Derek Chauvin guilty in death of George Floyd

By Mike Hayes, Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani, Meg Wagner, Veronica Rocha and Joshua Berlinger, CNN

Updated 0406 GMT (1206 HKT) April 21, 2021
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5:30 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Derek Chauvin found guilty on all charges in the death of George Floyd

From CNN’s Aaron Cooper in Minneapolis

Pool
Pool

Former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin has been convicted on all charges by a jury in the Hennepin County court.   

The 12 jurors found him guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd's death in May 2020.

The maximum sentence for second-degree unintentional murder is imprisonment of not more than 40 years. The maximum sentence for third-degree murder is imprisonment of not more than 25 years. The maximum sentence for second-degree manslaughter is 10 years and/or $20,000.

Watch the judge read the verdict:

5:29 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

JUST IN: Chauvin guilty of second-degree unintentional murder

CNN
CNN

Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder.

He is also charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

We're still waiting to hear the verdicts on the other charges.

5:29 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

NOW: The verdict is being read in court

The jury's verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin is being read in court.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd.

Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

4:47 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Police begin shutting gates at Minneapolis Police Headquarters

From CNN’s Adrienne Broaddus in Minneapolis

Shortly after word went out that the jury had reached a verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial, law enforcement officials began shutting a newly-installed gate at Minneapolis Police Headquarters.

A city crew is currently installing additional concrete barriers near the police headquarters as well.

Windows at nearby downtown Minneapolis businesses have also been boarded up Tuesday afternoon.

 

4:37 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Biden will watch verdict from West Wing

From CNN's Jeff Zeleny

President Biden will be watching the verdict from the West Wing, after abruptly rescheduling planned remarks for the American Jobs Plan, a White House official said.

The President made his view clear earlier today when answering CNN's Kaitlan Collins' question, but the White House official says they are putting a plan into motion to have him speak following the verdict. It will not be in the immediate minutes afterward — probably after he speaks to the family, although that’s unclear.

“You will hear from the President as soon as it’s appropriate,” a White House official said.

5:33 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Jurors deliberated for more than 10 hours over two days

From CNN’s Aaron Cooper in Minneapolis

Jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial concluded their deliberations shortly after 3 p.m. ET (2 p.m. local time), Spenser Bickett, a spokesperson for the Hennepin County Court tells CNN.  

In total, jurors deliberated for more than 10 hours over two days to reach the verdict. 

4:20 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Minnesota's governor will speak after the Chauvin verdict

From CNN’s Keith Allen

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz will deliver a public statement to “Minnesotans and the Nation following the announcement of the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial,” according to a statement from his office.

Walz will speak at around 5:30 p.m. local time, or 6:30 p.m. ET, his office said.

5:33 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

Floyd's brother will be in court for reading of the verdict

From CNN’s Sara Sidner

George Floyd’s brother, Philonise Floyd, told CNN that he will be in court for the reading of the verdict.

Philonise Floyd told CNN that he hasn't been able to sleep "through much of this."

He said maybe this verdict will "finally help me get some sleep."

4:22 p.m. ET, April 20, 2021

What the scene is like near where George Floyd died

CNN
CNN

As Minneapolis and the country awaits the verdict, CNN's Omar Jimenez reported near the scene where George Floyd died on May 25, 2020.

"As we've been talking to people throughout here, there has been a combination of emotions. Some tenseness, some nervousness and some even fearful of what the verdict might bring, but at the end of the day one woman we spoke to said that no matter what happens, they are still going to be in the streets," Jimenez said of the mood is in the area right now.

"They are still going to remain in solidarity with each other because they believe that this moment is not just about George Floyd. It was sparked by him, but it means so much more, and it has the potential to send reverberations for generations to come," he continued.

The intersection across Cup Foods is now known as "George Floyd Square," and flowers, messages and photos of other Black Americans killed by police have been placed in the square, including images of Breonna Taylor and Philando Castile.

"People that have come here and visited here during the course of today feel that the verdict comes on the shoulders of these Black bodies that are now no longer here with us," Jimenez said.

"This moment means so much to the people here, and we can only imagine that once that comes down, no matter what it is, people are going to be in the streets either in solidarity or in anger, because as one activist put it to me earlier, when you keep getting pushed and you keep getting pushed, eventually you push back. They are hoping that at least for just a little bit, they don't have to push anymore," he said.

See Minneapolis while country waits for Chauvin verdict: