June 8 George Floyd protest news

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12:15 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Floyd family releases updated memorial and public viewing details

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

The family of George Floyd has released updated details on the memorial and public viewing set to take place today in Houston.

Today's public viewing will take place from 1 p.m. ET to 7 p.m. ET at the Fountain of Praise Church in Houston, Texas.

A private funeral is scheduled for Tuesday.

“Due to social distancing guidelines, the Tuesday memorial service is limited to 500 people which will include family and close friends of George Floyd and the family,” the statement said. “Therefore, the public is asked to pay their respects at the public viewing.”
10:42 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

NYC mayor refuses to answer questions on specifics of reallocating NYPD funding 

From CNN's Kristina Sgueglia

Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks during memorial service for George Floyd in New York on Thursday, June 4.
Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks during memorial service for George Floyd in New York on Thursday, June 4. Lev Radin/Sipa/AP

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio refused to answer questions about his recent announcement regarding reallocating funding for the New York City Police Department to youth and social services for communities of color - declining to give a dollar amount, what exactly will be reduced and what exactly the money will be put toward.

He said this will be a part of discussions over the next three weeks as the budget for the city is ironed out.

“I’m not answering you today because we will do that as part of the negotiations,” de Blasio said. 

The mayor praised the work of the New York Police Department Commissioner and Chief of Department following rumors of an NYPD shakeup.

“I don’t know who is planting these rumors, they’re wrong,” he said.  

He said NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Chief of Department Terence Monahan are “doing their job, and doing it well in very tough circumstances.”

More context: de Blasio said on Sunday that the city will move some of its funding from the NYPD. He said the city would find "find significant savings in the NYPD budget" that will go toward "youth development and social services for communities of color."

10:46 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Minneapolis official explains why city council members want to defund and dismantle the police department

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

CNN via Cisco Webex
CNN via Cisco Webex

George Floyd’s death was a wake up call as people got to see what many already knew, “which is that our police department is not keeping every member of our community safe,” said Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender.

That wake up call drove the city council’s decision to defund and dismantle the city's police department, she says, adding that it will take a long time to get there.

“I know the statement was bold and I stand by that bold statement, but the work ahead of us will be long,” she said.

She outlined various issues like stable housing and access to health care that come under the scope of safety. The community, she said, wants more investment in these areas instead of putting more money toward militarizing the police force.

Bender also addressed the concerns some people have with the dismantling of the police, saying they’re not starting from scratch.

“We have invested in community-based safety strategies,” she said. ”We've done an analysis of all the reasons people call 911, and have looked up ways we can shift the response away from our armed police officers into a more appropriate response for mental health calls, for some domestic violence calls, for health-related issues. And so the groundwork is laid already in Minneapolis for us to build on that.”

Some background: Nine members of the Minneapolis City Council on Sunday announced they intend to defund and dismantle the city's police department following Floyd's killing. With nine votes the city council would have a veto-proof supermajority of the council's 13 members, Bender said.

10:22 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Hearse carrying the body of George Floyd arrives at Houston church

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

The hearse carrying the body of George Floyd has arrived at the Fountain of Praise Church in Houston, Texas. The hearse arrived in a police-escorted motorcade.

The public viewing is expected to begin at 1 p.m. ET. 

City officials are expecting thousands of mourners during today's visitation for Floyd, whose death in Minneapolis police custody has sparked protests around the United States and across the world.

10:14 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Denver Police Department bans chokeholds and carotid compressions  

From CNN's Gregory Lemos  

People protest in front of the Colorado State Capitol on Saturday, June 6, in Denver.
People protest in front of the Colorado State Capitol on Saturday, June 6, in Denver. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

The Denver Police Department announced Sunday it was banning chokeholds and carotid compressions "with no exceptions," according to a press release.   

DPD announced two other changes in the department, including that officers will have to report to a supervisor if they intentionally point a weapon at someone. A report will then be generated "to improve data collection and evaluation of these incidents." 

Additionally, Denver Police Department Metro/SWAT unit members will now wear body cameras they will be required to activate during operations.  

9:53 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Minneapolis mayor says he is not for “entirely abolishing” the police department 

From CNN’s Gregory Lemos

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey speaks during a news conference on Thursday, May 28, in Minneapolis.
Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey speaks during a news conference on Thursday, May 28, in Minneapolis. Elizabeth Flores/Star Tribune/AP

In the wake of the Minneapolis City Council's announcement that it plans to disband the police department, Mayor Jacob Frey told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that he is not for abolishing the Minneapolis Police Department.  

"We need a full on cultural shift in how our Minneapolis Police Department and departments throughout the country function," Frey said Monday on "Good Morning America." "Am I for entirely abolishing the police department? No, I am not."   

Frey said he is looking forward to working with members of the city council to better understand what they mean by "ending" and "abolishing."

The mayor also expressed his support for Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo who he said was "chock-full of integrity."  

Frey said he will be "going after the police union." 

"There are so many areas where both mayors and chiefs, elected officials, and otherwise, have been hamstrung for generations because we can't get the necessary cultural shift because we have difficulty both terminating and disciplining officers and then getting that termination or discipline to stick," Frey said.  

12:26 p.m. ET, June 8, 2020

At least 36 people arrested during London's Sunday protests

From CNN's David Wilkinson

Lines of police officers block off Whitehall in central London after a demonstration, on Sunday, June 7.
Lines of police officers block off Whitehall in central London after a demonstration, on Sunday, June 7. Isabel Infantes/AFP/Getty Images

London’s Metropolitan Police arrested 36 people during the protests in the capital yesterday. Offenses included violent disorder, criminal damage and assaulting police. 

A statement released by the police force said despite largely peaceful demonstration “a number remained in the area around Whitehall and behaved anti-socially before coming violent towards officers.”

Police managed to disperse the final protestors at 2:00 a.m. local time on Monday. Officers used “a variety of tactics including containment to tackle several violent and antisocial groups.”

The statement also made reference to 35 police officers having suffered injuries, two of which required hospitalization.

“The violent criminality we saw is disgraceful and will have been very frightening for others. It will never be acceptable to attack police officers, damage property and leave others in fear of their safety, " Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick said.

She added that “those attending mass gatherings risk exposing themselves and others to this deadly virus and I would ask them to find other ways to express their anger and frustration.”

8:53 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Thousands expected to honor George Floyd in Houston today

From CNN's Jay Croft

The moon is seen behind the Fountain of Praise church where services will be held for George Floyd on June 8, 2020 in Houston Texas. - Democrats vowed June 7, 2020 to press legislation to fight systemic racism in US law enforcement as the battle for change triggered by the police killing of George Floyd began shifting from the streets to the political sphere.Demonstrations continued across the nation Sunday -- including in Washington, New York and Winter Park, Florida -- as protesters began focusing their initial outrage over the death of the unarmed Floyd into demands for police reform and social justice. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP) (Photo by JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)
The moon is seen behind the Fountain of Praise church where services will be held for George Floyd on June 8, 2020 in Houston Texas. - Democrats vowed June 7, 2020 to press legislation to fight systemic racism in US law enforcement as the battle for change triggered by the police killing of George Floyd began shifting from the streets to the political sphere.Demonstrations continued across the nation Sunday -- including in Washington, New York and Winter Park, Florida -- as protesters began focusing their initial outrage over the death of the unarmed Floyd into demands for police reform and social justice. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP) (Photo by JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images) Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Houston officials are expecting thousands of mourners during today's visitation for George Floyd, whose death in Minneapolis police custody has sparked protests around the United States and across the world.

Floyd will be buried in Houston next to his mother, according to the Fort Bend Memorial Planning Center.

The public is invited to attend the visitation from noon to 6 p.m. local time, La'Torria Lemon, spokesperson for the funeral home, said.

"We're anticipating close to 10,000 and that's what we're preparing for," she said.

To comply with social distancing rules, 15 guests at a time will be allowed inside of The Fountain of Praise. Guests will be allowed to stay inside no more than 10 minutes after viewing the body. Guests must wear a mask and gloves, and casual attire is permitted.

Floyd's connection to Houston: Floyd, 46, grew up in the city's Third Ward. He graduated from Jack Yates High School in 1992, where he helped the football team win the state title. He also played basketball there, Lemon said.

Before moving to Minneapolis, Floyd was well known in the Houston music scene, rapping with a group called Screwed Up Clik (SUC).

Floyd's body is already in Houston, according to Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo.

"#GeorgeFloyd and his family are safely in Houston," he tweeted Sunday.

It was "a big deal for our city to bring him back home," Acevedo said. "He's well known, he's known by a lot of our officers. We want to make sure that the family is safe, that the movement is safe. We want to make sure that the family knows that we're here for them and we support them at this time."

9:03 a.m. ET, June 8, 2020

Officer charged in Floyd killing "did not stand by and watch," says attorney

Earl Gray, defense attorney for former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane, talks to reporters on Thursday, June 4, outside court in downtown Minneapolis.
Earl Gray, defense attorney for former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane, talks to reporters on Thursday, June 4, outside court in downtown Minneapolis. Jeff Baenen/AP

The attorney for one of the police officers charged over George Floyd's death said his client "did not stand by and watch" while the man died with Derek Chauvin's knee on his neck.

Earl Gray, attorney for police officer Thomas Lane, told NBC's Today Show his client "was doing what he thought was right."

Lane, 37, had only been on the force for four days when he helped to restrain Floyd, according to his lawyer. Asked how his client could stand by and watch for nearly nine minutes, Gray said:

"He did not stand by and watch. He was holding the legs because they guy was resisting at first. Now, when he’s holding his legs he says to Chauvin, well should we roll him over? Because he says he can’t breathe. Chauvin says no."

Chauvin, Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao were responding to a call about a $20 counterfeit bill on May 25 when they detained Floyd, who died while in custody. 

The four officers were fired and are now facing charges in Floyd's death.  

Chauvin, 44, was charged last Wednesday with a new, more serious count of second-degree murder. 

Kueng, Thao and Lane were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.