June 2 George Floyd protest news

By Jessie Yeung, Steve George, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes and Daniella Diaz, CNN

Updated 0515 GMT (1315 HKT) June 3, 2020
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5:52 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Vegas Police investigating two shootings involving officers

From CNN’s Joe Sutton

Police block off Las Vegas Boulevard South after a shooting that took place during a protest in downtown Las Vegas on June 1.
Police block off Las Vegas Boulevard South after a shooting that took place during a protest in downtown Las Vegas on June 1. Christopher DeVargas/Las Vegas Sun/AP

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police are investigating two shootings involving officers that occurred overnight on Las Vegas Boulevard, CNN affiliate KVVU-TV said.  

The shootings took place near Circus Circus and downtown by the federal courthouse, police told the station. 

An officer was shot on the 2800 block of Las Vegas Boulevard South, near Circus Circus, police told KVVU-TV.  

A large police presence was also at the University Medical Center.  

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak acknowledged that his office had been notified of the incidents.

“My office has been notified that the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department is currently working two separate incidents in Las Vegas. The State is in contact with local law enforcement and continues to monitor the situation,” the governor tweeted. 

CNN has reached out to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police and to University Medical Center.

5:11 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Two-thirds of people put in neck restraints by Minneapolis police were black, department data shows 

From CNN's Casey Tolan

In the years leading up to George Floyd's death with his neck beneath the knee of a Minneapolis policeman, at least 58 people lost consciousness after the city's officers put them in neck restraints, according to a CNN analysis of use of force data from the police department. 

Officers used neck restraints on 428 people since 2012, and 14% lost consciousness, the data showed. That means the procedure, which is restricted or banned in many large police departments around the country, was used an average of about once a week in the city over that time period.

About two-thirds of the people placed in neck restraints by Minneapolis officers were black -- in a city where black residents make up 19% of the population, according to Census data

Use of force experts told CNN that the procedure that officer Derek Chauvin used -- pressing his knee into the back of Floyd's neck for several minutes, as Floyd groaned that he couldn't breathe -- wouldn't qualify as a proper neck restraint under the city's policy and procedure manual

But the Minneapolis department does allow officers to compress "one or both sides of a person's neck with an arm or leg, without applying direct pressure to the trachea or airway," according to a section of the manual that is marked as last being updated in 2012. It calls the method a "non-deadly force option."

Read more:

4:34 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Historic curfews in Los Angeles and New York are the harshest in decades

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

People stand handcuffed by police in the Hollywood area during an emergency curfew on June 1 in Los Angeles, California.
People stand handcuffed by police in the Hollywood area during an emergency curfew on June 1 in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Curfews have been issued across the country in the wake of protests, both peaceful and violent, against police brutality following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week.

In Los Angeles: the curfew is the harshest since the riots in 1992 following the acquittal of the officer who beat Rodney King.

The county of Los Angeles, the nation's most populous county with approximately ten million residents, enacted a 12-hour overnight curfew from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. starting Monday night. 

Officials said the highly restrictive curfew has been ordered because of "imminent danger to life and property during the hours of darkness," in the executive order.

In New York City: On the East Coast, New York City has enacted the strictest curfew since the race riots of 1943.

Governor Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio ordered a curfew from 11 p.m. until 5 a.m. for the city that never sleeps, and an 8 p.m. curfew from Tuesday.

Read the full story:

9:12 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

George Floyd's last words fly across the skies of US cities

From CNN's Oscar Holland

A banner reading "Please I can't breathe" flies.
A banner reading "Please I can't breathe" flies. Jammie Holmes/Library Street Collective/Hayden Stinebaugh

The final words of George Floyd, the unarmed black man who died after being restrained by a Minneapolis police officer, have become powerful slogans for protesters in the US.

As demonstrations against police brutality have spread through the country and the world, Dallas-based artist Jammie Holmes found a new way to immortalize Floyd's pleas for help: sending them across the skies of five major cities.

Over the weekend, banners reading "Please I can't breathe" and "They're going to kill me" were seen trailing airplanes above Detroit and New York City respectively. The other three, flown across Los Angeles, Miami and Dallas, read "My stomach hurts," "My neck hurts" and "Everything hurts" -- words heard in a video filmed by a bystander and widely circulated on social media. 

Read the full story.

A banner flies above Dallas, where artist Jammie Holmes is based.
A banner flies above Dallas, where artist Jammie Holmes is based. Jammie Holmes/Library Street Collective/Mark LaBoyteaux

9:20 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Four officers shot in St. Louis have non-life-threatening injuries

Four officers shot in St. Louis during protests over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis have non-life-threatening injuries.  

Two of the officers were shot in the leg, one was shot in the foot and one was shot in the arm, St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden said in a press conference.  

The injured officers were standing near a police line and felt sudden pain, but they didn’t hear shots, the chief said.  

“Thank God they are alive,” Hayden said. 

He added that protesters also attempted to seize the police headquarters.

“Can we make some sense out of this? Can we make some sense out of this? That’s all I am trying to say. Mr. Floyd’s death is tragic," he said.

9:12 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Trump's speech will be remembered "for the very wrong reasons"

President Trump delivers remarks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on June 1.
President Trump delivers remarks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on June 1. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

CNN political analyst and adviser to four US presidents, David Gergan, said President Trump's speech on Monday will be remembered for the "wrong reasons."

Gergan referenced Robert Kennedy's speech that he gave announcing the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., saying that in times of crisis leaders should bring people together, not divide them.

"He (Kennedy) was in a situation coming to the speech when he learned that Martin Luther King, Jr. had not only been shot but just died. It was left to him to go in front of the crowd of largely black citizens who didn't know King was dead," Gergan said.

"It stems from the proposition that in a moment of crisis it's the responsibility of the speaker to unify people and not divide them. To bring them together and comfort them. Give meaning to the occasion. That's what Kennedy did. He showed a lot of empathy and talked about the fact he too had lost someone really important to him — his brother to an assassination. He had the much the same anger and despair. He learned to deal with it."

Gergan said President Trump's speech on Monday was "the total opposite."

"I never heard a President, frankly, in a crisis incite people to violence," he said. "The speech today will be remembered in history as well. For the very wrong reasons."

In his speech, Trump called violent protests "domestic acts of terror" and threatened to deploy the military to put down the unrest.

Watch Trump's speech:

9:13 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Here's a catch up on developments over the past few hours

President Donald Trump walks from the White House through Lafayette Park to visit St. John's Church in Washington DC, on Monday, June 1.
President Donald Trump walks from the White House through Lafayette Park to visit St. John's Church in Washington DC, on Monday, June 1. Patrick Semansky/AP

Protests erupted for a seventh day across the US over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, at the hands of a police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Here are the latest developments:

Washington, DC: In a speech Monday, President Donald Trump declared himself "your President of law and order," and vowed to clear the streets using the military if necessary. Peaceful protesters just outside the White House gates were dispersed with tear gas, flash grenades and rubber bullets in advance of Trump's address.

Trump's photo op: Trump delivered his remarks in the White House Rose Garden, before walking a short distance to St. John's church to take a photo with a Bible. Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington said that her community did not approve of Trump's visit to St. John's — one of the churches in her diocese — and distanced herself from his actions Monday afternoon.

"The President just used a bible, the most sacred text of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and one of the churches of my diocese without permission as a backdrop for a message antithetical to the teachings of Jesus and everything that our churches stand for," Budde said.

Military helicopter over DC: Protesters defied curfews in the capital following Trump's remarks earlier in the day. At least one military helicopter was seen flying overhead and hovering in an attempt to disperse the crowds.The helicopter could be seen making slow low-level passes, using its propellers to kick up strong wind and debris.

Looting in Manhattan: Widespread looting erupted in upscale parts of Manhattan in New York on Monday evening in scenes described by CNN Senior Media Correspondent Brian Stelter as "anarchy." In Midtown Manhattan, there was looting along the eastern portion of the neighborhood, including on Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue, close to Trump Tower.

Arrests: Atlanta police have made 350 arrests related to the George Floyd protests since Friday, the department said on Monday. In Saint Paul, Minnesota, police arrested 66 protesters Monday night during a peaceful protest outside the State Capitol, police said. And in In Oakland, California, more than 40 protesters were detained and arrested for being on the streets past the curfew.

Solidarity protests: From Amsterdam to Berlin to Rio de Janeiro, thousands around the world have taken to the streets to protest George Floyd's death in solidarity with Black Lives Matter activists in America.

3:21 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Tiger Woods releases statement on George Floyd's death and protests

From CNN's Amir Vera

Tiger Woods joins a growing list of athletes to express their thoughts on George Floyd's death and the protests that have followed

The star golfer released a statement on Twitter saying his heart goes out to Floyd's family and "all of us who are hurting right now."

He added that he has "always had the utmost respect for our law enforcement."

"They train so diligently to understand how, when and where to use force," Woods said. "This shocking tragedy clearly crossed that line."

Magic JohnsonKareem Abdul-Jabbar and LeBron James also are among the athletes who have either released statements, made social media posts or written about the protests and why they have struck a nerve in America.

3:35 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Boxing champ Floyd Mayweather will pay for George Floyd's funeral, ESPN reports

From CNN's Jill Martin and Hollie Silverman

Floyd Mayweather celebrated his birthday at the Sunset Eden in Los Angeles, California, on February 21.
Floyd Mayweather celebrated his birthday at the Sunset Eden in Los Angeles, California, on February 21. Parisa Afsahi/Sipa/AP

Boxing champion Floyd Mayweather will pay for George Floyd's funeral, a representative for the athlete told ESPN.

Floyd died at the hands of Minneapolis police last week as former officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck and two other officers restrained him. A fourth officer stood by as it happened. The former officers have all been fired by the department but only Chauvin has been charged in the death.

funeral for Floyd will be held in his hometown of Houston on June 9, family attorney Ben Crump said.

Leonard Ellerbe, the CEO of Mayweather Promotions, confirmed the boxer's involvement in a statement to ESPN.

"He'll probably get mad at me for saying that, but yes, (Mayweather) is definitely paying for the funeral," Ellerbe said.

Ellerbe also told ESPN that Mayweather did not want to talk about what he is doing.