June 2 George Floyd protest news

By Jessie Yeung, Steve George, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes and Daniella Diaz, CNN

Updated 0515 GMT (1315 HKT) June 3, 2020
34 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
7:16 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Suspect who intentionally drove car into Denver police officers during weekend protests arrested

From CNN's Jaide Garcia

A man has been arrested on suspicion of intentionally driving his car into three Denver police officers during protests on Saturday nights.

The officers were seriously injured after they were struck by a fast-moving vehicle, according to Denver Police. 

Anthony Knapp, 37, was arrested the following day and is being held for first-degree assault and attempted first-degree assault. He was tracked down by detectives tracing scattered pieces of his car and posting a Crime Stoppers bulletin. 

The ongoing investigation is among the first to be opened involving attacks against police during protests across the US.

The Denver Police sent CNN their Statement of Probable Cause saying the officers were in full uniform standing next to a fully marked Denver Police vehicle, when a dark sedan traveling at a "high rate of speed, swerved toward the officers and as a result, struck three of the officers with the car." 

The officers were transported to the Denver Health Medical Center in an ambulance, according to the statement. One sustained a fractured leg and the other two sustained "substantial risk of protracted loss or impairment of the function of any part or organ of the body." 

7:11 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Kremlin: Trump, Putin did not discuss US unrest in phone call

From CNN's Darya Tarasova in Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin is pictured at his Novo-Ogaryovo state residence, outside Moscow, on May 28.
Russian President Vladimir Putin is pictured at his Novo-Ogaryovo state residence, outside Moscow, on May 28. Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP/Getty Images

Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov on Tuesday said President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin did not discuss the unrest sweeping the US in a phone call Monday. 

Asked in a conference call with reporters if the issue was raised during the conversation, Peskov said: "No, this is not a question of bilateral Russian-American relations."

Pressed on whether protests over police violence in the US might bring attention to similar incidents in Russia, Peskov said he saw no parallels between the two countries. 

"I do not agree with you that the issues now at the forefront in the United States are relevant to our agenda. We have our own agenda and, thank God, what is happening in America is not happening in our country. Thank God, I repeat."
6:50 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

George Floyd's death is "abuse of power," says top EU diplomat

From CNN's James Frater

Josep Borrell, High Representative of the European Union, holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium, on May 26.
Josep Borrell, High Representative of the European Union, holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium, on May 26. Pool/Getty Images

George Floyd's death was an abuse of power and must be renounced, a top EU diplomat said at a briefing in Belgium.

Josep Borrell, High Representative of the European Union, said all societies should remain vigilant against the use of excess force and deal with such incidents quickly.

"We here in Europe, like the people of the United States, we are shocked and appalled by the death of George Floyd. And I think all societies must remain vigilant against the excess of use of force and ensure that all such incidents are addressed swiftly, effectively and in full respect of the rule of law and human rights," Borrell said.

“We have to be sure everywhere, especially in societies which are based on the rule of law, democratic representation and respect for freedoms and liberties, that people who are in charge of taking care of the order are not using their capacities in the way that has been used in this very, very unhappy death of George Floyd."
"It is an abuse of power and this has to be renounced as we combat [this] in the States and everywhere."

He added: "We support the right to peaceful protest, and also we condemn violence and racism of any kind, and for sure we call for a de-escalation of tensions.” 

7:22 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Alleged assault of Wall Street Journal reporter by NYPD being investigated by District Attorney

From CNN's Kara Scannell and Madeline Holcombe

The News Corp building in New York, home to The Wall Street Journal, is pictured on March 20, 2019.
The News Corp building in New York, home to The Wall Street Journal, is pictured on March 20, 2019. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

The Manhattan District Attorney's Office is investigating the alleged assault of a Wall Street Journal reporter covering the George Floyd protests by members of the New York Police Department, a spokesman for the office told CNN.

"Our office has prosecuted dozens of uniformed officers for official misconduct and violence since 2010, and this longstanding tradition of independence and accountability will continue in the days and weeks ahead," District Attorney Cyrus Vance said in a statement.

"We are actively monitoring social media and other sources to identify investigative leads into claims of excessive force and we strongly encourage New Yorkers to share them with us."

WSJ reporter Tyler Blint-Welsh tweeted Sunday evening that NYPD officers "hit me in the face multiple times with riot shields and pushed me to the ground. I was backing away as request, with my hands up. My NYPD-issued press badge was clearly visible. I'm just sitting here crying. This sucks."

CNN has reached out to the NYPD, Blint-Welsh, The Wall Street Journal and the New York Attorney General's office for comment regarding the alleged assault.

Read more:

9:12 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Minneapolis site of Floyd's death treated as memorial after family calls for calm

George Floyd's brother, Terrence Floyd, visits a makeshift memorial in Minneapolis on June 1.
George Floyd's brother, Terrence Floyd, visits a makeshift memorial in Minneapolis on June 1. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Hours after George Floyd's brother asked protesters to abstain from violence, the Minneapolis site where Floyd died last week was being treated as a sacred memorial.

The subdued scene was in a sharp contrast with what was taking place in other cities across the country overnight where protesters were undeterred by curfews, enforced in an effort to curb the unrest that has erupted in the week since Floyd's death in police custody. 

"Our cities are boiling over because people are in pain," Louisville Urban League President Sadiqa Reynolds told CNN's Don Lemon Monday night. "It's about years and years and years of a lack of access to justice. It's a lack of accountability on the part of the police departments. It's about the good officers not calling out the bad ones."

Floyd's family as well as many mayors and governors support the protests but have condemned the looting and violence that has led to hundreds of arrests nationwide.

Protesters have also been met with tear gas and rubber bullets by some police departments, though there have been examples of police joining demonstrators.

Floyd's brother, Terrence Floyd, spoke to those gathered in support of his brother Monday, delivering a simple message for those committing violence.

"He would not want y'all to be doing this," he said.

Read more:

5:59 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Three generations of black men: "We're stuck in a time capsule"

Clockwise from top left: Ajani Carr; Mike Mosby; Peniel Joseph; and Ed Whitfield.
Clockwise from top left: Ajani Carr; Mike Mosby; Peniel Joseph; and Ed Whitfield.

"We ... deserve the chance to grow and to learn and to love others. And to be a person with a heartbeat, with a breath to take," says 17-year-old Ajani Carr.

He is one of four men from three generations who have shared their experience of different stages of the civil rights movement in America in a powerful video for CNN. They explain what they think has changed, and what progress still needs to be made.

"I don't feel afraid, I don't live my life with fear, but I do live my life with caution," says Peniel Joseph, 47.

Ed Whitfield, 70, recalls the activists involved in the civil rights movement in the 60s, such as Sammy Younge Jr, who was murdered in Selma, Alabama for using the "whites-only" restroom.

"Shot and killed, nothing was done," says Whitfield. "So there's nothing new about this part."

Mike Mosby, 32, adds: “You would think it’s 1965, you know, like we just got out of segregation and now we’re trying for civil rights ... That’s what it feels like.”

“I swear it’s like we’re stuck in a time capsule.”

Watch the video here:

9:21 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Some police officers are showing solidarity with protesters by taking a knee or embracing them

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

A police officer embraces a protester in Atlanta on June 1.
A police officer embraces a protester in Atlanta on June 1. John Bazemore/AP

Americans have been protesting the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police for days on end in dozens of cities throughout the United States.

While tensions between police and demonstrators have heated up in many places, some officers have shown solidarity with the movement by hugging protesters, praying with them, mourning with them, and taking a knee to honor Floyd.

In Atlanta, Georgia, a line of police officers holding shields during a protest Monday near Centennial Olympic park kneeled in front of demonstrators.

In another image, an officer wearing a gas mask, helmet and vest was seen embracing a demonstrator in a hug on the fourth day of protests in the southern city.

The Denver Chief of Police Paul Pazen joined in with demonstrators Monday, linking arms with attendees.

In New York, Chief of Department of the New York City Police, Terence Monahan, embraced a demonstrator during a protest in his city Monday.

On the west coast, protestor Kevin Welbeck of Cre8 The Change shook hands with a California Highway Patrol officer during a protest in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles.

Read more:

9:21 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

NYPD sergeant struck by hit-and-run driver 

From CNN’s Brynn Gingras and Mike Figliola

A New York Police sergeant responding to a break-in at a pawn shop was struck by a black sedan, according to NYPD Detective Adam Navarro. The sergeant is in serious, but stable condition with a leg and head injury, NYPD Lt. Thomas Antonetti told CNN. 

The driver fled the scene and no arrests have been made, police said. 

According to Navarro, the incident occurred at approximately 12:45 a.m. ET.

More than 200 people were arrested last night at New York protests, mainly in Manhattan, police said.

Brooklyn and Bronx had some activity, but Manhattan had the bulk of the arrests, they added.

5:52 a.m. ET, June 2, 2020

Vegas Police investigating two shootings involving officers

From CNN’s Joe Sutton

Police block off Las Vegas Boulevard South after a shooting that took place during a protest in downtown Las Vegas on June 1.
Police block off Las Vegas Boulevard South after a shooting that took place during a protest in downtown Las Vegas on June 1. Christopher DeVargas/Las Vegas Sun/AP

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police are investigating two shootings involving officers that occurred overnight on Las Vegas Boulevard, CNN affiliate KVVU-TV said.  

The shootings took place near Circus Circus and downtown by the federal courthouse, police told the station. 

An officer was shot on the 2800 block of Las Vegas Boulevard South, near Circus Circus, police told KVVU-TV.  

A large police presence was also at the University Medical Center.  

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak acknowledged that his office had been notified of the incidents.

“My office has been notified that the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department is currently working two separate incidents in Las Vegas. The State is in contact with local law enforcement and continues to monitor the situation,” the governor tweeted. 

CNN has reached out to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police and to University Medical Center.