and when things calmed down I realized that I wanted them to know what was going on. I wanted to basically report it," she added.

Hansen told prosecutors that she felt "helpless" and was upset about what she saw.

When the prosecutor asked her why she felt helpless, she said, "because there was a man being killed, and I would have... had I had access to a call similar to that, I would have been able to provide medical attention to the best of my abilities and this human was denied that."

8:39 a.m. ET, March 31, 2021

Witnesses are testifying about the death of George Floyd. Here's what happened Tuesday.

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Witness Donald Williams answers questions on March 30 in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Witness Donald Williams answers questions on March 30 in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Court TV/Pool/AP

Feelings of horror and fear were recalled in a Minneapolis court Tuesday as a series of bystanders testified about what it was like to witness George Floyd slowly die under the knee of former police officer Derek Chauvin last May.

Six bystanders testified on the second day of Chauvin's criminal trial: a 9-year-old girl, three high school students, a mixed martial arts fighter and a Minneapolis firefighter.

Prosecutors

The state has stayed focused on video of the 9 minutes and 29 seconds that Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck. They told the jury, "You can believe your eyes that it's a homicide," prosecuting attorney Jerry Blackwell said Monday.

The defense

Defense attorney Eric Nelson argued that the case was more complicated than just that video. He said Chauvin was following his police use of force training and argued Floyd's cause of death was a combination of drug use and preexisting health issues.

He also said that the bystanders morphed into a threatening crowd, which distracted the officers. During cross-examinations of some witnesses, he tried to get them to admit they and the crowd were angry.

The off-duty firefighter

Genevieve Hansen, a Minneapolis firefighter and trained EMT, was out for a walk on her day off. She testified that when she saw the Floyd incident in front of Cup Foods, she tried to help, but former officer Tou Thao refused her access to treat Floyd.

In cell phone video that she recorded, Hansen is heard telling officers to check his pulse, but she says she didn't see any of them do it.

She later called 911, but said she should have called "immediately." After Floyd was taken away in an ambulance, she testified that she stood on the sidewalk in shock at what she just saw.

The MMA fighter

Donald Wynn Williams II, a bystander and MMA fighter, said that Chauvin performed a "blood choke" on Floyd and adjusted his positioning several times to maintain pressure on Floyd's neck. He said he wanted to get Chauvin off Floyd but didn't physically intervene because Thao was directing him to stay away.

"I just was really trying to keep my professionalism and make sure I speak out for Floyd's life because I felt like he was in very much danger," he said.

During cross-examination, Williams acknowledged that he had repeatedly called Chauvin and Thao names and yelled at them even after Floyd had been taken away in an ambulance. Yet he rejected defense attorney Eric Nelson's description that he had grown "angry" on the scene.

The charges

Chauvin faces a second-degree murder charge, a third-degree murder charge and a second-degree manslaughter charge.

He could be convicted of all, some, or none of the charges. Minnesota's sentencing guidelines recommend about 12.5 years in prison for each murder charge and about four years for the manslaughter charge.

What's next

Witness testimony in the trial is expected to last about four weeks, followed by jury deliberations.

HLN's Mike Galanos and CNN's Omar Jimenez recap day 2 of the trial and offer a preview of what is to come today: