June 8 George Floyd protest news

By Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes, Meg Wagner and Emma Reynolds, CNN

Updated 9:43 a.m. ET, June 9, 2020
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2:48 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Derek Chauvin bail set at $1.25 million

From CNN’s Aaron Cooper

Hennepin County Sheriff's Office
Hennepin County Sheriff's Office

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin appeared virtually in a Minneapolis court Monday, where the Judge Jeannice Reding granted prosecutor’s motion to set unconditional bail at $1.25 million, or $1 million with conditions.

Those conditions include being law-abiding, making future appearances, not working in a security or law enforcement capacity, surrendering fire arms or ammunition and any fire arm permit, not to leave the Minnesota, and no contact with George Floyd’s family. He would also need to waive extradition upon his release.

The defense did not object to the prosecutor’s bail proposal.  

Chauvin — who pressed his knee on George Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes — was arrested last month and charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Last week, prosecutors added a second-degree murder charge.

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2:06 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin will appear in court for first time

From CNN’s Aaron Cooper

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee on George Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes as the man begged for his life, will appear in court for the first time today.

Chauvin was arrested last month and charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Last week, prosecutors added a second-degree murder charge.

The hearing — in which Chauvin is to appear virtually — was set to begin at 1:45 p.m. ET, a few minutes ago. 

The hearing is being held in a courtroom in the Public Safety Facility in downtown Minneapolis, across the street from the City Hall and Police Headquarters.  

Judge Jeannice Reding will decide on bail for Chauvin during the hearing. 

9:43 a.m. ET, June 9, 2020

Texas governor: "George Floyd is going to change the arc of the future of the United States"

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott spoke to reporters outside the Houston church where George Floyd’s public viewing is underway. The governor noted the significance of Floyd's death for his state and the country, saying "George Floyd is going to change the arc of the future of the United States."

The governor said he had the opportunity to visit with the Floyd family and is committed to working with the family to "ensure we never have anything like this ever occur in the state of Texas."

"Today is a sad day. Ever since his death has been a sad day. This is the most horrific tragedy I have ever personally observed. But George Floyd is going to change the arc of the future of the United States. George Floyd has not died in vain. His life will be a living legacy about the way that America and Texas respond to this tragedy, " Abbott said.

“We're already working with legislators, we are working with his family. His family asked me and I promised his family that I would use and incorporate their family in these discussions, the discussions about the pathway forward," the governor said.

Abbott said the discussions would not be “taken over by politicians” but be led by Floyd’s family members, victims and people who suffer “because of racism for far too long in the state and in this country.”

The governor said some things are already changing in the state, both in police departments and city halls, to prevent police brutality. Abbott said one of the challenges in the state is inadequate training for police training.

"Some actions have already been taken, other actions are being worked on to make sure that we will not have police brutality like what happened to George Floyd. And then when we get to the Texas legislature discussions have begun. Remember this. Texas has a legacy of success whether it be the Timothy Cole act, the Sandra Bland act and now maybe the George Floyd act to make sure that we prevent police brutality like this from happening in the future in Texas," Abbott said.

In the meantime, the governor said his state is working on "peace and celebrating the remarkable life" of Floyd.

Abbott said he was on his way to meet with the Floyd family privately where he would be presenting them with the flag that flew over the capitol building in Floyd’s honor.

Watch:

1:25 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Washington, DC, council member to introduce plan to demilitarize and reduce Metropolitan Police

Councilmember David Grosso speaks at a D.C. City Council vote on Tuesday, May 2, 2017, in Washington, DC. 
Councilmember David Grosso speaks at a D.C. City Council vote on Tuesday, May 2, 2017, in Washington, DC.  Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Council member David Grosso plans to propose four amendments Tuesday to demilitarize and reduce the size of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, DC.

Here's what Grosso said in a statement today:

“Tomorrow, I will propose four amendments. The first three will seek to reduce the use of military-style equipment and tactics by the police. The first would prohibit use of tear gas and other chemical agents on protesters, in accordance with permanent legislation introduced last week by Councilmember Brianne Nadeau. The second would further demilitarize the police by prohibiting use of rubber bullets and limiting the use of riot gear at demonstrations. Finally, I’m proposing a ban on MPD participating in trainings with entities that practice discrimination or with any military or intelligence agency.
“The final amendment would limit MPD to a sworn officer force of 3,500. D.C. currently has 3,863 sworn officers, approximately 55 per 10,000 residents. That’s double the national average and well above other cities of its size or larger. D.C. would still lead the pack of similar cities with 50 officers per 10,000 residents under this new limit.”

1:03 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Temperature checks being conducted on people attending public viewing of George Floyd

From CNN's Gregory Lemos and Adam Jones 

Mourners arrive in the church for a public visitation for George Floyd at the Fountain of Praise church on Monday, June 8, in Houston.
Mourners arrive in the church for a public visitation for George Floyd at the Fountain of Praise church on Monday, June 8, in Houston. David J. Phillip/Pool/Getty Images

Temperature checks are being conducted on people attending the public viewing of George Floyd on Monday, according to video from outside the Fountain of Praise Church in Houston, Texas.

A man can be seen in a mask, face shield, and gloves conducting the checks outside the venue. 

In keeping with the Floyd family and Ben Crump's request that those in attendance follow social distancing guidelines, people both inside and outside the venue are wearing masks.  

Once inside, individuals are being directed into one of two socially-distanced lines. 

12:56 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Joe Biden does not believe police should be defunded, campaign spokesperson says

From CNN’s Sarah Mucha

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at Delaware State University's student center in Dover, Delaware, on Friday, June 5.
Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at Delaware State University's student center in Dover, Delaware, on Friday, June 5. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

As the Defund the Police movement picks up steam across the nation, former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign says that the presumptive Democratic nominee does not believe that police should be defunded.  

"As his criminal justice proposal made clear months ago, Vice President Biden does not believe that police should be defunded. He hears and shares the deep grief and frustration of those calling out for change, and is driven to ensure that justice is done and that we put a stop to this terrible pain," Biden spokesperson Andrew Bates said in a statement obtained by CNN. 

The statement continues: "Biden supports the urgent need for reform — including funding for public schools, summer programs, and mental health and substance abuse treatment separate from funding for policing — so that officers can focus on the job of policing,"

1:01 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Public viewing for George Floyd has started

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

Godofredo A. Vasquez/Pool/AFP/Getty Images
Godofredo A. Vasquez/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

The public viewing of George Floyd has begun at the Fountain of Praise Church in Houston, Texas.  

People are lined up in two separate lines at a social distance inside the church and permitted to view the body of Floyd for about five seconds before being directed to move on.

12:13 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

NYC protesters take a knee outside NYPD headquarters

From CNN's Melanie Schuman

From CNN's Sarah Jorgensen
From CNN's Sarah Jorgensen

Protesters arrived Monday on the plaza outside of One Police Plaza in Manhattan, the headquarters of the New York Police Department chanting “black lives matter” and “no justice, no peace.” 

When they arrived, the protesters knelt for a short time, fists in the air, in silent protest. They then stood up and departed.

The CNN team on the ground estimates the group was on site for about five minutes.

11:43 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Democrats announce police and justice reform legislation

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Pool
Pool

Led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, Democrats announced police and justice reform legislation today.

Pelosi said this "moment of national anguish is being transformed into a movement of national action as Americans from across the country peacefully protest to demand an end to injustice."

“We cannot settle for anything less than transformative structural change, which is why the Justice in Policing Act will remove barriers of prosecuting police misconduct and covering damages by addressing the quality immunity doctrine,” she added.

Some key points of the legislation include...

  • Demilitarizing the police by limiting the transfer of military weapons to state and local police departments
  • Combating police brutality by requiring body and dashboard cameras
  • Banning chokehold and no-knock warrants in drug cases
  • Ending racial profiling

It will also make lynching a federal hate crime.

Pelosi also called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to swiftly take up the legislation once the bill is passed in the House.

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